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Minimizing cat fur!

SneakyCat
April 22nd, 2010, 09:05 PM
Hi everyone,

I just recently adopted two male cats but one of them looks like a maine coon and is leaving hair EVERYWHERE! I live in a one bedroom apartment with hardwood floor and I'm always seeing bits of fur just floating around the air. It's getting into my food!!!

I'm completely totally smitten with the shorthaired one, and have no problems with him, but the two boys grew up together so I know if I want to keep the shorthaired one, I will need to put up with the longhaired one's fur. I don't want to separate them!


So here's my question:

1. Where might I find a good affordable groomer to give the cat a haircut? I would never shave him, just looking to trim his overgrown furriness. I'm thinking a lioncut might be cute on him! I am located in Vancouver.

2. How much does the cost range around?

3. How long would the hairtrim/lioncut last? Is once a year good enough?

4. How much fur does your cat leave around your home? I understand cats shed when stressed, so since I just recently got them, he may be shedding more than usual. But what is considered normal shedding?

5. Any advice for minimizing the amount of fur hanging around? They're already eating the best quality food I could get from the vet, getting frequent brushing from me, and I'm hoping to give them a bath once they're more comfortable around me (and when it gets warmer around here so they don't catch a cold!)

6. The owner is willing to take the longhaired one back, as the only reason she put them up for adoption is because her building policy doesn't allow cats, but they made an exception and allowed her to keep ONE. However recently they found out she's actually keeping TWO... and they're unhappy.
The two boys are not brothers, but they were adopted together as kittens. They two boys are actually only just under 2 years old, so they're still fairly young. They often groom each other and get along greet.
So my question is, would they be very affected if I split them up? I really don't want to hurt them, but I can't stand the extra fur floating around either :(


Please let me know and thank you for all your advice!

14+kitties
April 22nd, 2010, 09:24 PM
Where to start..........
Not addressing the lion cut. I know nothing about it except it looks a little goofy to me.
The pair sounds like they are bonded. IMO it would be a shame to separate them. But if you don't see yourself bonding with the one it would not be fair to him to keep him. He will pick up on your feelings.
Have you tried the Furminator? http://www.tesco-shopping.com/Furminator.htm
You can find it in any good pet store.
Vets do not sell good quality food. Good quality food is canned or raw foods which do not have any grains, corn or by products in it. www.catinfo.org is a great site to read to educate yourself in what foods are the best for your cats. Changing them to the best food you can feed them will help with fur loss as well.
Cats do not need baths unless they have gotten into a pile of dirt they can not clean off themselves with grooming. It will not help the fur issue and may dry out their skin causing more dander and issues for them.
Cats do tend to shed more when stressed. As stated, cats can pick up on feelings and may continue to be stressed. Also, if kitties have been in the same home since they were adopted it may take a while for them to settle and get over the stress.
And you do not want to know how much fur is around my house. :D

Goldfields
April 23rd, 2010, 02:35 AM
You maybe haven't seen a fur problem until you bath that long coated cat. I don't know, it may only be Persians with their super fine hair, the slightest air movement and it floats, sticking to anything it lands on, so bathing and blow drying them(which is the only way I do it, to make sure the cat is totally dry and warm) means hair EVERYWHERE! :laughing: I'm cursing the whole time I do Pheobe, :D who incidentally came to us with a problem that required bathing and rinsing her a couple of times. I agree with 14+ that it dries out their coat so I don't reccomend it either. Because I showed shelties I abhor the idea of shaving them or long coated cats, that coat really is their crowning glory, so I hope 14+'s advice works for you and you can learn to live with your lovely cat.

MyBirdIsEvil
April 23rd, 2010, 07:22 AM
Diet is often a huge factor. A low quality, especially dry, diet often makes cats shed more. Just because you got the food from a vet doesn't mean it's high quality, those foods are often actually lower quality if you read the ingredients.
Science Diet, Royal Canin, Iams, Purina, all commonly sold by vets is not very good quality.

