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Bitch nipples turned DARK! Not pregnant!

Nagini
April 25th, 2011, 01:12 PM
Hi!

I wonder why my dogs (female, 2Ży, not spayed) nipples have turned very dark? Some of the stomach area and the tip of the nipples have turned darkish purple.

She is supposed to get in heat any time now - we expect it to start within days. She is very low active, but she eats/drinks and pees/poops normally, and she likes to play still. She always gets like this - much less active - around her heat, so I haven't worried about this change.

But the color change?

She is not pregnant and has never been.

Melinda
April 25th, 2011, 02:20 PM
wish I could help you but I've never had a nonspayed female dog, all mine were spayed at 6 months, maybe you should contact your vet.

hazelrunpack
April 25th, 2011, 02:46 PM
Most of the members here are very pro-spay/neuter, Nagini, so if it's something that's related to her heat cycle, likely not many will have any experience with it. :shrug: Some pigment changes are normal as a dog ages, but only a vet can tell you for sure what's going on. Have you talked to your vet?

kathryn
April 25th, 2011, 05:04 PM
I would watch out for a Pyometra. Those are generally silent killers and can kill an unspayed dog or cat in a couple days.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyometra

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2109&aid=918

I'm going to go ahead and assume since you were unsure of something like this and went ahead and consulted us vs. a vet or mentor, you are not an established breeder... sooo why not just spay your dog? :shrug: That way you know for sure that nothing funky is going on with her hormones and don't risk your dogs health & life over something so easily corrected :thumbs up

Every time your dog goes into heat, you significantly increase the risks of Pyometras, Cancers, Mammary Tumors, Prolapsed Uterus/Vagina, etc.

https://ebusiness.avma.org/EBusiness50/files/productdownloads/spay_neuter_brochure.pdf


What are the benefits to spaying my female pet?
Female dogs experience a “heat” cycle approximately every six months,
depending upon the breed. A female dog’s heat cycle can last as long as 21
days, during which your dog may leave blood stains in the house and may
become anxious, short-tempered and actively seek a mate. A female dog in
heat may be more likely to fight with other female dogs, including other
females in the same household.



Contrary to what some people believe, getting pregnant —even once —does not
improve the behavior of female dogs and cats. In fact, the mating instinct may
lead to undesirable behaviors and result in undue stress on both the owner and
the animal. Also, while some pet owners may have good intentions, few are
prepared for the work involved in monitoring their pet’s pregnancy, caring for
the puppies or kittens and locating good homes for them.
What is surgical sterilization?
During surgical sterilization, a veterinarian removes certain reproductive
What are the benefits of neutering my male pet?
At maturity (on average, 6 to 9 months of age),
male dogs and cats are capable of breeding. Both
male dogs and cats are likely to begin
“marking” their territories by spraying strong-
smelling urine on your furniture, curtains, and
in other places in your house. Also, given the
slightest chance, intact males may attempt to
escape from home and roam in search of a
mate. Dogs and cats seeking a female in heat
can become aggressive and may injure
themselves, other animals or people by engaging
in fights. Roaming animals are also more likely to be hit by cars.



Between the US and Canada we euthanize probably over 10 million cats & dogs each year because no one wants them :( Including puppies and kittens.



p.s. does your username have anything to do with Harry Potter? =P

kathryn
April 25th, 2011, 05:17 PM
No Kathryn. I'm afraid that number is very very low. It's closer to 20 million I believe. And yet we keep pumping out more............

Very true. I aimed low but in my heart I know it is much much more, because many places STILL don't require you to keep statistics!! They are often the same places that don't bother to do any type of low cost spay neuter to help people :frustrated:


Besides saving the lives of unwanted pets, spaying and neutering can save your OWN pets life!! :thumbs up

mikischo
April 25th, 2011, 06:16 PM
Between the US and Canada we euthanize probably over 10 million cats & dogs each year because no one wants them :( Including puppies and kittens.


:offtopic:
Kathryn, I agree we do have a very serious problem in North America. This is our problem. Nagini lives in Sweden, a country where pet overpopulation is virtually non-existent. In Sweden, they rarely spay or neuter their pets. It is their unquestioned societal norm for pet owners to control their pets' reproduction. They are obviously quite successful. :)

(Back on topic.) Nagini, there could be a number of possible reasons for hyperpigmentation of the skin. For example, hypothyroidism can sometimes cause the skin to darken. There are several other possible causes. A veterinarian will be able to determine what is the cause in the case of your dog. Please keep us updated on what you find out.

