Pets.ca - Pet forum for dogs cats and humans 

-->

Hot Spots

BenMax
February 25th, 2011, 11:15 AM
Well again we have yet another hot spot episode.
Background: Taken from a shelter with severe skin condition almost one year ago. I was told that it was hot spots that got infected. Spike was prescribed Baytril and DermaBensS shampoo. He is also on heart meds (Fortekor and Vetmedin daily).

We have had now 4 episodes of hot spots. One comes up and spreads like wildfire. I have shaved this poor dog in all various spots including around the eye and under the chin. He looks terrible.

Vet prescribed once again the Baytril.

Does anyone know of any alternatives to relieve the hot spots. Continously giving him Baytril cannot be the answer. His system is compromised and I am worried to cause further damage to him.

Spike is a 7 year old male shih zsu.

Any suggestions?

rainbow
February 25th, 2011, 01:28 PM
Poor Spike. :( :grouphug:

Are you sure it's not allergies? What are you feeding him? Did the vet do skin scrapings and check for a thyroid condition?

I've got some info on recurring hot spots .....I'll go find it and post the websites here.

rainbow
February 25th, 2011, 01:38 PM
Here's the websites ....

http://www.labbies.com/Secondary_Skin_Allergies.htm

http://www.b-naturals.com/newsletter/skin-care-remedies-and-tips-2/


And, if he has developed a yeast infection try putting him on a low glycemic diet ....

http://www.b-naturals.com/newsletter/low-glycemic/

BenMax
February 25th, 2011, 01:42 PM
Here's the websites ....

http://www.labbies.com/Secondary_Skin_Allergies.htm

http://www.b-naturals.com/newsletter/skin-care-remedies-and-tips-2/


And, if he has developed a yeast infection try putting him on a low glycemic diet ....

http://www.b-naturals.com/newsletter/low-glycemic/

Yes - yeast infections have happened a few times..can there be a link?
He is currently eating Acana Pacifica, yogurt and green tripe.

rainbow
February 25th, 2011, 01:53 PM
Yes, there can ......from http://www.b-naturals.com/newsletter/?s=yeast+infection

Yeast

Yeast infections can often come with allergies, due to constant scratching and itching. Certain medications used to treat skin problems can encourage yeast growth. Yeast thrives when steroids are given. Antibiotic use tends to kill the beneficial bacteria, which in turn can cause yeast to grow without these present which naturally help fight them off. Some of these symptoms imitate allergies, and often these two problems can ‘ping pong’ back and forth. A skin culture can often determine which problem is present. For more reading on yeast problems, go here: http://b-naturals.com/Apr2002.php

Yeast grows and thrives on sugar, so eliminating high glycemic foods from the diet can help. Probiotic Powder is also helpful in fighting a yeast overgrowth, as well as frequent bathings with an oatmeal based shampoo, and rinsing with a solution of half white vinegar and water. Olive leaf Extract and Yeast and Fungal Tincture are also helpful to combat yeast. But a visit to your Veterinarian is the best way to determine if your dog has a yeast problem.

Here are four recipes that
are helpful for all these conditions.

Cooked diets
also need to offer variety, and large batches can be packaged into meal sized
portions and frozen for later use. Feeding amounts are the same, approximately 2% to 3% of the dog’s body weight daily. For instance, a 100 pound dog would eat two to three pounds of food a day, a fifty pound dog would eat one to one and a half pounds of food daily, and a 25 pound dog would eat 1/2 pound to 3/4 pound daily. A cup is approximately 8 ounces or 1/2 pound, some dogs will do well on two meals a day, others may need three or four smaller meals a day.

Do not overcook the meat, but rather cook lightly which will retain more of the nutrients. Butter can be used for cooking (unsalted butter for those dogs with kidney or heart problems), for flavor and palatability.

Sample Diet One

(one meal for a 100 lb dog, or two meals for a 50 lb dog, or four meals for a
25 pound dog)

- One lb regular
hamburger, 4 oz beef liver or kidney, cook with small amount of butter
- 1 or 2 eggs, scrambled or soft boiled
- 1/2 cup steamed or boiled broccoli
- 1/2 cup cooked yellow crookneck squash
- 4 oz whole milk yogurt

Cook meat, eggs and vegetables and mix. When cooled, add yogurt.