You mention you brush often, but what kind brush are you using? Not all of them work that well, so you may be doing it for nothing. I use the ones with really stiff close together metal bristles that are angled backward, and those work the best. A rake with close together prongs works for spots where a lot of hair is coming off, then you can go over it with the brush. For cats with sensitive skin, or where the coat isn't very thick to protect the skin, you can get them with little rubber things on the end, though I've never found that to be necessary.
You shouldn't be needing to brush heavily daily with a proper brush. Just a little bit of a going over.
Also, you mention you just adopted them, so maybe he wasn't being brushed enough and was being fed crappy food, so you'll have to give it time for the shedding to stop. And yes, stress IS a factor. Being moved will definitely make a cat shed more than usual.
Also note, that it is that time of year when cats will sometimes shed more. Like dogs some will start to blow their undercoat. Even if they are indoor cats this can happen, though not to the extent of outdoor cats.

Some cats do just shed more than others :shrug:. My parents cat gets fed canned food and is short haired and still sheds like crazy.

As far as how much my own cats shed, not a lot, but I have 10 of them so I have fur everywhere anyway :laughing:.

I wouldn't separate them if they're happy together. If they're used to having a companion they will probably not be as happy alone. Some cats are very social. And it's not a case of you can just get another companion for the one, because cats tend to be picky about who they get along with and how well. I would just be happy you have 2 cats that are getting along and enjoy each others company :shrug:

catlover2
April 23rd, 2010, 07:36 AM
Mother Nature is telling animals that summer is coming, and most animals drop coat at this time of year. So coat drop is really related to longer days of light and not whether it's an indoor or outdoor cat. Cats drop coat Spring and again in Fall basically, tho some cats will shed year round (loose coat) or drop minimally (tight coat). I always found that shorthair cats that had loose coats were the worst, as the hair can weave into some fabrics, whereas longhairs it's fluff that lays on suface of things and is easily picked or vacuumed up. Leather furniture is good! Now I have Devon Rex, so their coat drop is miniscule year round, but even now they dropping a bit more than usual.

I used to have longhair cats, and the only way to cope at this time of year is to comb twice a day ---a chrome or steel pet comb (available from pet stores) with a fine side and courser side works well. At other times between coat drop combing once a day is usually sufficient. This will go a long way to eliminating a lot of hair floating around. Combing is better for the coat than brushing. It's essential to get longhaired kittens used to being combed every day---even though kittens don't drop coat---so that they enjoy being groomed. It wil pay off in the long run. Always make grooming a pleasurable experience and don't pull tats; cut them out. Always reward cat with a treat after grooming and most cats will get excited about grooming as soon as they see you with a comb. :thumbs up :cat:

quincymycat
April 23rd, 2010, 10:01 AM
Hi everyone,

I just recently adopted two male cats but one of them looks like a maine coon and is leaving hair EVERYWHERE! I live in a one bedroom apartment with hardwood floor and I'm always seeing bits of fur just floating around the air. It's getting into my food!!!

I'm completely totally smitten with the shorthaired one, and have no problems with him, but the two boys grew up together so I know if I want to keep the shorthaired one, I will need to put up with the longhaired one's fur. I don't want to separate them!


So here's my question:

1. Where might I find a good affordable groomer to give the cat a haircut? I would never shave him, just looking to trim his overgrown furriness. I'm thinking a lioncut might be cute on him! I am located in Vancouver.

2. How much does the cost range around?

3. How long would the hairtrim/lioncut last? Is once a year good enough?

4. How much fur does your cat leave around your home? I understand cats shed when stressed, so since I just recently got them, he may be shedding more than usual. But what is considered normal shedding?

5. Any advice for minimizing the amount of fur hanging around? They're already eating the best quality food I could get from the vet, getting frequent brushing from me, and I'm hoping to give them a bath once they're more comfortable around me (and when it gets warmer around here so they don't catch a cold!)

6. The owner is willing to take the longhaired one back, as the only reason she put them up for adoption is because her building policy doesn't allow cats, but they made an exception and allowed her to keep ONE. However recently they found out she's actually keeping TWO... and they're unhappy.
The two boys are not brothers, but they were adopted together as kittens. They two boys are actually only just under 2 years old, so they're still fairly young. They often groom each other and get along greet.
So my question is, would they be very affected if I split them up? I really don't want to hurt them, but I can't stand the extra fur floating around either :(


Please let me know and thank you for all your advice!