And an updated picture of Lily would be nice. :D

kathryn
April 25th, 2011, 06:46 PM
:offtopic:
Kathryn, I agree we do have a very serious problem in North America. This is our problem. Nagini lives in Sweden, a country where pet overpopulation is virtually non-existent. In Sweden, they rarely spay or neuter their pets. It is their unquestioned societal norm for pet owners to control their pets' reproduction. They are obviously quite successful. :)


Okay... but still for health benefits one would think such an educated society of people would understand that? :shrug: It's still a good idea to spay and neuter regardless of where you are.... cancers, pyometras etc are equally deadly no matter where you live. A dog of that age who has gone into multiple heats is a prime example of a dog at risk for a pyometra.

dbg10
April 25th, 2011, 06:52 PM
I have never had a female dog that wasn't spade so I can't comment from experience or give you any ideas for what is happening to Lily's nipples but I definitely would talk to your vet and if necessary take her for a visit.

Nagini.as mikischo said there are a lot of reasons why her nipples have becomes so dark, some not very good at all. I'm sure you don't want to expose her to other dogs (male) at this time, but it may be necessary for her health.

I also wouldn't be concerned that she has Pyometra because her symptoms would be a lot different than they are if she had it. :)

We do have a few breeders here in this forum and they may drop by with some suggestions. Good luck with Lily :) and good vibes that it's her heat that is causing the darkening. :goodvibes: :fingerscr

BenMax
April 25th, 2011, 07:43 PM
Okay... but still for health benefits one would think such an educated society of people would understand that? :shrug: It's still a good idea to spay and neuter regardless of where you are.... cancers, pyometras etc are equally deadly no matter where you live. A dog of that age who has gone into multiple heats is a prime example of a dog at risk for a pyometra.

You gave excellent advice based on facts. Regardless of where someone resides, EDUCATION is the key.
Good for you for sharing based on your knowledge. Don't let anyone discourage you from sending this very important message regardless of where they live.:thumbs up

Goldfields
April 25th, 2011, 09:01 PM
Okay... but still for health benefits one would think such an educated society of people would understand that? :shrug: It's still a good idea to spay and neuter regardless of where you are.... cancers, pyometras etc are equally deadly no matter where you live. A dog of that age who has gone into multiple heats is a prime example of a dog at risk for a pyometra.

Not quite true, it's more likely the middle aged bitch that hasn't been bred from that is most at risk, not one that is just 2 1/2 , though I know a pyometra could strike after any heat if you were really unlucky. Hypothyroidism - yes, my sheltie boy got patches of dark skin, but golly, even more noteworthy were the facts that he became grossly fat and lost his coat. Nagini, if there are no signs of that then a trip to the vet would set your mind at ease.

Mikischo, funny you should say this ....

It is their unquestioned societal norm for pet owners to control their pets' reproduction.

It's the same here in Australia, but then as I've tried to tell people here, we do not have this overpopulation problem anywhere near as badly as in Canada.

kathryn
April 25th, 2011, 09:27 PM
Well, I guess I will just say from my personal experience working as a spueter tech and being on 10,000+ surgeries, in dogs the 99% of the pyos were in dogs 2-4 years of age that have never been bred. I always say why risk it when the solution is SO easy :D In cats, pyos are just random & at any age and sometimes have nothing to do with breeding status at all. Infact, on several occasions I've seen pregnant cats that also have pyometras, and luckily we were able to save their lives by spaying 'em.

Slight hijack, but once we had a VERY big female pitbull come in with a suspected pyo. She was jumping all over the place and seemed perfectly fine, but we took her in as an emergency anyways.. opened her up.. and ... :eek: I ended up getting the uterus from the vet afterwards and sticking it in a dish pan and weighing it (sorry, I'm totally weird).. It weighed over FIVE POUNDS!! :eek: The only other symptoms the dog had were just really oddly swollen nipples and some vaginal discharge... but man oh man if that had ruptured that would have been very sad for the dog :(

I hope that OP is able to get their doggy in for a checkup just to make sure nothing funky is going on! :thumbs up

Shaykeija
April 25th, 2011, 09:51 PM
:thumbs up

Well said......:thumbs up

Goldfields
April 26th, 2011, 12:35 AM
Well, I guess I will just say from my personal experience working as a spueter tech and being on 10,000+ surgeries, in dogs the 99% of the pyos were in dogs 2-4 years of age that have never been bred.