To this, add:
- 1600 mg of calcium , or one teaspoon of dried, ground eggshell
- One teaspoon Berte’s Green Blend (for trace minerals)
- One teaspoon of Berte’s Immune Blend per 35 lbs of body weight
daily
- Add 1,000 mg of EPA fish or salmon oil per ten pounds of body weight daily

Sample Diet Two

- One lb ground chicken, four oz of chicken liver, cook with small amount of
butter
- 1 or 2 eggs, scrambled or soft boiled
- 1/2 cup steamed or boiled Spinach
- 1/2 cup cooked cabbage
- 4 oz Cottage Cheese

Cook meat, eggs and vegetables and mix. When cooled, add cottage cheese.

To this, add:
- 1600 mg of calcium, or one teaspoon of dried, ground eggshell
- One teaspoon Berte’s Green Blend (for trace minerals)
- One teaspoon of Berte’s Immune Blend per 35 lbs of body weight
daily
- Add 1,000 mg of EPA fish or salmon oil per ten pounds of body weight daily

Sample Diet Three

- One lb ground pork, 4 oz of pork or beef liver, cook with small amount of
butter
- 1 or 2 eggs, scrambled or soft boiled
- 1/2 cup steamed or boiled Bok Choy or Chinese cabbage
- 1/2 cup zucchini
- 4 oz Whole Milk Yogurt

Cook meat, eggs and vegetables and mix. When cooled, add yogurt.

To this, add:
- 1600 mg of calcium, or one teaspoon of dried, ground eggshell
- One teaspoon Berte’s Green Blend (for trace minerals)
- One teaspoon of Berte’s Immune Blend per 35 lbs of body weight
daily
- Add 1,000 mg of EPA fish or salmon oil per ten pounds of body weight daily

Sample Diet Four

- One can 16 oz Mackerel or Salmon
- 1 or 2 eggs, scrambled or soft boiled
- 1/2 cup broccoli
- 1/2 cup Kale or other dark leafy green
- 4 oz Cottage Cheese

Cook vegetables and eggs (no need to cook the canned fish, it is already cooked) and mix together. No calcium is needed as mackerel, salmon or sardines already contain soft, steamed bones for calcium content.

To this, add:
- One teaspoon Berte’s Green Blend (for trace minerals)
- One teaspoon of Berte’s Immune Blend per 35 lbs of body weight
daily
- Add 1,000 mg of EPA fish or salmon oil per ten pounds of body weight daily



Read more on Low-Glycemic…

BenMax
February 25th, 2011, 02:02 PM
Wow! I have alot to read!!! Thanks.:thumbs up

rainbow
February 25th, 2011, 02:13 PM
Wow! I have alot to read!!! Thanks.:thumbs up

I hope it helps :grouphug: .....they are sooo hard to get rid of as you have to find out what exactly is causing them. :fingerscr :goodvibes:

BenMax
February 25th, 2011, 02:19 PM
I hope it helps :grouphug: .....they are sooo hard to get rid of as you have to find out what exactly is causing them. :fingerscr :goodvibes:

The vets have not been able to find the source. I have elimated the possibility of the heart meds as he was not on them when I got him.

aslan
February 25th, 2011, 02:20 PM
hot spots in the winter is kinda odd...are the spots really red and inflamed BM or just sores,,if they're just sores mix a 1 to 4 mixture of applecider vinegar (real not distilled) to water..the vinegar will help dry the sore and will kill bacteria.

BenMax
February 25th, 2011, 02:27 PM
hot spots in the winter is kinda odd...are the spots really red and inflamed BM or just sores,,if they're just sores mix a 1 to 4 mixture of applecider vinegar (real not distilled) to water..the vinegar will help dry the sore and will kill bacteria.

They are circular, red and crusty. Some will actually have yellow pus. He is very itchy and will run his face through the snow for relief.

rainbow
February 25th, 2011, 02:29 PM
The vets have not been able to find the source. I have elimated the possibility of the heart meds as he was not on them when I got him.

There's lots of information on those websites but since I've never had to deal with this problem I admit I have not read it all. :o I just thought that maybe there's something there that might relate to Spike. :shrug:

rainbow
February 25th, 2011, 02:31 PM
It was the apple cider vinegar that got rid of Chase's lick sore but it wasn't oozing. If the sores are raw or oozing then it will sting.

