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rescue dogs

raingirl
September 13th, 2004, 09:53 AM
I've been looking at a few online places at rescue dogs (www.petfinder.com and www.petharbor.com). I'm finding that 99% of the dogs are in the following catagories:

-GSD
-Collies
-Beagles
-pitbulls
-terriers
-dalmations
-retrievers
-chow chows
-spaniels
-rottweilers
-shiba inu
-akita
-husky
-cattle dogs

Unfortunately, none of these dogs are good for apartments. I really would like to consider a rescue dog, but all of these are too large, and not appropriate for our living conditions.

Any suggestions?

Writing4Fun
September 13th, 2004, 10:04 AM
Go to breed club websites. They usually have links to breed-specific rescues. Or you can pick a rescue from Petfinder and give them a call. They might have dogs that are not ready to be adopted yet, or they can put you on a list and call you when a dog comes in. Good luck! :D

raingirl
September 13th, 2004, 10:08 AM
That's an idea. I didn't think of that. We are currently working on our application for the boxer rescue of ontario. I'm a little aprehensive about that, because they look kinda mean when I see them on the street. In the pics they look ok though. aparently they are ok for apartment dogs. I like great danes, but can't seen to convince my other half about them. hehehe.

MBRA518
September 13th, 2004, 10:15 AM
That's an idea. I didn't think of that. We are currently working on our application for the boxer rescue of ontario. I'm a little aprehensive about that, because they look kinda mean when I see them on the street. In the pics they look ok though. aparently they are ok for apartment dogs. I like great danes, but can't seen to convince my other half about them. hehehe.

Boxers are lovely dogs... but I suggest you do more research on the temperment and activity level of these dogs and meet a few. I think a boxer can make a good apartment dog with the right amount of exercise, but IMO you really need to met a few of these dogs in person before you decide... Your comment "I'm a little aprehensive about that, because they look kinda mean when I see them on the street. In the pics they look ok though." tells me you are not ready to decide on this breed. The rescue organization should be able to help you in finding more information and meeting a few dogs and experianced boxer owners to help you in your choice.

Good luck

wingsonawolf
September 13th, 2004, 10:18 AM
message deleted

MBRA518
September 13th, 2004, 10:21 AM
I've been looking at a few online places at rescue dogs (www.petfinder.com and www.petharbor.com). I'm finding that 99% of the dogs are in the following catagories:

-GSD
-Collies
-Beagles
-pitbulls
-terriers
-dalmations
-retrievers
-chow chows
-spaniels
-rottweilers
-shiba inu
-akita
-husky
-cattle dogs

Unfortunately, none of these dogs are good for apartments. I really would like to consider a rescue dog, but all of these are too large, and not appropriate for our living conditions.

Any suggestions?

There is no reason that some of those breeds or x breeds wouldn't fit your situation... it all depends on the dog. I wouldn't rule out any dogs by breed alone.

I would suggest that you look for an older dog - one out of puppy hood if you are worried about things like size, activity and such as an older dog is less likely to change his temperment and will be full grown.

I would take W4F's advise and call a few rescues and tell them your situation and what you want in a dog and let them decide what may interest you. Those people know the dogs and will have a better sence of what would be suitable... Then you can meet those dogs and go from there. By going this route you will not only better weed out the dogs that will not be suitable from what they have in rescue now, but they will also be able to contact you with new dogs coming in, even before they make it to the petfinder site.

Good luck

Lucky Rescue
September 13th, 2004, 10:23 AM
The truth of the matter is that big dogs are often better in apartments than small dogs! Most of the dogs you listed - like the herding breeds -are not.

For example, a greyhound is much quieter and better suited for this lifestyle than, say, a Jack Russel Terrier. Also, small, cute and perfect little dogs are hard to find, as they are much sought after, although Daisy sounds pretty darn perfect!:)