Now I'll be quizzing my vets to find out if it's the same here or not, and if not, why not? You see, to quote a book written here by two vets, under Pyometra it says (quote) It is a condition occurring usually in middle-aged or older , unspayed females. It is more common in bitches that have never had pups. (end quote). I have never myself had a pyometra in a young bitch.
I just Googled a bit and while the second site here mentions 4 years and over it also mentions certain breeds are predisposed to it, so I suppose if you have a lot of those in your area that could maybe explain why you see so many cases in younger females? I couldn't be bothered checking out more sites as most say basically what I did in the first place, ....(and this is a quote too)

Pyometra may occur in young to middle-aged dogs; however, it is most common in older dogs.


I just realised that if it was so common in young females here then there wouldn't be too many bitches competing in even Intermediate Bitch class (18 months and under 36 months)at our shows, let alone Open classes where they are older again, or Veteran, and there are, so yes, makes me curious about why they get it so young in Canada. :confused:


http://www.squidoo.com/pyometra
http://www.ivis.org/proceedings/wsava/2006/lecture24/Arnold1.pdf?LA=1

erykah1310
April 26th, 2011, 06:59 AM
I dont think it happens more here but clearly as by our over population problems SO many people leave their dogs intact for no reason other than to "save money" also most people dont have a clue what to expect from an unaltered female other than them getting their "period" ( which completely makes me cringe when people post that)

If I dont breed this year ( which it is leaning that way right now) Karma will be spayed late next summer (depending on shows ect), she's going to be 4 this fall, which means clearly her next heat will be when she is 5 years old which I am not comfortable breeding at that age personally.


Non registered dogs are altered here, cats are altered and male horses are gelded as well, why not spare them those additional health concerns and protect your pocket book by doing so? If spaying a horse was an option believe me I would have Miss Fe spayed rather than trying to deal with a cranky mare in heat all freaken summer.

BenMax
April 26th, 2011, 07:20 AM
If spaying a horse was an option believe me I would have Miss Fe spayed rather than trying to deal with a cranky mare in heat all freaken summer.

:laughing: Can I relate to this! Try showing a mare in season....not fun.:laughing:

erykah1310
April 26th, 2011, 08:06 AM
^^^ Never! They get a wee bit too cranky, actually Miss Fe can be like Jekyl and Hyde, B vitamins kinda helps but I've tried them all, from the strawberry thing to that.

Melinda
April 26th, 2011, 08:25 AM
are you sure they can't be spayed?? I'm almost 98% positive our retired jumper was spayed before we received her, something about having to calm her down.

erykah1310
April 26th, 2011, 08:29 AM
Its a standing surgery and indeed quite risky

14+kitties
April 26th, 2011, 08:38 AM
Couple of things here -
Given the information we had in the first posting it's hard for us to ascertain what part of the world the poster comes from. I know I do not go back and do a search to see where the poster is from before trying to give a cohesive answer. I'm not sure many people do. :shrug: If the laws/animal welfare acts are different in the OPs part of the world it would be extremely helpful to have that information right from the start. JMO of course.
Also - just because the "normal" age for a pyometra to happen is over the age of four does not mean it does not happen to younger animals. It's possible these studies have been based on mean numbers. I know it does happen. I feel the best thing for the OP to do in this situation is to take her dog to the vet. We surely can not help with this problem. We are not vets. Again - just my opinion.
FYI - I reported this myself so if it isn't "done right" it can be taken down.

Love4himies
April 26th, 2011, 08:53 AM
:offtopic:
Kathryn, I agree we do have a very serious problem in North America. This is our problem. Nagini lives in Sweden, a country where pet overpopulation is virtually non-existent. In Sweden, they rarely spay or neuter their pets. It is their unquestioned societal norm for pet owners to control their pets' reproduction. They are obviously quite successful. :)



How did you know she was from Sweden:confused:??

