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Dog jumps up - Answered by J. Sansregret

psl_023
September 1st, 2004, 10:44 PM
My dog, a 17week old rottweiller jumps on everyone. When someone goes out to play with him the first thing he does is jump on them. Also, when we go for walks he bites the leash alot and he chews on everything. Yesterday I caught him trying to knock over our garbage can. Please help.

Luba
September 1st, 2004, 10:46 PM
First off don't expect too much from your pup but try to convert the bad behaviour into good.

What kind of obedience training are you doing and what are you trying to do to currently correct some of these problems?

TalonsMa
September 3rd, 2004, 10:24 AM
Ha ha ha sounds like what Solara does! Except she's 9 weeks. We're working on getting her to sit when ppl want to pat her, but she's so young still, I don't expect that to come right away. We had bought a book called "Labrador Retreivers for Dummies", I would recommend it to anyone. It had alot of great info in it. Anyways, we're teachng her "off" & "take it" so that when she has her leash n her mouth we can say "off" and she will drop it. Doesn't workk all the time, but again shes just a baby. Also, we never leave her outside unsupervised, I read somewhere that if you can't watch the puppy 100% of the time, then it should be somewhere safe ie. crate etc. I think that makes sense :)
Training a puppy takes alot of time & effort, as well as being consistent. Don't be too hard on yourself. It'll come together in time!

ShielaMonique
September 6th, 2004, 06:45 PM
for the leash thing put tabbasco sause on the leash...if its not a metal one that is. it will give him/her a shocker but it worked when i had a dog like that :)

Writing4Fun
September 6th, 2004, 09:50 PM
for the leash thing put tabbasco sause on the leash...if its not a metal one that is. it will give him/her a shocker but it worked when i had a dog like that :)
Sure, works great unless you have a dog like my brother's who thought the tabasco sauce just made the leather leash even tastier! :D

ShoeHorn!!
September 8th, 2004, 09:54 AM
Hello :)

Im usually lurking around here, reading everyones experiences with their furry babes. (we've been looking into getting a new puppy for a long time and ya'll have been a lot of help with the planning parts. Thanks much!!)

The hot sauce comment gave me a flashback to when my last dog was a puppy. His favorite chew toy in the house was our carpet. My husband at the time *knew* how to make him stop. He decided to sprinkle chili powder and red pepper onto "his" spot. Well.. bout 2am in the morning, we wake up to him sneezing and licking and sneezing and licking and chewing and sneezing and chewing and sneezing. Needless to say I was laughing hysterically.. the ex hubby was not impressed. :D

TalonsMa
September 8th, 2004, 02:30 PM
LMAO!! That is too funny! I am going to try putting it on her leash tho. She doesn't put it in her mouth as much as she's used, but my neighbors showed her what fun tug-of-war can be. I was not impressed, so now I have another habit to break.....sigh

melanie
September 8th, 2004, 05:25 PM
have you considered puppy preschool, good for general first training.
jumping- every time the dog jumps on someone, gently put the dog back down while saying 'no', or 'no jumping' (say it firmly but dont yell), if done consistantly enough the dog will get the idea.

CarlaD
September 9th, 2004, 10:46 AM
Both Willy and Charlie love Tobasco sauce! Noah put it on something last weekend, (mostly for Charlie) and they loved it!

ShielaMonique
September 9th, 2004, 10:58 AM
it works for alot of thing nail bitters animal and human, if a teething dog chews on one certain place you could use this trick. And also for some reason pepermint is great for in your plants against cats :)

Writing4Fun
September 9th, 2004, 10:59 AM
Puppy Kindergarten - definitely! :cool: As for the jumping, our instructor showed us a little something. Put the dog's leash on, then put him in a "sit". Let the leash hang to the floor, then stand on it so that it gets tight only if the dog tries to get his front paws off the ground (we only use flat collars, not choke or prong collars). Talk to him and try to get him a little riled, to the point where he normally jumps up (Phoebe would jump whenever you spoke to her). As soon as the dog tries to jump up, he'll automatically correct himself. He'll do this a couple of times before he realizes that he can't jump up. When he stops jumping, give him LOTS of praise and a couple of treats. Phoebe tried jumping twice. Then she just sat there politely no matter how much the instructor tried to excite her into jumping! We've now progressed to sitting politely for pets from a stranger. :D

Spoiled
September 12th, 2004, 09:55 PM
When he jumps up, ignore it. When he stops jumping, praise him. Its a lot easier to stop the behavior now than when he's huge and older.

Try obedience training him, and crateing him when you aren't watching him. Always remember, a quiet puppy is almost always one that is into something.

petdr
September 14th, 2004, 12:09 PM
Hi,

This dog needs a job to channel his energy to do good. It sounds like the dog wants attention and that's why he is doing this. What you want to do is give the dog attention when he's doing something good.

When the dog jumps up, it is a self rewarding behaviour. Don't add to it by showing attention in any way...so no petting or eye contact. Turn around and fold your arms. Tell others to do the same. Train the dog to sit and give him a strong reward (food, toys, whatever works for him) so that he sits every time. When he is about to jump use the sit command and reward him. He can't jump if he's sitting. This dog needs to be refocused every time he tries to jump up.