Here are some small dogs in the TO area:
"Daisy" - Bichon (http://www.petfinder.org/pet.cgi?action=2&pet=3343104&adTarget=468doggeneral&SessionID=4145b7bc26b1cea9-app4&display=&preview=1&row=0&tmpl=&stat=)
"Minnow" - Amer. Eskie (http://www.petfinder.org/pet.cgi?action=2&pet=3361826&adTarget=468doggeneral&SessionID=4145b7bc26b1cea9-app4&display=&preview=1&row=0&tmpl=&stat=)
"Cotton" - Amer.Eskie (http://www.petfinder.org/pet.cgi?action=2&pet=3315020&adTarget=468doggeneral&SessionID=4145b7bc26b1cea9-app4&display=&preview=1&row=0&tmpl=&stat=)
"Chief" - small beagle (http://www.petfinder.org/pet.cgi?action=2&pet=3135993&adTarget=468doggeneral&SessionID=4145bb4247223e8d-app4&display=&preview=1&row=0&tmpl=&stat=)

raingirl
September 13th, 2004, 01:23 PM
Chief is cute, but all the others have long hair. We are looking for one with short hair that doesn't require a lot of care/brushing. I heard that the smaller the dog, the higher the energy and the more likely it will get lonely during the day. I was under the impression that none of those dogs would be good for an apartment.

And larger dogs need more space. That's why we were thinking medium sized, low energy dogs.

MBRA518
September 13th, 2004, 02:21 PM
And larger dogs need more space. That's why we were thinking medium sized, low energy dogs.

That's a good plan, but I don't know that I'd consider a boxer a "low energy" dog. As they get older maybe, but my family has had 2 and I've known people with boxers and they are not low energy dogs... certainly not high energy... but not low. I'd rank a boxer with my rottie's energy level - about moderate.

Luba
September 13th, 2004, 02:22 PM
I'm sorry but what you are asking for just doesn't exsist.
You're asking for a dog designed not to be a dog...

something quiet, non shedding, doesn't require grooming or too much exercise. Truthfully if thats what you're looking for then maybe a dog isn't for you. Why are there so many limitations?

Dogs bark, whine, cry and MOST shed and almost ALL dogs require quite a bit of exercise and ALL dogs require grooming.

Whew!! Why is it that you want a dog? I'm not being sarcastic but to be honest with you what you're asking for is like a genetically mutant form of what a dog 'isn't!!

There's a lot of things to consider when getting a dog and if you have that many issues/concerns already before you even get the dog...what will you do if the dog is a barker, likes to dig/scratch....loves to run and play, sheds too much??? Will you then dump the dog off at a shelter and try again?

Please remember, I'm NOT being sarcastic just trying to understand.

raingirl
September 13th, 2004, 02:56 PM
Oh, I don't mind if they shed at all and I don't mind if they require a lot of excercise. I plan on long walks each day. I just figured that a high excersise dog might not like an apartment all day long alone. A low excersise one would be happy to sleep all day and get excercise at night when we are home. And the grooming thing doesn't have to do with shedding, it's just that I don't know anything about grooming, so I figured a short hair one that only requires brushing every once in a while might be better. I know some short hair ones shed more than long hair, and that's fine. Heck..I already shed a ton myself!! You find my blond hairs everywhere where I live!!

And I didn't say it had to be quiet...did I? I guess because it's an apartment, it would probably be considerate to neighbours to have less barking. we are at the end of a hall, so no one will be walking by at all, except the people across from us. I was planing on using one of those baby cage door things to block the dog from the front hall by the door, so it doesn't bark at all the sounds outside.

I'm a little confused too..aren't all the dogs on the list, with the exception of maybe beagles, large dogs?? I don't know as I can't tell from a pic what the scale is. I thought all cold weather dogs aren't good indoors, and prefer outdoors, so I didn't even look at huskies, eskies, etc. I like chow chows, but I can't imagine brushing all that hair!!

I found this website, but I thought that a lot of those dogs would not be suitable because of size...any thoughts? Should I beleive this list?http://www.canismajor.com/dog/apart.html

I'm an investigator by profession, so I like to investigate EVERYTHING about EVERYTHING before jumping into something...

Princesss04
September 13th, 2004, 03:25 PM
I have a Brittany Spanial and they are okay to live in apartments as long as they have plenty of exercise and love. Meat Loaf (our dog) is a wonderful dog. We brush him, but he does not shed alot. They are not huge dogs. Although they like to bark but you can teach them to be quite that is what we have done with ours. Now grant it we do not live in an apartment, but he would do fine if we did. They are sleepers he loves to sleep as long as it is with you. He will sleep all night until we get up. They love to be with you. They are wonderful with children and older people very friendly to everyone. They are wonderful dogs in general. :D

Writing4Fun
September 13th, 2004, 03:29 PM
LOL! Well, you sure are investigating this to death - but in this case, that's a GOOD thing!

