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While waiting for your Spring gardens.....

Goldfields
March 7th, 2011, 09:06 AM
.....just a few from my Autumn garden, though there won't be much. I hate the thought that your flowers are still aways off for you.


The Gaura amidst the petunias. Petunias are great value here, they seem to flower for a ridiculously long time.

Then two David Austin roses, Brother Cadfael and Grace.

Love4himies
March 7th, 2011, 09:06 AM
I don't think Spring is ever going to come :(.

Thanks for sharing those beautiful flowers :lovestruck:

Goldfields
March 7th, 2011, 09:18 AM
Salvia Hot Lips. Some flowers are red, some white, some red and white.

I have Alyssum along the front of many of the rose beds, it smells beautiful.

The rose Regensburg.

Hi L4H, I'm nearly off to bed but wouldn't have a clue what the time is where you are.

Melinda
March 7th, 2011, 09:26 AM
ohhhh Grace!! I'd love to get some of those, I'm grace the 5th and my daughter the 6th.....what lovely flowers you have...makes me long for spring

Goldfields
March 7th, 2011, 09:27 AM
You need to look for it but there is a blue salvia here on the left blending in with the petunia colours.

A humble geranium.

Some yellow(ish) petunias.

Goldfields
March 7th, 2011, 09:41 AM
Melinda, my mother's name was Grace so I just had to have that one. Yes, you'd be looking ahead, while I am getting depressed because I know there won't be many flowers at all during Autumn/Winter here. :(

Lady of Meginch, described as a rosette type. It is certainly apt.

Lichfield Angel, next to the above. They have flowered repeatedly , a wonderful pair.

Finally a little Aster.

There is a flood warning here, darn it! Heavy rain tomorrow and the next day. I am getting sick of these tropical storms extending from coast to coast like they have this Summer. It is very humid here tonight. I shouldn't complain though when a friend in Queensland got a text message and a landline call today telling them they should consider evacuating. I am praying they stay safe seeing she won't leave her home.

Inthedoghouse
March 7th, 2011, 09:59 AM
Where in the world are flowers blooming right now? Australia?
We probably won't see a hint of colour until April here in Northern Ontario.
Those roses pictured are beautiful..... my favourite
J.

Many flowers have I seen
The rose is a good'un
But give to me the good old flour
That makes a Yorkshire puddin'

Dog Dancer
March 7th, 2011, 01:59 PM
Yes Goldfields lives in Australia! While we're enduring our winter bleakness she fills our screens with beautiful flowers. Hope your friend manages well with the flooding Goldfields, and that you don't get any yourself.

Inthedoghouse
March 7th, 2011, 05:43 PM
oh thanks DogDancer..... I've never had the pleasure of going to see Australia but my daughters have and love it. Yes, even a picture of flowers cheers us up this time of year!

lindapalm
March 7th, 2011, 05:59 PM
Definately gets you excited about whats to come. In New York we got a really good thaw, and actually had more grass than snow. Not for long, were back to 12 inches of white.

Goldfields
March 7th, 2011, 07:20 PM
Inthedoghouse, I'm in Victoria(bottom right state on mainland Australia), they call it, funnily enough, the garden state. Not that appropriate for where I am, we are temperate verging on being semi arid. This Summer just gone is about the best anyone can recall though, quite wet, warm and humid, which did marvels for the garden.
Dog Dancer, things could get amusing from here on in. Everyone's dams are full and when runoff can't get into our house dam I'm not sure where it's going to go. :D I'll phone my friend later and see whether the floods reached her property.

Now, following our last lot of rain comes Zephyranthes candida(windflower, Zephyr Lily, Rain Lily). Following today's rain a lot more might flower.

Some different coloured Statice, another good value plant, flowers for a long time.

Red Nerines.

Goldfields
March 7th, 2011, 07:52 PM
The first one is my white Buddleja. I have just bought Buddleja Black Knight (dark purple) but it's only tiny yet. If I can get hold of a mauve one and a yellow one I'd be very pleased.
At the head of my Tammy's grave :angel2:, the rose 'Pegasus'.
Then Cabana starting its Autumn flush.

Goldfields
March 7th, 2011, 08:07 PM
On my darling Susie's grave, Best Friend.
Makybe Diva bud.
One of my blue salvias.

Goldfields
March 19th, 2011, 10:28 PM
3 roses. Ashram, Belle Story and Grace again.

Goldfields
March 19th, 2011, 10:38 PM
And another 3. The Dark Lady, showing how she changes colour as she ages. The Pilgrim, and the always beautiful Pierre de Ronsard.

Goldfields
March 19th, 2011, 10:58 PM
For a change of pace, my first Crinum Mooreei flower. So graceful, and the perfume is nice too.
The Pandorea jasminoides vine on one of the tank stands.
And now, this last flowering shrub is a total mystery and if you can identify it I'd be rapt. I have posted this on the garden forum and sent it to The Diggers Club, and so far no ID on it. It was given to me, so no name tag unfortunately. Sent this particular photo to show the size of the flowers in comparison to my hand.

SamIam
March 20th, 2011, 12:46 AM
Beautiful, Goldfields, wow! Maybe they were in your yard when they decided to call it the garden state!

Goldfields
March 20th, 2011, 02:26 AM
Nice of you to say so, Sam, but no, this garden is only a result of a fluke wet summer. Two years ago we came out of 13 years of drought, so bad that farm dams were not filled, only house dams, via a channel system, and with the storages locally down finally to about 3% capacity. During the drought I had no grass at all at times, just bare dirt where I exercised my dogs. Then Queensland got a wonderful wet season which sent flood waters down through the centre of Australia to fill Lake Eyre, and I believed the local plant nursery owner who said that we'd get good weather once Lake Eyre filled, so I guess I've gone on a real spending spree for the garden since the drought broke. :D Haven't a clue what will happen next Summer, so I will just enjoy it all while I can.

TeriM
March 20th, 2011, 02:05 PM
Beautiful pictures Goldfields :lovestruck:.

We are in spring here on the west coast but some of those central and east coast could still be a while. I've noticed a bunch of cherry trees in blossom this week and I have lots of things budding new growth in my garden.

SamIam
March 20th, 2011, 03:22 PM
Well, Goldfields, I sure hope the next few years do you well so you don't lose all the beautiful new ones you've put in!

For your amusement, here is a section of my spring garden as it stands on the vernal equinox. This tray is pansies.:laughing::laughing:
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shirley1011
March 20th, 2011, 07:22 PM
Goldfields, with all the wet weather you have there this year, how do you manage to not have any black spot on your roses.....all it does is rain here a few days and poof I have block spot all over the leaves? Do you have a secret you could share?

Goldfields
March 20th, 2011, 07:34 PM
Thanks, TeriM. Great news that finally Spring is nearly there. Share your photo's, please. It's interesting to see what grows there, though I do get envious. :D I just realised the other day that I'm one of those people who goes through a plant catalogue and decides she'd like every plant in her garden. Is that an addiction, or what? :eek: :rolleyes: (Haven't told my husband yet what I've ordered from the last catalogue. :laughing: It'd be cheaper to take up smoking again.)

