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Help, how do you slow down a fast eater

Sylvie
February 1st, 2011, 10:31 PM
As you know we have just got 2 new pupsters.

The male Kobe, eats way too fast.

Anyone have any suggestions how to slow his eating down. He gobbles so fast that sometime he ends up choking.

tenderfoot
February 1st, 2011, 10:56 PM
There are lots of different choices.
You can put peanut butter on the bottom of a large bowl so the kibble sticks to it and he has to work harder to get it.
You can put large river rocks in his bowl so he has to move them around to get at the food.
You can moisten his food so that it is tougher to inhale it so quickly.
You can get a 'brake fast' bowl which is specially designed to slow your dog down (it has finger sized posts in it so the dog has to work harder to get the food).
You can toss the kibble across the floor or out in the yard so he has to hunt each piece down.
You can put his meal into a busy ball so little bits drop out at a time while he plays with the ball.
Just some ideas.

rainbow
February 1st, 2011, 11:11 PM
Tendederfoot gave you lots of good options but everyone knows that I'm not a fan of peanut butter so would not use that on a daily basis.

What works for me and our labrahoover is putting a small kong in the middle of the bowl so he has to eat around it. You can also use anything else like a rock, small bowl, etc.

Another option would be to feed him on a cookie pan.

Melinda
February 2nd, 2011, 08:46 AM
I had a rescue like that and ended up feeding her two seperate meals in her large kongs.

BenMax
February 2nd, 2011, 09:15 AM
We have the brake fast bowl for our rescue dobie. I call it a Piggy Bowl. It does slow her down somewhat. I have yet however to find one in metal. The ones we have are durable plastic.

It does work.:thumbs up

Masha
February 2nd, 2011, 09:24 AM
Great ideas. I am not sure about moistening the kibble, I read and was told not to moist our guy's kibble because it can increase risk of bloat.

tenderfoot
February 2nd, 2011, 10:32 AM
I am not vet and do not play one on TV, but the logic of moistened food causing bloat does not make sense to me. In fact I think the opposite could be true.
Most kibble expands dramatically when water is added to it. So one cup of dry kibble becomes 2-3 cups of heavy wet kibble in the stomach after they take a drink (which always follows eating dry kibble). If you are feeding more than one cup at a time do the math.
This does not happen in nature - the food stays the same in the stomach because the meat is already fully hydrated.
The canine is also exhausted from the hunt/chase and rests after eating - he does not run around moving his stomach around enabling it to flip (torsion).
Dogs drink a lot more water than they would if you fed them wet food. Imagine eating a bowl of Cheerios with milk. Then imagine eating a bowl of Cheerios dry. After eating the dry cereal you would probably go to the fridge and gulp down a lot more milk than normal because you are parched. So dogs drink a lot more water when they eat dry food than when they eat wet food.
Yes, we have changed the rib cages, body size and feeding habits of our domestic dogs, but going back to a more natural way of feeding can only be good for them.

Masha
February 2nd, 2011, 12:56 PM
of course gulping water after eating lots of kibble would have the same effect i image.... here is some info i found.... i guess it would depend on the type of kibble then.

Bloat Risk
Research at Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine by Lawrence T. Glickman, V.M.D., et. al., found a risk with adding water to dry dog foods that contain citric acid. According to Holly Nash, D.V.M., Pet Education Veterinary Services Department, although there is a correlation between bloat and adding liquid to dry dog foods containing citric acid, the cause is unknown.

Bottom Line
According to Wendy C. Brooks, D.V.M., Veterinary Partner Educational Director, moistening dry food can be a problem, especially if citric acid is an ingredient in the dog food. Additionally, wetting dog food may also increase bacteria growth. Adding canned dog food or table scraps to dry food, instead of water or other moisture such as milk, can encourage a dog to eat without increasing the risk of bloat in any breed. According to Glickman, adding canned food and table scraps actually decreases the risk of bloat.



Read more: Is it ok to mix dry dog food with water? | Answerbag http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/1989115#ixzz1CpEeeAzz

tenderfoot
February 2nd, 2011, 08:43 PM
Thanks for the info.
It's almost as bad as the studies that say eggs are bad for you and then 6 months later they say they are good for you.
There was a recent article that said all of the original ideas vets were touting as bloat prevention tactics were shown to make no difference or even made things worse.
I have to go with what makes sense to me. I always think "what would nature do?".

Masha
February 3rd, 2011, 08:09 AM
i think in nature dogs wouldn't be eating kibble... hence why i support raw feeding. but i think everyone should do what they are comfortable with at the end of the day and what makes sense to them personally.