Here's my opinion on some of the ones you've listed:
-terriers - LOTS of different kinds of terriers, from toy to large! Check them all out carefully. Terriers can be "confident" dogs. :)
-retrievers - again, there are a few different kinds. Labs are considered large, but they can also be couch potatoes. My brother has a 90lb Lab mix, and he's essentially a sloth.
-spaniels - again, lots of different kinds. Grooming can be tedious, but a friend of mine just keeps his Springer shaved
Opinions vary as to what a "large" breed is. The general concensus seems to be any dog that is 50+lbs on maturity.

What you might want to focus on is suitability for a 1st time owner. Some of the dogs you mentioned will walk all over you if you don't know how to handle them, and you'll end up with a bored Alpha dog that's tearing your apartment up and won't listen to a word you say.

Let me see if I can pin this down for you a little: You're looking for a dog with moderate grooming (meaning a weekly brushing, no trimming). You aren't particular about size, but would prefer med-large (would 40-60lbs be a good range?). You'll definitely want a dog that's good for a first-time owner. You want one that's easy to train, not so much an "independent thinker". And you'd like one that isn't known to get bored and chew through walls. Is that about right? Maybe that will help folks get a better idea of what you're looking for. :D

iRONKNiGHT
September 13th, 2004, 04:50 PM
We are looking for one with short hair that doesn't require a lot of care/brushing.

:confused: :confused: :confused: raingirl are you Sure it's a pet you want?? One of the MANY joy's of owning a dog or cat is being able to BRUSH your pet not only you're taking care of their coat but you're also bonding,building trust and aid in making your pet look their fullest...


Everything else i would like to say Luba has graciously said...
we're not here to offend you but i hope you do take everything said into consideration...it's nice that you' came to seek Knowledge from experienced pet owners..just remember a pet is like a child you have to love, care, protect and you'll be rewarded with unmatched love..

I'm an investigator by profession, so I like to investigate EVERYTHING about EVERYTHING before jumping into something...
:) you're on the Right Track...

glasslass
September 13th, 2004, 04:58 PM
Not trying to change the thread, but everyone notice how many of the breeds on that list are also endangered by BSL? It would seem that more deserve favorable recognition for the wonderful service these dogs perform!

heeler's rock!
September 13th, 2004, 05:34 PM
I agree that it depends on the dog's personality that you get and at what age. My dog Red is an australian cattle dog (which is supposed to be high energy,) that I rescued at 5 years old. She's great! She has the right amount of energy. Not too hyper, not too lazy. She's ready to go when I am! She's perfectly content sitting around and sleeping all day if I'm working. She's never EVER chewed anything because she's older and she does shed, but only needs brushing and nail trimming every now and then. She'd be the world's best apartment dog!

Definitely look for an older dog, no younger than 3 years I would say, as 3 is when most dogs become mentally mature and start to come out of that puppy destruction phase. They can still be energized, but not as destructive. Breed doesn't count for much, except for tendencies. But with dogs being cross bred and such, it really depends on their temperment. Good luck!!

Luba
September 13th, 2004, 05:44 PM
I think I'll make a suggestion that I've made before, consider fostering a dog for a rescue.

First it gives you experience and second you can always adopt the dog you foster.

Best of luck.

Lucky Rescue
September 13th, 2004, 05:49 PM
but I don't know that I'd consider a boxer a "low energy" dog

I would consider boxers, as a breed, to be neither small nor low energy!!

raingirl, that canis major site you linked shows terriers as being low to moderate energy. I've never seen a low energy terrier, although I'm sure some exist somewhere.

You want a dog who is quiet, who will sleep on the couch all day, has short hair, yet will enjoy long walks.

A greyhound or whippet would be perfect for that situation. They are generally not barky, require moderate grooming (brushing and baths only) and are usually couch potatoes. The only restriction is that it never be allowed off leash except in a safe area.