SamIam, that's an interesting way to grow pansies, are they peat pots? I am just so totally hooked on growing plants from seed. I did 32 punnets the other day. We're out of milk, so whoever goes to town can bring back some more seed raising mix, I'm sure there is more I can plant yet. I guess you could easily get Spring annuals started there by using a sunny windowsill? Thinking of which, I should go out and see if my seedlings need water.

SamIam
March 20th, 2011, 08:25 PM
It's a handy little set-up, sphagnum peat wrapped in biodegradable mesh, comes as a dehydrated coin that expands when you add water, the tray is reusable, so very handy and nothing wasted. Each variety of seed goes in a certain period of time (up to 12 weeks) before the last frost date, so they'll be the right size and maturity when you put them in the ground. I've never done as much as this year (will be 36 dozen plants), but last year I would have been eligible for "sorriest attempt", so I'm stepping up towards "worthy of looking."

Dee-O-Gee
March 20th, 2011, 10:31 PM
I like the Pilgrim and it's little follower. :)

Thank you so much GF for sharing your beautiful gardens. :cloud9: It's been so nice throughout the winter months to pop on here and see your astounding variety of fresh foliage and blooms. :thumbs up

It was such a beautiful sunny day here today that I tended to my gardens with a yearly spring dormant Lime/Sulphur spray. Hoping that this will control any winter bugs/disease before any damage occurs.

Heck, with your gardens throughout all our winter and our gardens throughout your winter, we can all have a beautiful bouquet all year round! :thumbs up

Goldfields
March 20th, 2011, 10:37 PM
Sorry, Shirley,1011, I didn't see your post earlier. I got sidetracked, upping the insurance on my dog trailer. They've increased in price by $2,500 since I got mine.:eek:
I do get black spot, also, to a much lesser degree, powdery mildew. The latter only seems to effect (umm, dark red rose, ummm ... having a senior moment here) Papa Meilland. I have two plants of that rose, the one protected by the house gets the powdery mildew, the one out in the breeze doesn't. So, with my garden big and open, I think that's why I don't get that much black spot either, roses need light and air around them. For powdery mildew I use a milk and water spray, for blackspot one of those sprays you can buy for a number of purposes, aphids , black spot etc..
:laughing: I hate to admit this, SamIAm, my sister gave me some of those coin thingies and I didn't realise they expanded so threw them out. :shrug: :D Duh! They looked useless to me. Now you know who's useless.:rolleyes: So what did you plant other than pansies?

Goldfields
March 20th, 2011, 11:03 PM
Kiss Me Quick - proper name Centranthus ruber.
Buddleja 'Black Knight'.
A lovely David Austin rose, William Morris

SamIam
March 20th, 2011, 11:20 PM
:laughing: Not your fault, Goldfields, new equipment ought to have come with instructions, otherwise they just look like a chunk of dried dirt!

Let's see... I've got the pansies, petunias, snapdragons, carnations, pink pampas grass, trailing petunias and trailing begonias. Don't know if you grow zonal geraniums from seed, but I didn't find any. I also got sweet peas for the fence, you're not supposed to start them indoors but last year I got two flowers after first frost and nothing before, so I think I'll give them a head start anyway. They'll all get mixed in out there with super-hardy bulbs and perennials. I have an ant problem killing off some of my plants every year, hope I can finally get that fixed.

What's winter like where you are, as far as the garden goes?

Goldfields
March 20th, 2011, 11:32 PM
This dainty one is Limonium latifolium - Fairy Statice- and the colour is Emile Blue.
Next is just a succulent, can't tell you its name.
Finally, a rose named Seduction.

Goldfields
March 21st, 2011, 12:06 AM
The Pilgrim is a lovely rose, I agree, klm. Some of them are so photogenic that I bless the digital camera being invented. I thought my old Sony Mavica was good, just using floppies, but I go nuts with a digital. :D Still, the Mavica is good for short doggy videos.
I am looking forward to your Spring/Summer gardens. There is usually very little flowering here during Winter, but then I've put so many new things in, the garden might surprise me. We'll see.

SamIAm, they say if in doubt, read the instructions, but there were none. :D

Pink Pampas grass, that sounds nice, though here I think Pampas Grass has to be disposed of carefully from a garden , it can take off in the wild. I don't ever start my Sweet Peas outside. I put everything in punnets, otherwise ants or some other insect takes the seeds. Your garden should be a picture. Are you doing Petunias from seed? Don't they have microscopic seed? I only ever get them as seedlings because of that.

Shaykeija
March 21st, 2011, 12:47 AM
[QUOTE=SamIam;994871]:laughing: Not your fault, Goldfields, new equipment ought to have come with instructions, otherwise they just look like a chunk of dried dirt!

I also got sweet peas for the fence, you're not supposed to start them indoors but last year I got two flowers after first frost and nothing before, so I think I'll give them a head start anyway.QUOTE]

I start these inside and I am telling you they grow fine when you transplant them. Mine grow against my garage, up the wall and on to the roof. I also throw some seed down at the same time, just to expand the bloom time.

SamIam
March 21st, 2011, 12:56 AM
Your roses are so pretty, all of them! From my perspective, "very little flowering" in winter sounds pretty nice. Snow is over-rated. I'm not even close to a zone where pampas grass is considered a perennial. Sigh.

The regular petunias I think were tiny (snapdragons are tiny!), but the trailing are bigger. I think they're also coated so I don't know how much of the size is actually seed. Same with the begonias, as a couple are just up, if leaf size is any indication of seed size, they were tiny tiny tiny but coated. When you sell 10-12 for $5 instead of 100-300 for $2, I guess you have to make sure they're at least visible to the naked eye.

Supposedly sweet peas don't transplant well, but I think that risk is better than missing out on the flowers again. Maybe I'll do half and half.

SamIam
March 21st, 2011, 12:58 AM
I start these inside and I am telling you they grow fine when you transplant them. Mine grow against my garage, up the wall and on to the roof. I also throw some seed down at the same time, just to expand the bloom time.

How soon before frost do you start them?

Goldfields
March 21st, 2011, 01:24 AM
I'm with Shaykeija on this, SamIAm, I've had no trouble either way with Sweet Peas. Wish all plants were so easy peasy.
I've started taking seeds from bulb flowers now. So much for me to learn though. Oh, that reminds me, I have bulbs I must plant too.

Shaykeija
March 21st, 2011, 10:41 AM
I start them in April. Usually the second week. Then when they sprout, i move them to my porch during the day. (if not too cold) By the 2nd week in May, I have the windows open and harden them off. My husband usually plants them either on the long weekend in May or the first weekend in June. I also use the peat pellets to start these.

hazelrunpack
March 21st, 2011, 01:19 PM
Beautiful flowers, as always, GF. I was thrilled last week when I found some inch-high daylilies poking up through the snow and nyjer chaff I was raking out of the hummingbird garden. :D Amazing how a little green on a gloomy day can cheer the soul...