Welcome. I can appreciate your problems with fur...I have 3 Maine Coons, a Ragdoll and DSH. Obviously the majority of the floating hair comes from the first 4, but you would be surprised what a DSH can leave behind as well, so removing the long haired cat may not fix your problem entirely.
Further along those lines, if the long haired cat is stressed by his new enviroment and not feeling like he is well thought of, that equals even more hair shedding.

Question 1. I personally think the lion cut looks silly, but if you want less hair and it would allow you to keep both kitties and not split them up, then I would advise doing it. As for finding a good groomer, it took me a while to find one here as many groomers do not want to do cats. Try the yellow pages, ask vets offices....I know after I found mine my vet kept her name for clients who would ask her for referrals. I had no problem recommending my groomer she is great.....except when Quincy was sick and having trouble with self care she recommended a lion cut! :yell:
I did not do it.

2. Here in Toronto, a groom, which includes a bath, fantastic comb out of the huge amount of underhair, nail trim and blow dry is $48.00. If the kitty has to be dematted in several places, the cost is $55.00. I do not know the cost of the lion cut, but it would likely just be considered a groom.

3.I do not how long it will last, my estimation it would need to be done twice a year.

4. My cats leave fur around.....all pets do. I am very good about keeping on top of things though and I would recommend a Swiffer floor duster, I don't like the generic brands, the Swiffer works better. Before you do your floor with the fresh cloth, wipe your surfaces like tables counters etc, then do the floors. This works for me.

5. was already answered very well by 14+Kitties.

6.My cats all know each other and look for anyone who is missing even for half a day to go to the groomer or vet. IMO, I would try not to separate them as you would be putting them back into an enviroment where the cat would again have to be rehomed or worse. Can you not give the kitty a chance?

Someone mentioned the Furminator brush. Excellent product, a bit costly over regular brushes, but you will not be able to groom with this brush in any room you do not want fur to float around for a while after. It really removes alot of old hair and definately worth the price.

I wish you luck.

t.pettet
April 24th, 2010, 07:14 PM
A cat moulting comb and cat slicker brush should help to control the shedding if used 2-3 times per week. Both are available for under $20 from most pet stores. The comb has irregular teeth and gets right down to the skin and the slicker has soft bristles that most cats love being brushed with.

Love4himies
April 24th, 2010, 07:24 PM
You maybe haven't seen a fur problem until you bath that long coated cat. I don't know, it may only be Persians with their super fine hair, the slightest air movement and it floats, sticking to anything it lands on, so bathing and blow drying them(which is the only way I do it, to make sure the cat is totally dry and warm) means hair EVERYWHERE! :laughing: I'm cursing the whole time I do Pheobe, :D who incidentally came to us with a problem that required bathing and rinsing her a couple of times. I agree with 14+ that it dries out their coat so I don't reccomend it either. Because I showed shelties I abhor the idea of shaving them or long coated cats, that coat really is their crowning glory, so I hope 14+'s advice works for you and you can learn to live with your lovely cat.

I have a Himalayan who had championship quality fur and yes, their fur floats :laughing:. She is 14 years old.


Sneakycat, I find feeding a really good quality canned food cut the shedding in half with my cats.

Here are some good ones;

Wellness canned, grain free
Nature's Variety Instinct, canned.

Tundra_Queen
April 25th, 2010, 01:43 AM
Hi

I have 4 cats. 3 dsh and 1 long haired.

Darby, one of the dsh, shed more than Willie, who is the long haired one, but I would say all the dsh shed tons more than Willie does which surprised me.

I use a brush with hard metal bristles on willie a few times a week. I think it was a dog's brush..it's been a long time since I bought it so I forget.

I wouldn't get rid of your lh cat because of the shedding because the 2 cats are bonded and need company.

Willie was an only cat for 6 years before I got O'Shawnnessey and his sister Mirabelle and it was the best thing I ever did! It made Willie so much more active and playful and HAPPIER! Even though he can have his grumpy moments, he runs thru the house chasing the others and plays with the other cats and meows for them if they are on another floor. I put down receiving blankets on the couch and just change them ever couple of days, they grab alot of the hair too.

Debbie