Pets.ca - Pet forum for dogs cats and humans 

-->

Allergies

regdcan48
December 5th, 2010, 11:29 AM
I have a 7 1/2 year old Akita. have owned her for 2 years. Her paws get red and sometimes inflamed. Our vet has given her medication for fungal infections, and changed her food to , Purina DRM veterinary diet. She is a vegatarian dog and I think her redness between her toes and on the pads of her feet are an allergic reaction. Should we try switching her back to a regular vegatarian dog food?

sugarcatmom
December 5th, 2010, 11:36 AM
She is a vegatarian dog and I think her redness between her toes and on the pads of her feet are an allergic reaction. Should we try switching her back to a regular vegatarian dog food?

Why is she vegetarian?

regdcan48
December 5th, 2010, 03:25 PM
She gets reactions from any kind of meat products, something to do with the proteins in the meat I think.

Crazy4kitties
December 5th, 2010, 06:22 PM
Which meats have you tried? Kangaroo, venison, duck, etc? I've never heard of a dog being allergic to all meats

MaxaLisa
December 5th, 2010, 06:44 PM
She gets reactions from any kind of meat products, something to do with the proteins in the meat I think.

I am willing to bet that there are some meat allergies, but also allergies from other things, including starches and vegetables. For example, my dog is allergie to potatoes and carrots, my other dog was allergic to corn, wheat, and all sorts of other things.

Some folks believe that since allergies are to proteins, that it's the proteins only that can be a problem. This is definitely not the case.

I do agree that you should change the food, but not to a vegetarian food. Find a single protein, single carb source food, and a protein that she has never had. It's also possible that some of the reaction is because she is not getting the nutrition that she needs to support and balance her body. Dogs should have meat protein.

cassiek
December 6th, 2010, 12:50 AM
I have a 7 1/2 year old Akita. have owned her for 2 years. Her paws get red and sometimes inflamed. Our vet has given her medication for fungal infections, and changed her food to , Purina DRM veterinary diet. She is a vegatarian dog and I think her redness between her toes and on the pads of her feet are an allergic reaction. Should we try switching her back to a regular vegatarian dog food?

This screams allergies to me. I wouldn't jump straight to a vegetarian diet. Dogs can have environmental allergies, food allergies, or both and unless you do an allergy test (which is not 100% representative all the time - but, is a great place to start) it can be difficult to guess what she is allergic to.

Generally speaking in loose terms, dogs are allergic to the most commonly used meat proteins, beef and chicken. You can start off by trying a novel protein such as lamb, fish, rabbit etc. Acana makes a great single source protein called "Lamb & Apple" which is free of most of the common allergens. Orijen also has an exclusive fish diet that may also work well. I wouldn't avoid meat altogether - she likely is not allergic to all types of meat.

Many vets prescribe a vegetarian diet as a generic quick fix, and IMO, there are far better alternatives. She could be allergic to wheat, corn, etc. or some of the other grains in the vegetarian formula.

She could also have several environmental allergies (like to trees, weeds, etc) that are not food-related at all and need to be addressed in other ways.


Allergies are difficult at the best of times to manage, but it can be done. :thumbs up I have a dog with severe allergies (both food and enviro - including cow, bison, chicken, rice, wheat, various weed species, hay etc) and it has been quite the challenge to even keep it somewhat manageable. I switch between Acana Lamb & Apple and Orijen's Pacifica as well as supplemeting with fish oils. I very, very rarely give the steriods my vet prescribes - only when they are absolutely needed. There is a drug called Atopica that has been helpful for some dogs with allergies and has none of the side effects of steriods. You can also give your dog injections to "de-sensitize" him to what he is allerigic to if you have a allergy panel done they can make up an injection custom to his allergens. There are several products on the market from shampoos and oils to improve coat condition that may be of help. And there is various diets out there with novel, rare proteins the dog is not likely allergic to you can also try.

Best of luck with your gal! If you have any q's feel free to PM me :D

regdcan48
December 7th, 2010, 06:36 AM
She was 5 years old when we got her and was on a vegetarian diet when we got her. Previous owners said she was put on a vegetarian diet at their vet's recommendation.

hazelrunpack
December 9th, 2010, 09:20 AM
Do you mean a vegetarian diet as in some sort of hydrolyzed vegetable protein diet, regdcan? Does the vet suspect IBD?

cassiek
December 9th, 2010, 11:16 AM
She was 5 years old when we got her and was on a vegetarian diet when we got her. Previous owners said she was put on a vegetarian diet at their vet's recommendation.

Yeah, when we discovered our dog had allergies the vet recommended Medi-Cal Vegetarian Diet. Unfortunately, most vets do not receive alot of training in nutrition and what they do receive is taught by representatives from Medi-Cal, Science Diet, etc. so they tend to recommend these "veterinary exclusive diets" to most dog owners.

Most dogs with allergies are not allergic to all types of meat. She could also have environmental allergies that is causing the reaction you describe, but has never been tested for them. I fed my dog a vegetarian diet for years and it didn't help. I found out he can eat some meat proteins and many of his allergies are environmental which can not be controlled with diet alone.

Best of luck!

jassy3399
December 23rd, 2010, 12:04 AM
I would definitely start with an allergy panel. As someone said, it's not all inclusive, but it's a great place to start, and it's not, generally speaking, too terribly expensive. That being said, my dog has allergies as well, and the allergy panel didn't discover what he was allergic to. I did that quite by accident when I moved out into a new apartment that had a new carpet. I won't smoke in the apartment, but at my old house, everyone smoked. Within a couple weeks, he'd stopped scratching and biting at his paws and legs, and now only gets allergy attacks in the fall rather than having problems year round. So it's difficult to say, without a panel and without carefully eliminating things, just what your pooch may be allergic to. I suggest trying the food suggestions already mentioned and talking to your vet about the allergy panel. Also, my boy is prone to skin infections as well if I'm not right on top of his seasonal allergies. Their chewing and scratching irritates the skin and can result in infection - which will in turn cause more scratching as the infection is irritating! Have the vet examine the redness as it may be sign of skin infection (not necessarily fungal) and she might need antibiotics. Good luck, I know how frustrating trying to track down and deal with allergies can be.