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Rant: Why are dog food storage containers so ugly?

Sib.HuskyMom
March 25th, 2011, 08:15 PM
Seriously, why is it so hard to find a nice decorative way to store a 25lb bag of dry dog food?
I'm tired of keeping the big ugly rubbermaid storage container hidden away so that no one sees it.
I mean, everywhere you look, in every pet store you go in to, there are dozens of options for beautiful and stylish pet dishes, so it's easy to find one to match the style of your home's decor.

So why isn't the same true for the pet food storage???

I wouldn't mind having it on display in the corner of my kitchen if I could find a nice large (even clear glass) container with an air tight lid. But good luck trying to find something like that.

Sigh. What can you do? :shrug:

cell
March 25th, 2011, 08:24 PM
create your own niche market? Business opportunity...?!

kathryn
March 25th, 2011, 08:27 PM
Try Amazon...? I dunno, where I work we have different kinds :shrug: Most people opt for the clear ones.. I don't really think they are too ugly. The one my cats dry food is in is a clear, tall plastic thing on wheels with a blue locking lid. Nothing fancy but I wouldn't say ugly.

mummummum
March 25th, 2011, 08:36 PM
I suppose it depends on one's idea of "decor"...:D

I keep my kibble in the kitchen in one of those large aluminium trash cans in the kitchen and imho, it looks quite stylish.

Sib.HuskyMom
March 25th, 2011, 08:54 PM
Fair enough, everyone has a different idea of how things should look.

I did find an adorable storage container that's designed to look like a wooden barrel, but it's flat on one side so it fits tight against the wall. I absolutely love it! But it really doesn't go with the style of my new kitchen :(

However I really like your idea MMM and found something similar online.

And Cell, I only Wish I was that creative. :laughing:
But if you'd like to take the initiative, I'll be your first customer ;)

Winston
March 25th, 2011, 08:54 PM
You could check out these! I like the fire hydrant on page 3 :thumbs up

We purchased a tin can that was decorated with dogs from the pet store. All I do is change the liner (plastic heavy duty bag) each time and its lasted years.


http://www.nextag.com/Home-Garden--zzpet+food+storage+containerz2700400z3zBmz5---html

Etown_Chick
March 25th, 2011, 09:58 PM
I keep it in a plastic stacker drawer thingie on wheels - different drawers for different dog-related things. Maybe it's ugly, never really thought about it.

mummummum
March 25th, 2011, 10:27 PM
NO 'fuglies' in our kitchen please.

Hmmmm....this could be a project for you Sib ~ have us all take pix of our dog/ cat/snake (okay...they eat live prey, maybe not snake...) containers.

rainbow
March 25th, 2011, 10:45 PM
I just wanted to add if anybody is using plastic bins to store their pet food make sure it is food grade plastic .....if it isn't then leave the kibble in the bag and and put the bag in the container. If plastic isn't food grade then the chemicals from it can leach into the food over time.

SamIam
March 25th, 2011, 11:20 PM
I just wanted to add if anybody is using plastic bins to store their pet food make sure it is food grade plastic.
How would I know if my containers are food grade plastic?

rainbow
March 25th, 2011, 11:37 PM
How would I know if my containers are food grade plastic?

There's triangles on the bottom with numbers in them. I *think* that numbers 2, 4 & 5 are the safe ones ....you can google to make sure.

SamIam
March 25th, 2011, 11:44 PM
There's triangles on the bottom with numbers in them. I *think* that numbers 2, 4 & 5 are the safe ones ....you can google to make sure.

K. Let me just check... no number at all. I'm guessing that's bad?

hazelrunpack
March 26th, 2011, 09:11 AM
Probably, SamIam. These days, they mark the food-grade storage bins so you can tell what's safe to use. I think the biggest concern right now (though the culprits seem to shift as they do more studies :rolleyes:) are estrogen-mimickers like bisphenol A. They do tend to leach out of plastics over time.

An unmarked plastic storage bin is likely older (made before they started marking) or cheaper (we've got a few that were cheap, but not marked, so now they're storing seasonal trinkets. :D)

I guess they put BPA in metal, too, so you still have to be careful with things like stainless steel water bottles! :eek:

btw, I really like the looks of those containers, Sib.HuskyMom! :highfive:

cell
March 26th, 2011, 10:55 AM
I was told not to use a container for dog food because it leaves too much air in contact with the food. So I have been using a re-sealing bag that I can squeeze out as much air as possible before re-sealing. Not sure if it really makes a difference, I know some people go through food super fast so it is probably not a concern for them. My bags last 2-3 months so I keep some in the big bag and roll and tape it shut after filling the re-sealable bag which holds about a month worth.
If there is a bin that allows you to remove air before sealing then I would in interested.

mummummum
March 26th, 2011, 12:03 PM
:

btw, I really like the looks of those containers, Sib.HuskyMom! :highfive:

and what would YOU do with it? Hazel, we all figured you have a separate house just for the dog and bird food. :D

exkalibur
March 26th, 2011, 12:27 PM
I know why mine are so ugly too....It' my reflection that I'm looking at..:D

Etown_Chick
March 26th, 2011, 02:00 PM
rainbow, I never thought of that 'food grade' thing...will check it out right away. Thanks for the info.