LavenderRott
September 13th, 2004, 05:53 PM
Check into a greyhound rescue group. Most of the dogs are retired track dogs that have never had good food or been in a house. When rescue gets them they are filthy, thin, scared, usually sick and or injured and fresh off the track. After a couple of weeks with a foster family they are sweet, kind, quiet, used to new "house" things and more then ready for a family to love.

jenjen
September 13th, 2004, 06:07 PM
I don't know if this will help, but a Sheltie might be a good idea. They are not large dogs, and I think would do fine in an apartment. They do have a lot of hair though and need a good brush at least once a day. Not heavy grooming but a good brush. I have one (she lives with my parents) but spent many nights at my apartment for sleepovers and shes fine. If you even ask her if she wants to come to my house she gets so excited. They are a lovely breed and very smart. Just another option.....Good luck

jenjen
September 13th, 2004, 06:10 PM
One more thing if you go to any search engine and look for "sheltie Rescue" There are a bunch of them for every province

Luba
September 13th, 2004, 07:07 PM
We are looking for one with short hair that doesn't require a lot of care/brushing.

I think they'd be interested in something else

raingirl
September 14th, 2004, 07:54 AM
Wow. Lots of suggestions.

We just got some books last night so we are still researching.

What you might want to focus on is suitability for a 1st time owner. Some of the dogs you mentioned will walk all over you if you don't know how to handle them, and you'll end up with a bored Alpha dog that's tearing your apartment up and won't listen to a word you say.

Let me see if I can pin this down for you a little: You're looking for a dog with moderate grooming (meaning a weekly brushing, no trimming). You aren't particular about size, but would prefer med-large (would 40-60lbs be a good range?). You'll definitely want a dog that's good for a first-time owner. You want one that's easy to train, not so much an "independent thinker". And you'd like one that isn't known to get bored and chew through walls. Is that about right? Maybe that will help folks get a better idea of what you're looking for.

That's exactly what I was trying to say!! I don't mind brushing a dog daily, just not for like...3 hours!! A quick once over type thing. I think any size dog is fine, just not a small small one, I don't like any of the toys or tiny ones like most people have in apartments (poodles, shih zhu, lhasa apso, bichon frise). I definately want a good "first time owner" type dog, easy to train. My SO and I both agree we would get a golden retreiver in a second if we had a house. I've also always wanted a husky or malamute. But again, apartments aren't suitable for those. And it's sad because there are a lot of them for adoption. We saw on one rescue site a golden/great dane cross. She was beautiful, but not an option. And because we are gone all day at work, we need one who is content to be alone and not get bored and tear the place apart! I know training has a lot to do with that though. We are looking for a mature dog as well...which I know will make a difference in temperment.

:o

raingirl
September 14th, 2004, 07:55 AM
Sorry, one more thing. Luba, you suggested fostering. We considered that, but was told that only people who know about dogs are allowed to foster (because we've never had a dog before, they wouldn't consider it).

moontamara
September 14th, 2004, 08:46 AM
raingirl,

I'm impressed with the work you're putting into this!! Just curious why you've ruled out those adorable lap dogs -- is it because they seem too needy, or is it from meeting too many yappy/bitey ones? I grew up with many dogs, all sizes, and the pet that absolutely EVERYONE loved the most was a black toy poodle named Lucy! Most people were surprised to learn she was a poodle because we didn't keep her in a poodle cut. I'm not saying you should get a poodle, or any other lap dog -- they are on the needy side! But I just don't want you to be ruling them out based on stereotypes. They can be amazing pets (and they can be yappy, snappy little horrors too, but it mostly depends on the owners)

raingirl
September 14th, 2004, 09:30 AM
It's not because of any stereo types..i just dont think they "match" us. They don't match our personality. Plus, I have the impression that they would be too active during the day and tear the place apart more than a mediium or large dog. I imagine them jumping up on the window sill and barking at everyone below...and running up and down my long living room/dining room for hours on end. And as you say, they are a little needy. I don't really mind that, but it might be a problem during the day when we are not there.

moontamara
September 14th, 2004, 09:35 AM
True enough, raingirl, and I hope you didn't think I was criticizing your opinion. I think it's wonderful that you know what you want and you're actively researching it so well!!! If only everyone did that!!! It may seem to some that you're being too picky, but I for one think that you're just doing the right thing to succeed with this, which so many people do not. Good luck!!!

raingirl
September 14th, 2004, 09:55 AM
my biggest worry is that I'll get a dog that doesn't suit us, and we'll end up having to send him back..which would be horrible. I'm under the impression that's a big factor as to why there are so many rescue dogs..people get them and don't know what they are getting into.