SamIam
March 21st, 2011, 01:23 PM
Thanks! I'll start half in April, then, along with my marigolds. (Forgot about the marigolds, but it's an old seed pack I found lying around, so germination rate won't be high). If you two are right, even *I* should get them to work. I'm still green at this. I'm all thumbs... shouldn't that add up to green thumbs?

exkalibur
March 21st, 2011, 01:48 PM
:offtopic:

Are you getting this snowstorm in Edmonton too SamIam ?

Ok. I saw your reply from my booboo post....sorry I misunderstood your location...Anyway, you guys are talking about gardening and I know it won't happen soon here...makes Momma a little cranky right now since she has some plants that she worked on all winter and really wants to put them in.

hazelrunpack
March 21st, 2011, 01:49 PM
My thumb is green, SamIam...but it's from the mold that takes over everything hazel touches! :laughing: Green thumbs aren't always what they're cracked up to be! :D

We can't plant till end of May, but I direct sow marigolds in the garden that last week before Memorial day and even with my moldy thumb I get pretty good germination rates. :thumbs up

hazelrunpack
March 21st, 2011, 01:50 PM
Snow today, Ex? We aren't supposed to get any till Wednesday...

SamIam
March 21st, 2011, 02:56 PM
:offtopic:
Are you getting this snowstorm in Edmonton too SamIam ?


Alright exkalibur, let me tell you something about snow.:mad:
I have baby birdies and they are hungry. Turn on the tap to mix up their food, and nothing but a slight hiss. The mains are so old here, this is about the millionth time this winter it's been shut off. So wonderful clean fresh snow and I am trying to be grateful for it as I investigate the proper microwave setting to turn one big scoop of snow into hot water.:mad:

I can't wait for my daffodils. Seems so far away yet. My marigolds are an X8 pack. Can't find a list of what year that code refers to. Most of my new ones are A1.

Goldfields
March 21st, 2011, 05:57 PM
You can't plant till the end of May, Hazel! That seems like forever, even to me.(who has some garden) Laughed @ your mouldy green thumb. Don't forget you are probably growing all the lovely perennial wildflowers that I am currently spending a fortune on. And daylilies coming up , that's really something to celebrate. I love them. I have self sown sweet peas coming up everywhere in the garden, do you think frosts will bowl them? Maybe I don't need to weed them out. (How lazy is that?)
Exkalibur, I get the shivers just hearing about your snow. Thought you may be interested to hear that my sister, after losing their second GSD and saying she couldn't go through that again, has been searching for another one. As I knew she would. A girlfriend up the road bought one recently so I sent her photo's, aren't I wicked? LOL.

aslan
March 21st, 2011, 06:07 PM
Alright exkalibur, let me tell you something about snow.:mad:
I have baby birdies and they are hungry. Turn on the tap to mix up their food, and nothing but a slight hiss. The mains are so old here, this is about the millionth time this winter it's been shut off. So wonderful clean fresh snow and I am trying to be grateful for it as I investigate the proper microwave setting to turn one big scoop of snow into hot water.:mad:

I can't wait for my daffodils. Seems so far away yet. My marigolds are an X8 pack. Can't find a list of what year that code refers to. Most of my new ones are A1.

jeez where abouts are you? remind me NOT to come there until atleast ummmm July.. We've got tulips peaking through so far and kinda greenish tinted mud...i mean grass..

SamIam
March 21st, 2011, 06:17 PM
You can't plant till the end of May, Hazel! That seems like forever, even to me.(who has some garden) Laughed @ your mouldy green thumb. Don't forget you are probably growing all the lovely perennial wildflowers that I am currently spending a fortune on. And daylilies coming up , that's really something to celebrate. I love them. I have self sown sweet peas coming up everywhere in the garden, do you think frosts will bowl them? Maybe I don't need to weed them out. (How lazy is that?)
Exkalibur, I get the shivers just hearing about your snow. Thought you may be interested to hear that my sister, after losing their second GSD and saying she couldn't go through that again, has been searching for another one. As I knew she would. A girlfriend up the road bought one recently so I sent her photo's, aren't I wicked? LOL.

:( Humph. Hazel just got me worried. I knew paint and gangreen were possibilities, but now I've got to consider mould as a possibility.:(
No. My sweet peas stayed green long after fall frosts. Of somewhere between that and 40 below they did die eventually, but it was a long time.
Good luck with your sister, I bet you'll win. Losing is very hard but emptiness is even harder.

Goldfields
March 21st, 2011, 06:56 PM
:( Humph. Hazel just got me worried. I knew paint and gangreen were possibilities, but now I've got to consider mould as a possibility.:(

:laughing::laughing: If it was this place at certain times of the year it'd be moss.
No. My sweet peas stayed green long after fall frosts. Of somewhere between that and 40 below they did die eventually, but it was a long time.
Good luck with your sister, I bet you'll win. Losing is very hard but emptiness is even harder.

That's good news about frost and sweet peas, I might just shift them into better places then.
I have to shop today so maybe I should take my camera along and take photo's of the GSD, Mars, that is at Petstock, for my sister I mean. :evil:

SamIam
March 22nd, 2011, 01:53 AM
If it was this place at certain times of the year it'd be moss.
That's good news about frost and sweet peas, I might just shift them into better places then.
I have to shop today so maybe I should take my camera along and take photo's of the GSD, Mars, that is at Petstock, for my sister I mean. :evil:

Could not find Mars on their website.

You will have to post pictures of your moss lol.

hazelrunpack
March 22nd, 2011, 12:24 PM
You can't plant till the end of May, Hazel! That seems like forever, even to me.(who has some garden) Laughed @ your mouldy green thumb. Don't forget you are probably growing all the lovely perennial wildflowers that I am currently spending a fortune on. And daylilies coming up , that's really something to celebrate. I love them.

Yep, traditional last day of frost is May 30 or 31, something like... People always try to jump the gun and plant mid-May--and then we get another frost and they have to do it all over again. :D hazel is too paranoid to fall for that, so she just waits till Memorial Day weekend to plant. :thumbs up

:( Humph. Hazel just got me worried. I knew paint and gangreen were possibilities, but now I've got to consider mould as a possibility.:(


Yep, sorry to say... Luckily, my thumb is the only place it's showed up! :laughing: So far :o

We have moss, too--yesterday's rain uncovered a lot of it and it's lookin' mighty fine covered in water and feeling hydrated. :D Today, we woke up to thunder snow, so it's rapidly being covered over again :rolleyes: We could get 6 -12 inches (15 - 30 cm) of snow, but I'm thinking the weather-guessers are wrong and we'll end up wit less. Whatever we get will melt quickly. It always does in March.