And you are right about that society taking pet ownership very responsibly. Sigh, if only N America would do the same :( :sorry: :offtopic:

erykah1310
April 26th, 2011, 09:16 AM
Also - just because the "normal" age for a pyometra to happen is over the age of four does not mean it does not happen to younger animals. It's possible these studies have been based on mean numbers. I know it does happen. I feel the best thing for the OP to do in this situation is to take her dog to the vet. We surely can not help with this problem. We are not vets. Again - just my opinion.

I agree 100%

mikischo
April 26th, 2011, 09:51 AM
How did you know she was from Sweden:confused:??

And you are right about that society taking pet ownership very responsibly. Sigh, if only N America would do the same :( :sorry: :offtopic:

:offtopic:
Nagini has been a member of this forum for over two years although she does not post frequently. All it took was a quick search of previous posts to get a sense of who she was and where she lives. :)

Speaking of "off topic" I would love to see this thread get back on topic. Since none of us seems to have any insights as to possible reasons for the changes in skin pigmentation perhaps it would be best for us to wait for Nagini to get back to us. Perhaps if anyone wants to discuss further the pros and cons of spay/neuter of dogs, cats, horses, whatever, pet overpopulation in North America and elsewhere, etc, it might be a good idea for a new thread to be created to prevent further hijacking of Nagini's thread. Just my opinion. :shrug:

Back on topic: Nagini, please keep us updated on how Lily is doing.

:goodvibes::goodvibes: :fingerscr:fingerscr that it is nothing too serious.

Shaykeija
April 26th, 2011, 10:04 AM
:lightbulb: have a vet look at your dog and make a diagnosis. I would be interested on what the vet has to say. I hope it is nothing life threatening...

Goldfields
April 26th, 2011, 10:05 AM
Wow! All you have to do is Google dark pigment in canine skin and it comes up with this...

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2111&aid=425

amongst plenty of others, but this one I bookmarked for a start. Hope the problem is nothing serious.

14+kitties
April 26th, 2011, 11:20 AM
Wow! All you have to do is Google dark pigment in canine skin and it comes up with this...

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2111&aid=425

amongst plenty of others, but this one I bookmarked for a start. Hope the problem is nothing serious.

There are a lot of things on that list that should be checked by a vet. They, in most cases because we do not have experience with breeding, vetting, etc., can be life threatening. They need to be checked by a qualified, educated vet.

Nagini
April 26th, 2011, 12:25 PM
Wow. A lot of replies. Thank you for showing interest in my post!

But it is quite unnecessary to point out several times to me that I need to spay my dog. I know there are people out there who do not spay their their animals for whatever reasons. Spaying Lily is in high priority here, but it will have to wait until I have the means to do it. I do nonetheless appreciate the care you show towards my pet, when you care about her spaying.

I do have to say, I might have overreacted about her nipple coloring. It has darkened a little, but not as much as I thought it had. It was quite dim the other day when I noticed it, and now in sunlight it looks rather normal. She is brindle, so she has dark and light stripes on her skin under her fur. She is growing hair on her stomach, and she has gotten darker stripes there, where she is starting to grow darker hair. I think it is this, that caught my attention.

She seems to be going in heat any day now, many signs point towards that fact. She is still as happy-chappy as ever, just a little mellower and more cuddly.

Anyway, pyometra:
I looked it up, but I doubt that is it. Im no professional, of course. She acts as any dog approaching her heat, and her day-to-day behaviour is NORMAL. I am not bothered by pyometra.

My boyfriend brought my back to reality a little, he thinks I am overreacting a little. (What can I say? I care too much!:sorry: I give her almost fullbody examinations every day to check out any abnormalities. And anything strange I find will result in a post to pets.ca/forum and several hours of googling...) I will keep an eye on her behaviour, but I have a feeling she is just groing through a very rough heat cycle now again.. Hopefully it is just her heat approaching!