Rgeurts
February 3rd, 2011, 11:03 AM
Sylvie, we had the same problem with Nookie. We got a "Go sow" bowl which helped, but was plastic and we weren't comfortable with that. Nookie was SO prone to bloat. I did a lot of searching and finally found a Mastiff forum that said to slow down a fast eater and reduce the risk of bloat, teach your dog to lie down while eating. So... that's what we did!! It works wonderfully. He will see me with his food bowl and just fall to the ground lol. It definitely slowed him down a lot. And it also helped with the bloat as he doesn't suck in all the air when he eats now. We have been doing this for about 5-6 months now. :thumbs up

tenderfoot
February 3rd, 2011, 12:04 PM
Masha- we definitely believe that raw diet is the answer to most nutritional issues as well as many medical and behavioral ones.

Rgeurts - great idea. Think if a wolf eating his kill, most of the time he is laying down to tear at the food and swallow it. Raised bowls which were recommended at one time to prevent bloat never made any sense to me.

Rgeurts
February 3rd, 2011, 12:34 PM
Masha- we definitely believe that raw diet is the answer to most nutritional issues as well as many medical and behavioral ones.

Rgeurts - great idea. Think if a wolf eating his kill, most of the time he is laying down to tear at the food and swallow it. Raised bowls which were recommended at one time to prevent bloat never made any sense to me.

Ya, raised was suggested to us by several people, but the more I read, the more I found that raising the bowl is actually bad :shrug:

One article said that it was thought that raising the bowl helped to keep a good amount of air out of the stomach but was published back in the late 90's and it has since been found to actually contribute to bloat. Our regular vet and specialist have both admitted that bloat is a mystery and there is really no evidence to either prove or disprove any of the mainstream methods that are typically suggested. The only thing I can say is that by teaching Nookie to lay down, he eats a lot slower! So whether it's the actual act of lying down, less air intake, or even a combination of both, I have no clue. I just know it works for him :)

hazelrunpack
February 3rd, 2011, 07:55 PM
That's interesting, Rgeurts. Our Evan, the one with IBD, was prone to bloat and he was the only dog we ever had that naturally lay down to eat.

Rgeurts
February 3rd, 2011, 08:38 PM
That's interesting, Rgeurts. Our Evan, the one with IBD, was prone to bloat and he was the only dog we ever had that naturally lay down to eat.

That's odd. There must be something to it. As ravenous as Nookie was (he would literally jump up and knock the bowl out of our hands), I thought there was no way we would ever be able to get him to lay down! Now, he knows if he doesn't, he doesn't eat lol. So he plops down. He hasn't been bloated in months! No more pot bellied piggy dog!

Sylvie
February 4th, 2011, 06:40 PM
Thank you everyone for your suggestions.

I had tried the ball when we first got him and he just picked it up and threw it on the floor. :laughing:

Interesting about the bloat. When we lost Greta to bloat last year, she hadn't ate or drank anything and was not running around. It was a mystery, one that I never want to experience again :(

Masha
February 4th, 2011, 06:46 PM
I had tried the ball when we first got him and he just picked it up and threw it on the floor. :laughing:

oh oh -- you have got a smart one on your hands... :evil:

rainbow
February 4th, 2011, 07:26 PM
I had tried the ball when we first got him and he just picked it up and threw it on the floor. :laughing:


Chase did that with his ball (his favourite toy) but for some reason he left the kong alone. :shrug:

Try putting a heavy bowl (upside down) in his dish and see if that works. :fingerscr

Sylvie
February 6th, 2011, 12:56 PM
I got Kobe a brake fast bowl. Will update on how it works. He will get his first meal tonight.

I sure hope it works. He eats way too fast and will choke to death one day:eek:

rainbow
February 6th, 2011, 03:27 PM
Good luck, Sylvie ....I hope it works. :fingerscr :goodvibes:

Koma
February 19th, 2011, 12:48 PM
My pup had a huge issue with eating fast, the best I could do is slow down his food aggression so I did the following.

1. I ensured he was fully relaxed before going to the bowl. I noticed when I had brought it that he worked up the food himself, and then wolfed it down when he got too close to it. In order to fix that I placed myself infront of his bowl, constantly intercepting him to show I was the dominant one, and thus not allow him to eat until I told him he was allowed to eat. At that point I used the Sit/Stay method (which if you train the sit stay for 5 minutes a day, takes no time to master at 5 months) in which he was then able to sit/stay infront of it, and if he tensed, I moved myself infront of his bowl until he was relaxed, then said go and he eats.

2. I then realized though he ate slower, he still had a fear of me taking the food away from him. Almost as if someone had done that previous to him, or other dogs, his older siblings, would steal his food when his feeding time started (Before I took him under my wing). At that point I sat with him while he ate, and pet him very slowly, very methodically to just show him I wasn't a threat to his food.

After his behavioural issues are dealt with, then you I'd say imply some of the things that will slow the overall speed in which the dog can get to the food, but if your pup is like mine, the issue is more in the fact he shovels it into his mouth, doesn't chew, and swallows 10 pieces at a time, as that is what is worrysome.

It should take about 1/2 - a week for the 1st part, and an additional 1/2 - 1 weekl for the second if done twice a day at feeding, and doing sit/stays once a day for 5 minutes.

If you have any questions or want to know any detailed info about any of the techniques, feel free to send me a msg.