Goldfields
March 22nd, 2011, 09:13 PM
Traditional last day of frosts here might be Melbourne Cup day, the first Tuesday in November, as that's when they say you are safe to plant tomatoes. Had a little spend up in the garden section yesterday. Not much, about 5 punnets of pansies that they were putting out cheap because they looked tatty - they always come good and bloom like crazy - a white gaura(I only had the pink one), a new blue Salvia, a Penstemon named Firebird, and the dwarf agapanthus, Back in Black. Toby had to sneak into the Gaura photo - he compliments it anyway.:lovestruck: Next is the blue salvia, a bit fuzzy because of it was overcast. Final photo is one I learnt the name of while browsing the plant nursery, Salvia Phylis Fancy.

hazelrunpack
March 22nd, 2011, 09:25 PM
Toby looks good in the garden. :D

We have a native gaura here--biennial gaura. It's not nearly as showy as yours--the flowers are dinky--but it looks very similar. Unfortunately, I don't have any good pics of it...

Goldfields
March 22nd, 2011, 09:59 PM
Is it white, Hazel? This one is Guara lindheimeri, native to the USA -Mexico border area. A perennial I think. I love it, so dainty.
Tobes is a sweetie. Ian scared the daylights out of me the other day by coming in and telling me that Toby was crook again, not urinating properly .... he had a bladder stone op in the past ..... but I've watched him like a hawk since, and no, it's a nice stream.

rainbow
March 22nd, 2011, 10:13 PM
jeez where abouts are you? remind me NOT to come there until atleast ummmm July.. We've got tulips peaking through so far and kinda greenish tinted mud...i mean grass..

LOL ....no kidding. :D

I just looked today and I was amazed to see, with the crappy weather we've had, that the tulips are about 3 inches high. :D

SamIam
March 22nd, 2011, 10:14 PM
:dog: I hope he wasn't just holding it waiting for mommy to plant some new targets?

Goldfields
March 22nd, 2011, 10:43 PM
I can't wait to see your tulips, Rainbow. It's not cold enough here for them really.

Toby wouldn't do that, Sam, he's an angel. That's like saying birds don't fly. LOL.

We are getting some rain again today, just showers, though part of the state got 8 to 12 inches!! Must phone my sister to make sure they didn't get flooded. I just want it wet enough to make weeding easy, then you won't hear from me for a week. Ian said they think this La Nina weather pattern will be here for at least another 3 months so we will get warmer than usual weather. Probably more of the tropical weather. It's interesting at least, the growth on some trees is unbelievable.

Goldfields
March 23rd, 2011, 04:29 AM
Here is the crinum mooreei getting into stride.I love it and was worried it was sick seeing the leaves are dying, but according to my book that's what it does, thank heaven. The leaves die off while the flowers open. Sort of spoils the picture, and so does the damage the (?) slugs do to it.

hazelrunpack
March 23rd, 2011, 12:27 PM
Is it white, Hazel? This one is Guara lindheimeri, native to the USA -Mexico border area. A perennial I think. I love it, so dainty.


Well, it's mostly white with a pale pink wash that develops as it ages. The scientific name is Gaura biennis.

The Crinum mooreei looks like more like a large hosta blossom than a lily to me. Very pretty!!! :cloud9:

Goldfields
March 23rd, 2011, 09:04 PM
I googled Gaura biennis, biennial beeblossom they call it, what a lovely name. I think it looks as nice as the one I have. Biennial compared to perennial though, I prefer the latter.
I hate to admit this, I have never seen a Hosta. I must Google that also. Oh, it is too, Hazel, very like it. I wonder if Hostas would survive here? Yes, zone wise they'd be fine. They are the plantain lily, and the Crinum mooreei is the bush lily. Hostas might be even nicer, more flowers and more interesting foliage?

Criosphynx
March 23rd, 2011, 11:55 PM
love the salvias, I have lots of them here. Possibly my fav :)

since you seem to have the same/similar climate to me (lots of the same plants I noticed) I wouldn't imagine hostas would do good...i've never seen one in person... I researched them a while back, and arid didn't seem to fit their resume :p

Goldfields
March 24th, 2011, 01:22 AM
Yes, but nowadays we have water via a pipeline, and as everyone is saying, the main cost is not the water, it's other charges. We also have a full house dam courtesy of a wet Summer. I think I'd need to pick my spot very carefully - protect them from hot north winds - and keep an eye on them, but then same can be said for the Crinum, also Hippeastrums and Frangipanis I'm growing.
I would love to see photo's of your Salvias. They're great, aren't they? Love the aroma when you just brush against one like Salvia Hot Lips. We would have a similar climate, with California and Victoria (my state) being the two most bushfire prone places on the planet. :(

hazelrunpack
March 24th, 2011, 09:27 PM
I googled Gaura biennis, biennial beeblossom they call it, what a lovely name. I think it looks as nice as the one I have. Biennial compared to perennial though, I prefer the latter.
I hate to admit this, I have never seen a Hosta. I must Google that also. Oh, it is too, Hazel, very like it. I wonder if Hostas would survive here? Yes, zone wise they'd be fine. They are the plantain lily, and the Crinum mooreei is the bush lily. Hostas might be even nicer, more flowers and more interesting foliage?

The gaura reseeds pretty readily. Mine seems to have gotten crowded out by the 'feral' raspberry, though, or maybe just drowned in last summer's rain! :frustrated: Last year was the first year I didn't spot any. Might just be that it's there but won't be ready to bloom till this year, though, so I'll look for it again.

As for hostas, they love shade. Mine are in full sun but they require lots and lots of water and sun-scorch easily. The flowers are much smaller, I think, but the foliage is very interesting! All those huge leaves!

Criosphynx
March 24th, 2011, 09:35 PM
Yes, but nowadays we have water via a pipeline, and as everyone is saying, the main cost is not the water, it's other charges. We also have a full house dam courtesy of a wet Summer. I think I'd need to pick my spot very carefully - protect them from hot north winds - and keep an eye on them, but then same can be said for the Crinum, also Hippeastrums and Frangipanis I'm growing.
I would love to see photo's of your Salvias. They're great, aren't they? Love the aroma when you just brush against one like Salvia Hot Lips. We would have a similar climate, with California and Victoria (my state) being the two most bushfire prone places on the planet. :(

Here the city uses 20% of its electricity just to pump water to homes! So they charge a mint for it. I have the best garden on the block IMO and my water bill is almost nothing because of the rain catchment system.

do you collect rainwater? Its been very helpful here :)

I took pics just a week or so ago...I don't see any salvia in them tho...but you get the idea. I'll make a mental note to get pics of them next time

http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j310/Criosphynx/march%2010%202011/mar2011047.jpg

hazelrunpack
March 24th, 2011, 09:55 PM
Love your little buddy in the gate! :lovestruck:

Criosphynx
March 24th, 2011, 09:58 PM
don't let it fool you....


its evil inside... :p

Goldfields
March 24th, 2011, 10:44 PM
Love the look of that garden Criosphynx, I'll bet you've got some treasures tucked away that I'd like here. :thumbs up Yes, I catch rainwater, at the moment(because one 1,000 gallon tank needs relining) we have room for around 11,000 gallons, though we only use it for the house and emergencies, like during the drought when the dam was low. The house dam is for the garden and the toilets. It was flood filled this year, which is wonderful seeing the channel system they filled with in the past is not being used. Just being connected to the pipeline means a much bigger water bill, even if we don't use it, but we desperately needed this and they have to recoup the money spent on it.
Sweetie of a dog you have.