Dog Dancer
April 26th, 2011, 12:56 PM
Nagini, I'm glad that you are comfortable with the changes you have seen in your pup. I am a bit concerned that when you have a concern over her health you come to pets.ca first. Not a bad thing to check it out here, as we have many very knowledgeable people on the board, however, please remember we are not vets and cannot see the dog. If you have a concern over your dogs health you really should be seeing a vet. I understand it's not always financially easy, but it is an obligation as a pet owner to be prepared to deal with that. Good luck to your pup with her heat.

lUvMyLaB<3
April 26th, 2011, 01:08 PM
I am happy that she seems to be well. I do think that it is important that you maybe talk to a vet? the internet really is not a good place to try a self diagnose our pets, it can be a very dangerous thing to do. I understand the temptation as there are many people that may have experienced something similar and the price of vet visits. but no 2 situations are the same and typing about it in no way compares to a vet having hands and eyes on the animal. good luck with your pup, i hope you are able to find the means to have her spayed soon!

ScottieDog
April 26th, 2011, 01:33 PM
Spaying Lily is in high priority here, but it will have to wait until I have the means to do it. I do nonetheless appreciate the care you show towards my pet, when you care about her spaying.

Nagini, I've been following this thread but haven't had any experience with darkened nipples so haven't replied. After your update, I did want to let you know that a few years back, I was given the chance to bring a beautiful 2 1/2 year-old Scottie girl into my family. She was a dog the breeder had kept, but decided that, due to a small confirmation flaw, she was not breeding quality. I met this sweet dog right as she was going into her heat cycle, but was not allowed to bring her home until several weeks later. She was spayed about a month after the heat cycle ended and her surgery and recovery were totally uneventful. She is laying next to me right now, belly up and it is nearly impossible to see her spay incision since she healed so well. At 2 1/2 Lily should have a rapid recovery when she has her surgery. The hardest part really is keeping her still and working through your worries. Good luck.

In the U.S. we have special spay/neuter clinics that perform the surgeries for a lesser cost. I don't know if something like this is available in your country, but it would be worth checking into.

Nagini
April 26th, 2011, 01:51 PM
Thank you everyone, but yet again; Lily getting spayed is not what I asked about in this post.

No harm meant, I need to say this, since it seems unclear:
I love my dog, I see it is more like a responsibility I have over the dogs life. So I have a responsibility over my dog, but I also have limitations which I can not effect. Do not judge. I do all I can and everything I can for her. I do not like when I get the feeling that others hint otherwise. So don't misunderstand me, just because I havent done things the way that would be called "perfect" and "desirable".

I am here to ask questions about dog health, like the discussion group is called. If I post here often about her problems, it does not mean I do not go to a vet for a consultation! I do have a limit, when I turn to the forum or when I turn to a vetenarian, naturally.

ScottieDog,
I'm glad things went wonderfully with your scottie! And about Lily recovering fast from the surgery, sorry, I seem to not understand the point of this fact? However, I have not heard anything about these kinds of clinics that perform the surgery for lesser cost. I do not think they have them here in Sweden.

This has been off-topic now.:offtopic:

Yet again to turn TO the topic, I will keep an eye on her heat! She seems to be very lively actually now, that we get more sun over here in Sweden! It has been quite dark and rainy here for a few months!:thumbs up

Ill fix some pictures in a few hours for you all! She is a little sweetie. :lovestruck:

hazelrunpack
April 26th, 2011, 04:29 PM
I'm glad she seems to be feeling a little friskier, Nagini. :D We're getting a fair amount of gloomy wet weather here, as well...some sun would be nice!! And I'd love to see some updated pics of Lily!

Sylvie
April 26th, 2011, 07:35 PM
I'd love to see some pictures of Lilly also. :offtopic: Did you send the rainy, gloomy weather our way ?:laughing::laughing:

Goldfields
April 26th, 2011, 09:18 PM
Yet again to turn TO the topic, I will keep an eye on her heat! She seems to be very lively actually now, that we get more sun over here in Sweden! It has been quite dark and rainy here for a few months!:thumbs up

Ill fix some pictures in a few hours for you all! She is a little sweetie. :lovestruck:

Nagini, maybe she's just got a little sun tan on her belly? :D Does the sun reflect off the snow?

Nagini
April 27th, 2011, 02:49 AM
In the bus
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_WrYhvnSoyb8/TbfJspNoxZI/AAAAAAAAAvM/bWeGOg1kd5U/IMG_0717.jpg

After a long, hard walk
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_WrYhvnSoyb8/TbfJtmg7AnI/AAAAAAAAAvQ/dYldANLADMQ/s512/IMG_0847.jpg

Out in the open
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_WrYhvnSoyb8/TbfJuC2OlrI/AAAAAAAAAvU/VKazL2F1_ao/IMG_0876.jpg

Exploring the tree
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_WrYhvnSoyb8/TbfJu3I-k-I/AAAAAAAAAvY/fXLwg1efHKU/s512/IMG_0899.jpg

Melinda
April 27th, 2011, 04:12 AM
oh my, she is a beauty!! I love love love brindle dogs.