PLus, I'm a perfectionist..if I do something and it goes wrong, it detours me from ever doing it again (I tend to give up easily). So..I guess I'm kinda looking for the perfect dog..which I know is wrong. But at least i'm trying my best to make the best fit in our situation.

Writing4Fun
September 14th, 2004, 09:59 AM
Raingirl, you are going about it exactly the right way! :D Training is a big part of how a dog turns out, and I'm sure you'll be great at it. At the very least, you know that you won't be one of those people who buys a Lab and then dumps it at a shelter because "it got too big". :rolleyes: Those are the folks who could learn a thing or two from you!!

Cflat
September 14th, 2004, 11:01 AM
Maybe you should just go and visit your local shelter. Take a couple of types of dogs for a walk in their walking area. You may be totally surprised at what rings your bell, dog wise. Don't get too stuck on a specific breed's traits, looks or size. When you actually get a dog, you can throw half of it right out of the window.

Luba
September 14th, 2004, 12:49 PM
raingirl if you want to foster pm me and I'll direct you :D

Lucky Rescue
September 14th, 2004, 02:03 PM
I'm a perfectionist..if I do something and it goes wrong, it detours me from ever doing it again (I tend to give up easily). So..I guess I'm kinda looking for the perfect dog..

Uh oh. I don't know you or what your tolerance levels are, but I can say that most of the animals people try and dump on us are being given up because they are not perfect, or because someone made a half hearted effort at training and the dog didn't catch on right away.

Bringing a new animal in to the home usually requires large amounts of patience and persistance. Training is an ongoing process, and even housetrained, good dogs may have accidents in the new home, or bark, or dig, or chew or do other things you may not like.

If you want a perfect dog, there is no such thing.

heeler's rock!
September 14th, 2004, 03:20 PM
The biggest thing that makes people give dogs back is that they don't give it enough time. You can't know what dog is best for you after an hour of walking time at the shelter. If you love the dog, you can teach it anything! Even to not chew, bark, bite, etc. I truly believe a dog is what you make it....all it takes is time and patience.... :D

raingirl
September 14th, 2004, 03:28 PM
Take a couple of types of dogs for a walk in their walking area.

I thought you couldn't take dogs out! Most sites/places I've read about says you aren't allowed to touch/pet the dogs for some reason...I think according to the toronto humane society site it spreads disease?? I just figured all places were like that.

Plus, we don't have a local shelter in Brampton, and I do not own a car. That's why i'm relying on the internet for my research. (I heard there's one shelter somewhere in Brampton but I have no idea where, and never see posts for animals from there online)

Writing4Fun
September 14th, 2004, 03:48 PM
Here you go, raingirl! :D
http://www.city.brampton.on.ca/city_dept/works_trans/Animal_Services/Adoption_Area/home.taf?rnav=249

Cflat
September 14th, 2004, 06:11 PM
Well I'm not sure about where you are but where I am we can do that (take the dog to the common area to walk). Who would adopt a dog they had never even touched before? I don't think there is a dog that is perfect for you, I think there are several. Its like finding a partner. There are lots of dogs out there that will be wonderful to live with. Granted they may need a little help getting there and the first 6-8 weeks can be tough sometimes. Our most recent addition was hellish at first and I doubted myself and my choice. She has become my soul-dog. I can't imagine a better choice. You'll feel that too, but don't make your expectations too high.

raingirl
September 15th, 2004, 08:48 AM
http://www.city.brampton.on.ca/city...me.taf?rnav=249

Thanks for the link, but I didn't think that place was worth visiting as they rarely have any pets. Today, there is only one dog...the other day there were a couple..but they are gone. It seems they mostly have cats. I've been watching thier website only as I can't get to that location (but they don't update their website often and they don't use petfinder)..there are no buses that go there and I do not have a car. For me to get to that location, it means borrowing a car which is inconvenient just to go if there turns out to be no dogs.

Writing4Fun
September 15th, 2004, 08:57 AM
Well, it might be worth the shot just to put your name on their waiting list. If anything comes in, at least they'll give you a shout. Would a taxi cost a lot? Too bad I don't live a little closer, or I'd offer to chauffeur you around to look at puppies! :D