Criosphynx
March 25th, 2011, 10:19 AM
thanks everyone, I'll give Critter your compliments. Shes a fuzzy little beast.

Love the look of that garden Criosphynx, I'll bet you've got some treasures tucked away that I'd like here. :thumbs up Yes, I catch rainwater, at the moment(because one 1,000 gallon tank needs relining) we have room for around 11,000 gallons, though we only use it for the house and emergencies, like during the drought when the dam was low. The house dam is for the garden and the toilets. It was flood filled this year, which is wonderful seeing the channel system they filled with in the past is not being used. Just being connected to the pipeline means a much bigger water bill, even if we don't use it, but we desperately needed this and they have to recoup the money spent on it.
Sweetie of a dog you have.

:eek:

wow! Impressive. Makes my 400 gal system look like a joke :p I'd imagine you have a much bigger property size than I do tho, being that theres more people in my local county than in your entire country...we are crammed in like sardines here :p

Goldfields
March 25th, 2011, 10:59 AM
We have 5 acres, and lease another 5, Criosphynx. When we first shifted here we didn't have much storage, but our very kind neighbor used to let us get rainwater from his place, he had 17,000 gallons. Over time we decided to be self sufficient. During the long drought, when our dam went dry, the same neighbor loaned us a water tank so we could cart water out here from town for our stock. I don't know what we would have done without him at times.
My garden would obviously be bigger then yours , which to me only means a lot more work and more time needed for mowing, weeding, watering etc.. Sometimes smaller sounds very good to me. :D Dense populations sound okay too, I was City born and reared and tho' I have been here for 36 years, I still miss the City. :(

Goldfields
March 27th, 2011, 10:16 PM
Not much of March left now, almost a third of the way through Autumn here and no sign of it yet, no autumn leaves for instance. There isn't a great deal flowering, though I noticed that the roses are preparing for an Autumn flush. So far just the old faithfuls that repeat flower a lot. Iceberg, The Dark Lady and Crocus Rose.

Goldfields
March 27th, 2011, 10:24 PM
A Twilight Mist bud, some snapdragons, and Belle Story in the evening sunlight.

SamIam
March 27th, 2011, 10:48 PM
Not much of March left now, almost a third of the way through Autumn here and no sign of it yet, no autumn leaves for instance.

:laughing: It all balances out I suppose. I still have a good 60cm snow, some years the grass would be poking out already by now.

Goldfields
March 28th, 2011, 01:36 AM
That's a lot of snow, it'll be a while yet before you see Spring then. :( Your dogs must love it when they can finally have a run or roll on grass again. It's fairly warm here today(26.3C right now) and I was out watering , weeding, and planting perennials I got in the mail this morning and some pansies. I have bulbs to pot yet but will do it when I have the dogs out for exercise. Right now it's cool down/have a cup of coffee time. My evenings are taken up grooming dogs, the shelties are doing their big change of coat before Winter, or I'd pot the bulbs then.

shirley1011
March 28th, 2011, 08:36 PM
Being a failure in the rose dept, I am still wondering how you do it with so much wet weather...we get a rain and poof there's black spot everywhere.

I noticed some black spot on the picture with Toby & the gauia (not sure what they are..we don't have them here) ....so why there and not the roses...are you spraying with some miracle spray....if so I must get you to send me some...I need more help that you can imagine...we are having a garden wedding here late this summer and need to get my roses looking like yours!

Goldfields
March 28th, 2011, 10:19 PM
Shirley, when you say so much wet weather I have to explain that usually it is temperate to semi arid here, a 16 inch average annual rainfall(if we are lucky). Sydney would have 70 inches or more, and Queensland measures their rain in feet, not inches. Roses do NOT do well in Queensland. Or for some they don't anyway. What's your rainfall and when do you get it mainly?
Is your Black Spot a problem all the time?
Yes, the Gaura has some sort of problem. I'd only just bought it, don't know much about them myself, so don't know if this is Black Spot like roses get.
Do you remove all the rose leaves with Black Spot on them and put them in your trash? I know that sounds like a huge job but rose people here do it, then if they spray to try and stop or prevent it, they use a rose spray that just covers Black Spot, Powdery Mildew, Aphids, Caterpillars and two spotted mites. I need some for Aphids so I can let you know what we have here after I've been to town next.
Do you feed your roses? I think roses need to be strong to survive some of the onslaughts and flower well, so I use Seasol, a Seaweed concentrate which stimulates root developement , promotes healthy growth and enhances flowering, plus Dynamic Lifter, an organic plant food containing composted manure, blood and bone, fish meal and seaweed feeds. (I'm quoting from containers.) Dynamic Lifter is in pellet form and stinks in a way that dog find overwhelmingly appetising, hence my having to keep them out of my rose garden, or have low tree gaurds or low fences around garden beds. Seasol is a liquid you dilute, and I make sure it goes direct to the roots using a watering spike and bottle. Sometimes I'll use a specialised rose food, another thing I'll have to get you the name for. I also dig in aged horse manure when planting them.
Golly, that is important, nice roses for a garden wedding, it might be interesting if you tell me what you've tried so far on them. I could run it by a very knowledgeable friend over in Western Australia, she knows far more than I do and has hundreds of roses.(lucky thing.):)

Goldfields
March 28th, 2011, 10:25 PM
Just had another thought, Shirley, did you know that some roses are prone to getting Black Spot? It'd be interesting to know what your roses are, my sister or that friend I mentioned can tell you if there are any baddies amongst them. I rely on my sister at times, she has 2 or 3 hundred roses and will tell me if a rose I have on my wish list is a poor doer, has too many thorns, puts out huge long canes, gets Black Spot easily, or just doesn't thrive etc.. Then I grudgingly delete. LOL

Goldfields
March 30th, 2011, 11:04 AM
This is Twilight Mist again, the rose that was just buds in my last group of photo's.

SamIam
March 30th, 2011, 03:18 PM
That's a lot of snow, it'll be a while yet before you see Spring then. :( Your dogs must love it when they can finally have a run or roll on grass again. It's fairly warm here today(26.3C right now) and I was out watering , weeding, and planting perennials I got in the mail this morning and some pansies. I have bulbs to pot yet but will do it when I have the dogs out for exercise. Right now it's cool down/have a cup of coffee time. My evenings are taken up grooming dogs, the shelties are doing their big change of coat before Winter, or I'd pot the bulbs then.