SamIam
March 26th, 2011, 02:17 PM
An unmarked plastic storage bin is likely older (made before they started marking) or cheaper (we've got a few that were cheap, but not marked, so now they're storing seasonal trinkets. :D)

That's the one. They're ugly, too, but :shrug: for now that pretty much fits with the decor where they are. I've got 2 for dog food and about 20 for bird seed...

Bina
March 26th, 2011, 03:13 PM
I used to sell pet food and gave away many of those bonus plastic or metal food storage containers.
The store owner was savvy and we made sure to tell all customers that the bins were best used by keeping the food in the original bag and placing it in the container.
The original bags are designed for long term storage, don't leach chemicals, and should be changed with each new bag purchase.
If not using the original bag, then containers need to have a liner and be washed often.
Also, just as "Cell" pointed out, the amount of empty air space will affect the freshness and nutrient quality of the food over time.
My cat is so dang fussy that heaven forbid her dry food is not perfectly fresh...LOL....hubby knows this and makes sure that her bag is tightly closed with a big "chip clip". My other 2 cats are not so fussy, but we store their food the same way; in the original bag with a clip and then in another bin.
When I had big dogs we used to stand their bag in a tall Rubbermaid bin or in a large lidded white bucket which I had applied MacTac decorator paper onto....that's about the extent of my craft abilities. ;)
50 pounds of bird seed goes into rubbermaid bins in back of kitchen. Not so pretty, but I give up. ;)

hazelrunpack
March 26th, 2011, 04:45 PM
Our bird seed is stored in metal cans in the shed. Our dog food is in food grade plastic in the dog closet. In both cases, there's such a huge turnaround that none of it sits for more than a few days! :laughing: We just keep putting in new bags...

SamIam
March 26th, 2011, 05:06 PM
With about a dozen different seeds to store plus 2 kinds of dog food, I just went for convenience and cost over looks and never even thought about some plastics being unsuitable for food. I can only order 25 or 50 pound bags, so some kinds I go through quickly, but some of the oilseeds could be around for a year, and then it would be the greasy oilseeds and the dog food that would suck nasty chemicals out of the containers. Dog food I go through quickly, but each meal would be in there a few days. But without a number on the containers, I don't even know if they're unsafe or if I'm worrying over nothing!

luckypenny
March 26th, 2011, 05:18 PM
Seriously, why is it so hard to find a nice decorative way to store a 25lb bag of dry dog food?


Not sure about the decor in your kitchen/dining room but, you can always go to a second hand furniture store and find a nice night table. Remove the drawers, take off the boxy part of the drawers and just glue the faces back on. Flip upside down, add a piece of wood for the bottom. Then remove the top, add hinges to the backside, and re-attach to the dresser. You can find some nice small antique/retro dressers, especially after moving day at thrift shops.

mummummum
March 26th, 2011, 05:35 PM
What a great idea LP!

Longblades
March 26th, 2011, 07:01 PM
There's triangles on the bottom with numbers in them. I *think* that numbers 2, 4 & 5 are the safe ones ....you can google to make sure.I googled and found this: http://hubpages.com/hub/Safe-Plastics-Vs-Unsafe-Plastics Looks like numbers 1, 2, 4 and 5 "have no known health hazards." Which is not quite the same thing as being proven to be safe. If anyone finds a site that says which are known to be safe please post it?

Thanks for the numbers heads up by the way, I had no idea and thought all the triangle numbers meant something only for recycling.

lindapalm
March 26th, 2011, 07:24 PM
A friend of mine has several large dogs, she puts the dog food in a stainless steel garbage can, (the kind you step on the lever to open) I think she seals the bag inside. Goes great with the rest of her appliances.

luckypenny
March 26th, 2011, 07:35 PM
Found this, Longblades.

Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE): Principle raw materials: ethylene gas (monomer). Sometimes copolymerized with butene, hexane, octene, or vinyl acetate. Toxic chemicals used in production: benzene, chromium oxide, cumene hydroperoxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide.

High Density Polyethylene (HDPE): Principle raw materials: ethylene gas (monomer). Also frequently copolymerized with other olefins such as 1-butene, 1-hexane, or propylene. Toxic chemicals used in production: chromium oxide, benzoyl peroxide, hexane, cyclohexane.

Polypropylene (PP): Principal raw materials: propylene (monomer). Toxic chemicals used in production: methanol, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methyl phenol, nickel dibutyl dithiocarbamate.

Polystyrene (PS): Principal raw materials: Styrene (monomer). Most styrene is produced from ethylbenzene, which is itself made from benzene and ethylene. Toxic chemicals used in production: Styrene, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, polyvinyl alcohol, antimony oxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, bensoquinone.

Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET): Principal raw materials: terephthalic acid and/or dimethyl terephthalate and ethylene glycol. Toxic chemicals used in production: antimony oxide, diaszomethane, lead oxide.

Acrylonnitrile: Used as a key ingredient in the production of many synthetic fibers. It is also used as a monomer for two styrene resins (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, or ABS, and styrene-acrylonitrile, or SAN). Frequently copolymerized with polyvinyl chloride. Acrylonitrile has been shown to cause cancer and birth defects in laboratory animals and has been linked to an increase in cancer among exposed workers. Antimony Oxide: A crystaline substance used as a catalyst in the polmerization of PET, as a flame retardant in polystyrene, and as a pigment (white). A suspected carcinogen. May cause birth defects.

Benzene: used as a solvent in the production of PVC and LDPE and as a raw material for styrene, the chemical (monomer) used to make polystyrene. A recognized human carcinogen that causes leukemia. Acute exposure to benzene in the workplace depresses the central nervous system, causing headaches, fatigue, insomnia, nervousness, nausea and loss of muscular coordination. p-Benzoquinone: used as a retardant in the polymerization of polystyrene. Extremely toxic on ingestion. A suspected tumoragen and mutagen. t-Butyl Hydroperoxide: used as a radical initiator in the polymerization of polystyrene and linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE). Although the toxic hazard to humans is not know, has produced severe depression, incoordination, cyanosis, and respiratory arrest in laboratory animals. Carbon Tetrachloride: used in the polymerization of PVC and polystyrene and as a solvent for other resins. Causes cancer in laboratory animals. Suspected human carcinogen. Workers subject to prolonged or repeated exposure can develop severe liver and kidney failure. Chromium (VI) Oxide: uses as a catalyst in the polymerization of HDPE and LDPE. Has produced both cancer and mutagenic and teratogenic effects in laboratory animals. Chronic exposures in the workplace have led to severe liver and nervous system damage. Cumene Hydroperoxide: used as a radical initiator in the polymerization of LDPE. Acutely toxic by ingestion, inhalation, and skin absorbtion. A suspected mutagen and terotogen. Diazomethane: used in the polymerization of PET. A known animal carcinogen. 1,2-Dichloroethane: used as a solvent in the production of PVC. Extremely toxic by ingestion or inhalation. A suspected human carcinogen and mutagen. Dimethylphthalate: used as a plasticizer in PVC. Listed as a hazardous waste

Di-N-Butyl Phthalate: used as a plasticizer in PVC. Listed as a hazardous waste. Di-N-Octyl Phthalate: Used as a plasticizer in PVC. Listed as a hazardous waste. Ethylene Oxide: used in the manufacture of ethylene glycol (a raw material for PET) and acrylonitrile. Has caused cancer, changes in genetic material, and reproductive problems in laboratory animals.

http://www.ecologycenter.org/iptf/toxicity/dontbuyplastics.html


After looking up each individual type of plastic, they all have some possible toxicity when used to store food/liquid (amongst other uses)...some just more than others.

I just looked at the water bottles used for our dispenser...#7 :yuck:.

SamIam
March 26th, 2011, 08:29 PM
Thanks for those links longblades and lucky penny!
My containers have the code PP on them, which is equivalent of code 5 according to this page (http://hubpages.com/hub/Safe-Plastics-Vs-Unsafe-Plastics), no known health hazards, which is probably as close to a "safe" rating as you can get.:thumbs up

luckypenny
March 26th, 2011, 09:07 PM
Health concerns of (5) Polypropylene or PP:

In 2008, researchers in Canada asserted that quaternary ammonium biocides and oleamide were leaking out of certain polypropylene labware, affecting experimental results.[22] Since polypropylene is used in a wide number of food containers such as those for yogurt, Health Canada media spokesman Paul Duchesne, said the department will be reviewing the findings to determine whether steps are needed to protect consumers.[23]

The Environmental Working Group classifies PP as of low to moderate hazard.[24]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polypropylene

mummummum
March 26th, 2011, 09:16 PM
Yikes eh LP? That's our yoghurt, cottage cheese, margarine...

luckypenny
March 26th, 2011, 09:26 PM
Yikes eh LP? That's our yoghurt, cottage cheese, margarine...

:shrug: Buy butter instead of margarine? Transfer yogurt and cottage cheese to glass jars/pyrex dishes?

We use a lot of plastic here, mainly for freezing the dogs' homecooked/raw meals. :lightbulb: I've finally found a use for all the spaghetti mason jars dh has been hoarding. Can glass be frozen without chances of it exploding in the freezer though :confused:?

Longblades
March 27th, 2011, 07:37 AM
Can glass be frozen without chances of it exploding in the freezer though ?Yes if you leave a good air space for the frozen stuff to expand into. http://www.ehow.com/how_5809669_freeze-food-glass-jars.html I like to leave more than the measurements suggested.