Love4himies
April 27th, 2011, 06:38 AM
Oh my she certainly is quite the beauty :cloud9: :lovestruck:

The pic of her on the bus, was that a public transportation bus?

hazelrunpack
April 27th, 2011, 08:20 AM
Lily has grown into a lovely lady, Nagini! :lovestruck: Love the chasing pic! Looks like she's having a ball! :D

Nagini
April 27th, 2011, 11:58 AM
Thank you Melinda and hazelrunpack! She is my pride and joy. :lovestruck:

The pic of her on the bus, was that a public transportation bus?

Yes it is. Why do you wonder? :)

Love4himies
April 27th, 2011, 12:13 PM
Yes it is. Why do you wonder? :)

There was another thread about a lady getting bitten by a dog in a store herein Canada and some members stated that dogs shouldn't be in stores/restaurants, etc, etc. I have lived in Germany for a total of 7 years and frequently saw dogs in gasthaus's and stores with absolutely no problems. The dogs were very, very well behaved and it was a joy to have them around. ;)

I take it in Sweden they are allowed on public buses.

marko
April 27th, 2011, 01:17 PM
Nagini- What a beautiful dooger you have!

erykah1310
April 27th, 2011, 01:27 PM
wow, she is really beautiful <3

mikischo
April 27th, 2011, 04:40 PM
Love all the pics. Lily is an absolutely gorgeous girl! :cloud9:

Sylvie
April 27th, 2011, 05:41 PM
Yes, she is beautiful.:lovestruck: Thank you for posting the pictures so fast:thumbs up

dbg10
April 27th, 2011, 05:59 PM
Lily is gorgeous Nagini :lovestruck:

Hope you find everything is all right after your scare. It may have been just the lighting at the time too. :fingerscr :thumbs up :grouphug:

Nagini
April 28th, 2011, 03:26 AM
There was another thread about a lady getting bitten by a dog in a store herein Canada and some members stated that dogs shouldn't be in stores/restaurants, etc, etc. I have lived in Germany for a total of 7 years and frequently saw dogs in gasthaus's and stores with absolutely no problems. The dogs were very, very well behaved and it was a joy to have them around. ;)

I take it in Sweden they are allowed on public buses.

Interesting! But here in Sweden, I don't find the general public very dog friendly, it could be also because of my dogs size and looks - we get a lot of trouble even though she never does anything and behaves so well. I've lived in Finland most of my life actually, and they are a VERY dog friendly community. Not here.

Buses are almost the only public place dogs are allowed in here, so I take advantage of this right to the fullest! :goodvibes: (I do that with train stations, too.) It is a good way for people to be around dogs in public places without anything happening - specially with a big dog. (EDIT: Good way for Lily to get used to people, too. Specially people who are a bit hesitant and not happy about her presence!) People don't like "tough" dogs, but she is a very well behaved one and should not be judged because of old prejudices!

Around our neighborhood, everything we do and everywhere we go results in new rules and new, big, red signs "DOGS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO DO...." :yell:

But thank you everyone! I'm happy you all like her! She is an amazing personality. :)

mikischo
April 28th, 2011, 03:36 PM
Interesting! But here in Sweden, I don't find the general public very dog friendly, it could be also because of my dogs size and looks - we get a lot of trouble even though she never does anything and behaves so well. I've lived in Finland most of my life actually, and they are a VERY dog friendly community. Not here.

People don't like "tough" dogs, but she is a very well behaved one and should not be judged because of old prejudices!

Sadly, you would likely encounter similar fears from some people here in Canada. People who are unfamiliar with the breed could mistake a Presa Canario for a very large Pitbull. There are laws banning Pitbulls and similar looking breeds in many cities here in Canada as well as in the entire province of Ontario. This is wrong and many people are working hard, particularly in Ontario, to have the bans repealed but so far with limited success. Hopeful this will change here soon.

Again, you have a very beautiful girl there and every reason to be proud of her. :thumbs up