:laughing: Yep. Right now they are restricted to a deep race track shovelled around the yard. The sun has been out a bit lately and is making the snow firm enough they can walk on, so I have to keep an eye in one place where the drifts are high enough the the chis can walk over the 3ft fence. :rolleyes: In the mean time I am enjoying your fall pictures and those of the lucky Canadians whose spring has at least begun.

Goldfields
March 30th, 2011, 08:09 PM
How many Chi's are using this racetrack? That is so funny, I could just picture them getting the zoomies around it. :laughing: That must be such a problem for dog owners when their fences disappear into the snow, is it the same with livestock on farms? Or are they too heavy to walk on hard snow?
In the garden this morning ....
Best Friend, Bright Eyes, and a variagated geranium.

SamIam
March 31st, 2011, 12:55 AM
:laughing: No, I don't think anything with a hoof could float on it, hope not! We get quite a wind, the drifts can get so bad even 6-foot fences can be useless. 4 of my chis are reliable racers, but sometimes all 7 go around it together at top speed. The old grandma dog likes to cheat and will turn around half-way, come back the way she came and look up at me like she's the coolest kid ever... which she is, of course... Sometimes I put out agility equipment along the path, but that's pretty limited right now as parts of the path are getting too icy for speed.

Goldfields
March 31st, 2011, 02:45 AM
That sounds a whole lot more entertaining than I even thought. ROFL. Especially the grandma who cheats. I've always loved oldies more than pups because of how knowing they are. What a clever old girl. :) It'd be great fun to see them going over the agility equipment, they're a wonderfully agile little dog, aren't they? The breeder I got Jedda off warned me how they'll take a leap out of your arms if you aren't careful and boy, was I glad she did, I very nearly had her go 'splat' one time she tried to jump from shoulder height into a puppy pen. I managed to grab her in mid air. Totally fearless.

hazelrunpack
March 31st, 2011, 11:33 AM
Very pretty, GF. Love the geranium, too! I can actually grow those....sorta. Never had much luck wintering them over, but if I don't forget to water them, I get blooms for a few months. :thumbs up

Chi racers, eh? I think video might be in order! :D

SamIam
March 31st, 2011, 02:29 PM
Afraid not, Hazel, slightly-faster-than-dial-up just doesn't cut it for movies... I should take one, though, before the snow melts, even if it's just for me. :)

Goldfields
March 31st, 2011, 08:35 PM
Thanks, Hazel. Its not very often my camera co-operates and lets me get a photo of anything that shade of bright red. Funnily enough all the geraniums I put in the ground died. I seem to have more luck in pots.

hazelrunpack
April 1st, 2011, 11:01 AM
Afraid not, Hazel, slightly-faster-than-dial-up just doesn't cut it for movies... I should take one, though, before the snow melts, even if it's just for me. :)

You should--and then you can post it after you get an upgrade.. And upgrades do happen, even in some of the least likely locations :D--we used to have dial-up out here in the boonies and just got DSL last year :thumbs up


Funnily enough all the geraniums I put in the ground died. I seem to have more luck in pots.

I have more luck with them in the ground! Don't know if I don't feed potted ones enough or if I feed them too much.... :o

Goldfields
April 1st, 2011, 08:41 PM
Oh, do they like to be fed, Hazel? Duh! LOL. I probably starved mine then, if they didn't die of thirst first during our drought. :( I'll give them some Dynamic Lifter perhaps. I'm a beginner gardener really, haven't got into composting yet, am still scared of the creepy crawly things out there, and have a heck of a lot to learn about everything. :) Oh, when I say that about composting ... I suppose our manure heap is just compost, because after all, everything gets tossed on it, stable straw, grass cuttings etc..

hazelrunpack
April 2nd, 2011, 09:14 AM
:laughing: Maybe they don't like to be fed, considering my luck with potted geraniums!

I always feed the ones in pots--the soil depletes pretty quickly. :D Do you not feed your potted ones? Maybe I am overfeeding, then :shrug:

Goldfields
April 2nd, 2011, 10:35 AM
Oh darn. My sister told me today that she doesn't feed her geraniums but I didn't ask her whether they are in the ground or pots. I think it's in the ground though. I might just leave mine alone until they look like they need something. I buy an expensive potting mix to start with, it's got everything in it, but you are right,stuff gets used or leached out. I'm being cruel to the poor things really. LOL. I planted some bulbs recently and was kind enough to give them some Dynamic Lifter
I was thinking of you today, wondering can you tell me something about Rudbeckia.(yellow coneflower.) It's a native of North America so wondered if you grew it, and if so, do I need to save seeds and resow, or would it just self seed? Does it die down in Winter?

Goldfields
April 2nd, 2011, 10:41 AM
Kronenberg, which I think is a great rose.
Twilight Mist, getting lovelier as it ages IMO.
Seduction, a rose that seems to vary a bit.

hazelrunpack
April 2nd, 2011, 01:55 PM
The yellow coneflowers I used to have were Echinacea , just like the purple coneflowers are. But there are lots of rudbeckia species that grow here, too. Some, which I've never grown, are commonly called 'coneflowers', but some are called black-eyed susans. I have some of the latter growing in the hummingbird garden--but they're perennials. I can't get plants that need to reseed--mine never do. :o Some Black-eyed susans are biennials...for some reason I've had more luck with biennials than annuals. Like the biennial gaura, for instance. That one lasted a long time! I have to remember to look for it this year, though, since it didn't bloom last year. :fingerscr that was just because of the rain and second year plants will have a chance to bloom this summer!

Goldfields
April 2nd, 2011, 07:51 PM
I Googled them just now and it says they are a tough herbaceous perennial. That's good. Looking at the Google images, I could fill my garden with them, I love them. :) I just bought a yellow and an orange Echinacea type coneflower, now just bring on Spring.

mummummum
April 2nd, 2011, 08:21 PM
You know Hazel, the funny thing I have found about Geraniums...the less *love* they get, the better mine do. I'm not knowledgable enough to speak about species but, whenever I got a donation of geraniums for my guerilla garden they were almost always half-dead straggly, one-leafed wonders. I would put the poor things in my mostly toxic, mostly clay and rock and sand and dog-pee soil :D and they would THRIVE.

Seriously, take 'em out to the back forty, beat em up a bit, then plant them. They'll just be so darned grateful to still be alive they'll be eager to please & grow like mad.

hazelrunpack
April 2nd, 2011, 08:25 PM
Can't do it. Too many rabbits and deer in the back 40! :laughing:

mummummum
April 2nd, 2011, 08:34 PM
Can't do it. Too many rabbits and deer in the back 40! :laughing:

Now, Hazel how many times have we told you....the babbits are just as ascared of you as you are of them...