BenMax
February 25th, 2011, 02:31 PM
Trust me..I will be reading it. I need to know how to help this dog. They say he does not have long to live..I beg to differ and plan on ensuring that he has a painfree life. Discomfort included...

rainbow
February 25th, 2011, 02:35 PM
Trust me..I will be reading it. I need to know how to help this dog. They say he does not have long to live..I beg to differ and plan on ensuring that he has a painfree life. Discomfort included...

I know you will .....you go above and beyond for not only your own but for all the animals you come in contact with. :angel: :grouphug:

kathryn
February 25th, 2011, 03:21 PM
I would recommend this
http://www.drrosesremedies.com/products.shtml

We sell it where I work. It is pricey, but we've had a 100% success rate for it for wounds, cuts, hot spots and any other topical problems.

I'll check tomorrow when I am at work and see if there are anymore topical solutions I would recommend.

BenMax
February 25th, 2011, 04:07 PM
Thank you Kathryn.:)

dbg10
February 25th, 2011, 04:33 PM
Sorry to hear you're dealing again with Hot Spots they are soooo frustrating :frustrated: One of my previous dogs had recurrent hot spots and what I finally found something that was effective.

The vet put her on an oral antibiotic as well as an antibiotic cream with steroids in it which I can't remember the name of now. I initially started using what the vet gave me but found that she went after the hot spots and was really bothered by them. Then I started experimenting and ended up with the following:

As soon as I noticed one starting I would use compresses of "Witch Hazel" to soothe the pain and discomfort that she was obviously feeling. I followed that by cleaning it up with a dilute 50/50 solution of "Hydrogen Peroxide" to water, then applied the antibiotic/steroid cream. Finally I used "Gold Bond Medicated Foot Powder" (no zinc in that preparation) to dry up the pus and gunk. Every few hours I would repeat this until the hot spot showed signs of starting to heal. The Witch Hazel was fantastic to settle her down so she didn't scratch and lick them once I'd applied it. It stopped the itching.

Another astringent solution that I used was "Burows Solution" aka "Domeboro powder". It did an excellent job of cleaning up the hot spots but I increasingly wasn't able to find it at the pharmacy. It is made by Bayer.

I'm sure you've tried all sorts of things to control and treat Spike's hot spots. One thing I added to the regimen after consulting my vet was an antihistamine because I thought her hot spots were allergy related. I played with her diet but never did find an answer there no matter how many different foods I gave her. If nothing else it seemed to reduce the itching from the hot spots.

Good luck with Spike, I know how frustrating it can be :thumbs up :grouphug:

BenMax
February 25th, 2011, 05:55 PM
Thank you dgb10 - looks like I have alot to look into. It is so frustrating not only for me of course. I just feel so bad when my animals feel bad.
Thank you for your support and understanding.

Shaykeija
February 25th, 2011, 08:46 PM
Did you try Gold Bond medicated powder? That seems to help dryout and heal the hot spots. Poor little bug.....

MaxaLisa
February 26th, 2011, 01:33 AM
For Hot Spots I use aloe vera gel on the hot spot. I also get my boy to the chiropractor as soon as possible, and use scullcap to relax the nerve area. If I can do all these things right away, it doesn't get bad at all.

BenMax
February 26th, 2011, 05:24 AM
Did you try Gold Bond medicated powder? That seems to help dryout and heal the hot spots. Poor little bug.....

I do have it and it helps relieve but I cannot use it around the eyes nor the mouth.

Shaykeija
February 26th, 2011, 08:24 AM
is she shaved down? I would try to apply the powder with a qtip. just a little.

BenMax
February 26th, 2011, 08:31 AM
is she shaved down? I would try to apply the powder with a qtip. just a little.

You should see what I did to this poor dog:eek:. I shaved him down in all hotspot areas (what a mess...poor guy looks all deshevelled). I also used a q-tip with the powder on the upper part of the eye, but it is in the corners around the eye lid..and that is what I cannot get to.

He is getting another treatment bath today. He absolutely HATES it.

Goldfields
February 26th, 2011, 09:18 AM
A friend who has bred shelties for over 30 years swears bathing will produce hot spots unless you make sure the dog is totally dry afterwards. I've only had one to cope with in about that same length of time but maybe this rotten humid weather we are having has a lot to do with it? Poor little fellow sounds as if he really needs you, BenMax. Good luck.

kathryn
February 26th, 2011, 01:52 PM
here is something else i thought of

http://www.auntjeni.com/FAQ_for_First_Aid_for_Pets.pdf