73098

Goldfields
April 2nd, 2011, 10:45 PM
I absolutely love the rabbit. :laughing: The only geranium I have that is thriving here is in the shade and growing above a tail off our septic tank. (Eeewww.) I put them out in full sun, they died, yet I know they should stand full sun. Now I keep them in pots so I remember to water them.
I've been out giving the roses a good drink of Seasol and regardless that I washed my hands, they still smell of seaweed. 40 done, so maybe another 100 to go. Not good for a bad back.:(

mummummum
April 2nd, 2011, 11:23 PM
And I'm just starting my seeds Goldfields!

I actually have quite an adverse reaction to geraniums. So much so that when I plant them I have to use thick rubber gloves up to my elbows and a mask.

And strangely, a friend who is Chinese tells me they are very bad feng shui in your house but good (red =prosperity and white = serenity) in the garden. Apparently, so much depends upon where they are planted in the garden and in which direction they are facing.

Goldfields
April 3rd, 2011, 03:02 AM
Ooh, what seeds? I am totally hooked on growing plants from seeds. LOL. It just feels satisfying seeing lots of colour from what were just seeds in seed raising mix, plus you can get a lot more variety than in the same old, same old seedlings they sell at nurseries. My current lot of seedlings are not doing well outside in my mini hothouses, but then I'm guilty of having let them dry out. Bad, bad me. I'll do some more when I find time.
I suppose geraniums are a bit overpowering scent wise even if you haven't an allergy to them. I don't think I could bring them into the house. But there speaks a true gardener, i.e. yourself, who has an allergy and still grows them.
I have red geraniums but no white ones, I'll have to rectify that.
Must away, daylight saving ended yesterday and we'll have less time outside before dark tonight. Have to get used to it.

mummummum
April 3rd, 2011, 05:16 PM
My guerilla garden in Toronto was pretty much all done by seed, either hand-sewn or in the case of the :crazy: daisies self-sewn. I'll have to see of I can find some pix of it. All flowers and herbs...although last year I had a rogue strawberry plant appear out of thin air. I received some donations from Canadian Tire last fall and was able to plant some fruit trees. We'll see if they will survive. It's a guerilla garden so the "soil" is hideous:D

This year (new house, new garden) I've started a few heirloom varieties of tomatoes and carrots, a few different types basil and mint. Sage and Oregano. Bee balm. Lemon Verbena. Michaelmas daisies. Lots and lots of different types of morning glories (I have a oooogly fence and house to cover up!). A few types of sunflowers. Lavender. Centaura. Having a brain-freeze here ~ some of the seeds I collected in the nabe or brought from TO and put them in last fall. :laughing: The "usual suspects" and apparently a few surprizes let's say!

Believe me I am not a gardener. :rolleyes: That would be an insult to gardeners everywhere. :o I'm a SeederPlanterRareweederOccasionalWaterererTerrific DirtDigger :D

Goldfields
April 3rd, 2011, 08:17 PM
SPROWT :laughing:, I like that. It's about all I am too. I tend to disregard instructions like width between plants for instance, or height, so often put things in the wrong place. Then I'm easily put off weeding by spiders too. I'm right into heirloom tomatoes, though this summer I started them then just gave up on the idea of planting them. Too many hassles with locusts, fairy grass etc.. Next year I'll grow some for sure though. Which ones have you got going? My favorite without a doubt is Cherokee Purple, though it doesn't produce a lot sad to say. Your garden should be lovely and I can have year round sunflowers if you post pics of yours. I have self sown sunflowers coming up in an inconvenient spot, but I love them so much I'm going to leave them there. They look healthier than the ones I start off myself.
I think my biggest addictions are roses and irises, the latter because a very kind friend gives me them, but I buy roses because they are such good value in a garden. DH used to grumble when I came home from shopping with a new one, now he just laughs and asks did I get one.

Goldfields
April 4th, 2011, 08:46 AM
3 more roses. Some are very deserving of extra shots I feel.

Peter Frankenfeld.
Charles Rennie McIntosh.
Grace

mummummum
April 4th, 2011, 09:01 AM
They are jaw-dropping Goldfields. I've never tried roses although I have one in my garden now. It's very leggy (as in 8 feet of leg). I cut it right back as it sits in front of my gas meter (see other thread about meter man and jammies :D) so we'll see what it does this summer. I'll certainly be looking here for advice!

I adore sunflowers. They are the one flower that never fails to make me smile.

The tomato varieties I am trying this year are Aunt Ruby's German Green, Cherokee Purple, Black Cherry and Banana Leggs. The carrot seeds, Rainbow blend, I'll plant directly. I'm going to go with vertical gardening for both, along with some herbs, as I have so little room.

Goldfields
April 4th, 2011, 10:08 AM
I'm hoping no-one asks me if they have a nice perfume. LOL. I rarely smell them, partly because of hay fever that lingers, also the fear of getting an insect up my nose. :D
I have a friend here who has probably 50 roses in big pots, roses she will never put in the ground, and they produce some splendid blooms. If you want to save garden space the odd potted one might be nice. Hope that rose you pruned doesn't just shoot back up to 8 feet again. :eek:
Golly, I wish you were in this country, or I could get seeds through your customs, I could give you some really different tomatoes. Striped, green when ripe, a beautiful pink one called Monomahk's Hat - it can produce a perfect heart shaped tomato. Frische, which is the best red I've tasted, or Tom's Yellow Wonder. Having said that, you have a nice colour combo going on already. I think I'm silly sticking just with flowers. I had a great vegie garden one year and grew some ripper carrots. I love homegrown broccoli too.

mummummum
April 4th, 2011, 12:24 PM
Potted roses?! Hmmmm not a bad thought...I may need to relocate "Leggy" :D as the meter man needs a visual line no greater than 5" off the ground and I would really like to have a rose climbing on the front of my house. The front "yard" is paved and unfenced.

Is it too late/ too early to do this or should I wait for the fall?

Goldfields
April 4th, 2011, 06:37 PM
I do put my roses in during Autumn/Fall, but that's into the ground. I buy potted roses whenever a nice one is available. Roses season here is from late May to the end of August though, when they're available from the big nurseries, I don't know what that would equate to in Canada, especially when you have that super cold winter. I hate to admit it but I have 46 roses still in pots, but when I gave all of them a drink of Seasol I counted how many out in the garden had suffered die back and gone to rose Heaven, and half my potted roses do have a space out there. I'll need to start planting soon.

Goldfields
April 12th, 2011, 04:23 AM
Does anyone have green grass yet, or flowers?

First flower here is Lavendula multifida canariensis, Canary Island Lavender.
A David Austin,rose, Gertrude Jekyll.
Lavender Pinocchio, during its brown phase. LOL.

Goldfields
April 12th, 2011, 04:26 AM
Sending another photo of the Canary Island Lavender, to show how different the foliage is.
Then a photo of the rose Buff Beauty, and finally a little perennial I picked up recently Gentiana triflora 'Royal Blue'.

Goldfields
April 12th, 2011, 04:37 AM
Hmmm. Forgot the photo's but where I could have edited that post before and included the photo's, now I can't. I also can't get the smilies to work. Is anyone else having trouble?

Goldfields
April 13th, 2011, 11:19 AM
I hope Shirley reads this. Now that we are having lower temperatures I have Black Spot right through the roses, some extremely bad, yet other roses are totally clear of it. Not a worry for me because they'll defoliate and either do another Autumn flush, or they will go dormant - depends how cold it gets.

This first rose, Kronenberg, is showing just the start of it. but Fisherman's Friend and the lovely pink Zepherine Drouhin are fine. I won't show you how badly effected my Icebergs are. :(

Goldfields
April 13th, 2011, 11:32 AM
Cosmos.
Combo of petunias and some later flowering Gypsophila.
One of my favorite shocking pinks, Best Friend. Such a stand out in the garden.

hazelrunpack
April 13th, 2011, 02:23 PM
Your roses continue to astound me, GF! Man, they're gorgeous!

Goldfields
April 13th, 2011, 10:21 PM
I have to agree, Hazel. My sister got me started, she'd visit and bring along big bunches of her lovely roses, and the blooms were HUGE. I thought I'd never be able to grow such things. But, every time I visited my vet I would drive past a house that had splendid Standard roses out the front; every time I went shopping I could see a friend's lovely roses from even a paddock away, so finally I thought I'd have to try, they must like this area. I am just so happy I committed myself to the chore, they are a constant delight. They astound me too though. LOL.

Goldfields
April 20th, 2011, 11:20 AM
Though it looks a bit like one, the first rose is not a David Austin, and it's name is Paul Bocuse. A modern shrub rose.

Second is a DA, namely Tamora, and the third is Apricot Nectar, a floribunda.

hazelrunpack
April 20th, 2011, 12:34 PM
Love the color on that last one! And the way it fades toward the edges.

Goldfields
April 20th, 2011, 09:08 PM
Rather intense in the centre, isn't it? :) It will pale out fairly fast seeing it's sunny here.
I'll have a planting day(seeds) after I finish with the big pot of minestrone soup I am cooking. Time for poppies to go in.
First though, here is Crocus rose, looking beautiful whatever stage it's in. A lovely tough rose that repeats and repeats.
Next are some Seduction buds, and finally Kronenberg, I love the yellow reverse on the petals of this one. It's a big rose, average 6" diameter, 41+ petals. I just realised I should add a link for anyone who is interested in roses but doesn't have it, because it will let you know what zones the roses do well in.

http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/plants.php

hazelrunpack
April 20th, 2011, 09:25 PM
So you plant in fall, GF? I've had fairly good luck direct sowing native wildflower seed in autumn, but our winters are cold enough to keep the seed dormant till spring.

The Seduction buds are beautiful!!! :cloud9:

Goldfields
April 20th, 2011, 09:58 PM
Only certain things can be planted now, Hazel. Poppies, Aquilegia, Nigella, Wallflowers, Candytufts, Canterbury Bells,, Gypsophila, Alyssum, Virginian Stocks, Pansies/Viola, Evening Scented Stocks(Mathiola), Cerinthe Purple .....I'm only mentioning the ones I have planted, or have germinated already. One of my most unusual is Stapelia variegata, or Carrion flower/ starfish flower. No pleasant odour there, it attracts flies. (Eeewww!) A novelty therefore, maybe I'll only grow it once just to have a look at it. Oh, I use mini hothouses for the seedlings, have to keep them frost free. I never direct sow, it's a failure here, I'm sure the ants take the seeds.

Shaykeija
April 20th, 2011, 10:24 PM
Oh dang.. the snow covered all my flowers and the tulips just bloomed..Ugh

Goldfields
April 20th, 2011, 11:05 PM
That's no good, Shaykeija. Have you had that happen other years? Just wondering will it harm them?

Shaykeija
April 20th, 2011, 11:09 PM
Nope just like me, tough as nails

Goldfields
April 21st, 2011, 02:32 AM
This (Bourbon 1868) rose, Zepherin Drouhin, is a good one to have. Nice colour, thornless, and it has a magnificent perfume. :cloud9:
Next is a sweet little Bonica bud, followed by a very fragrant HT, The Children's Rose. :lovestruck:

hazelrunpack
April 21st, 2011, 08:32 AM
How long into winter will your roses be blooming, GF?

Shaykeija
April 21st, 2011, 09:51 AM
All the snow covered flowers look OK.

Goldfields
April 21st, 2011, 10:07 AM
That's good, Shay. You'll have to post some photo's once the snow thaws. :)

Hazel, I'm not sure there will be a single rose in Winter . I just looked at June/July/August for the past two years and there were only one or two rose photo's. In July I start to get some bulbs flowering, and the Wattles, more bulbs in August but that's when my lambs start arriving so I have more fun photographing them than flowers. Just maybe I could get a late Autumn flush of roses in May, I'm hoping anyway.

Goldfields
April 24th, 2011, 01:21 AM
The Pilgrim just keeps on going.
Yellow Charles Austin, and finally the deliciously crumpled petals of Temora.

Goldfields
May 14th, 2011, 11:17 AM
Getting close to Winter now and there is not much in the garden now. A geranium that appeals to me despite how plain it is. An Apricot Nectar bud, and the same rose just more advanced.

SamIam
May 14th, 2011, 11:41 AM
Oh wow, your roses are still doing wonderfully!
Is your climate warm enough that geraniums are a perennial there, or do you replant every year?

hazelrunpack
May 14th, 2011, 01:43 PM
Very pretty, GF!!

I love apricot-colored roses.

Goldfields
May 14th, 2011, 08:53 PM
The Geraniums are a perennial here, Sam. Maybe some are biennial, but certainly not annuals. We take them for granted and I'd have thought they could stand the dry BUT just reading about them they actually like damp soil. No wonder I lost mine during our long drought. Must take better care of those I have now.
I have two apricot roses planted where I can see them out of my office window, Hazel, that one and Just Joey, a silly name for what must be one of the best roses I've seen. LOL. Oh, I finally got hubby to agree to me making another garden bed facing (running towards) the office, for some of my shade lovers. I will put my Veltheimias there if V. Bracteata grows on okay. I germinated it from seed, but bought V. Capensis as a bulb.

http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/index.php/Veltheimia

Yesterday we replaced the dog's gazebo - I like a dry area to let the dogs into if it's raining, saves putting on coats just to toilet them - so while we set up the new one I had to shift these Bromeliads out. The three flowers are alike yet different, The two pink and mauve ones are different in size, plus one has variegated leaves, the other does not, while the third starts off a limey green and brown, with the colour changing to two tone mauve. My third photo is of Cerinthe Major, and I like its bluey/green foliage, stands out amongst other plants.