This dog is a bit too old and probably too bullish for puppy obedience class. Enroll him in an adult or adolescent obedience class where the extra distractions in the class are great teaching tools to get the dog to listen and respect you no matter what's going on. Find a scool that teaches motivational techniques- not physical corrections for bad behaviour.

When you are outdoors you can use a head halter to control sudden jumping. http://www.pets.ca/articles/article-doghalter.htm


Julie Sansregret - AHT, Dog trainer
Guides Canins
1313, rue PineRidge,
St-Lazare-de-Vaudreuil, Qué.
J7T 2M7 (450) 424-1469
www.guidescanins.com

nek1973
January 5th, 2006, 04:21 PM
These all make me laugh - love the tabasco sauce!

I have a 10 month old Soft Coated Wheaton - VERY EXCITABLE.

We conquered the "sit", but are having a hard time with the jumping. He gets so excited he cant even hear us say no.

How can we calm him down enough for him to understand not to jump?

He is my little :evil: !

tenderfoot
January 5th, 2006, 05:08 PM
We believe in actively teaching correct manners - which means that You are in charge of his manners and need to direct him to make better choices. The problem is that when he greets people it typically happns one time - they stay for a while and leave. The original greeting was failure if he jumped up, so we need to recreate the event again and again until he learns to do better and then repeat it at least once to see that success has been reached.
Turning away typically empowers you dog as he forced you to back away from him. So put him on the leash and teach the correct response. Anticipate his actions - you know when hes going to do it. Stop him when its a thought before it becomes an action - it's easier for him to stop himself then too.
Jumping on you - Jumping is a symptom of lack of respect. A dog who respects people will not jump on them unless they are invited to.
We teach the "off" which means four feet on the ground. It is off of the couch, off of me, off of other people.
We can walk into someone’s home for training and their dog will not jump on us to the amazement of their people. It can be as simple as the attitude you walk in with.
When he is jumping on you and you tell him off - Do not PUSH him down - that is a game to him and he doesn't take you seriously. Make your hand flat and palms towards him and you can "pop" the air in front of him and walk towards him (making him back up). Do not HIT him that is not what this is about - setting a boundary with your hands and energy is very different than hitting him. Simply create a boundary that he is not welcome in and MEAN IT. If he jumps up and touches your 'popping' hand it will be uncomfortable for him and after a few tries it will no longer be fun and he should give up and hopefully sit asking "well what can I do?” When he sits, then reward him with praise and soft touch.
Ideally you have to stop him as he is thinking about jumping up not when he is half way in the air - he can't stop himself then. So show him your flat palms and say 'off' just as you see him thinking about jumping up. This is teaching you to read your dog's thoughts and to react in time to help him make a better choice. Always use just enough energy to get results - not so too much so you intimidate him but not so little that he blows you off. Each time and day might be a little more or less according to his mood, and as he gains respect for your word then it will be come just the hand signal or just the word and barely any energy at all.
The key is that you re-create the situation and correct the bad choices and give him another chance to make a better choice. Pat your chest with energy and when you even see him thinking about jumping, you say 'off' and show him your flat hands be ready to snap them in his direction if he keeps jumping. Back him up and have a firm tone in your voice (not loud). Invite him in again and again until he chooses to sit for his greeting.
The problem is usually people teach failure not success. A dog jumps up you eventually get them off and then the day goes on - but the dog never learned not to jump up. You have to give him multiple chances to make a better choice and then do it once more to enforce it and then reward the heck out of him for the good choice.
This can be taught in five minutes if done correctly.
Jumping on Others - You as the parent dictate your dogs manners. Know that he will want to jump so set him up for learning. Put him on the leash and have a friend just stand there and do nothing – you approach the person with you dog from across the room. As you see your dog start to shift his weight to jump up, you give a leash correction and say ‘OFF’ in a firm (not loud) tone and walk away from the person.
Then you do it again. Each time giving a correction for the bad choice and walking away. In about three tries your dog should start to realize his mistakes and stay down – typically he will actually sit on his own volition. When he is good, then reward him with praise and soft touch. Repeat this game a couple of more times to ensure success and learning.
Ideally you have to stop him as he is thinking about jumping up not when he is half way in the air - he can't stop himself then. Try to anticipate his actions and tell him ‘off’ before he has a chance to react. This is teaching you to read your dog's thoughts and to react in time to help him make a better choice. Always use just enough energy to get results - not so too much so you intimidate him but not so little that he blows you off. Each time and day might be a little more or less according to his mood, and as he gains respect for your word then it will be come just the hand signal or just the word and barely any energy at all.
The key is that you re-create the situation and correct the bad choices and give him another chance to make a better choice. As your dog gets good at this game, have the person pat their chest with energy and when you even see him thinking about jumping, you say 'off'. Invite him in again and again until he chooses to sit for his greeting.
The problem is usually people teach failure not success. A dog jumps up you eventually get them off and then the day goes on - but the dog never learned not to jump up. You have to give him multiple chances to make a better choice and then do it once more to enforce it and then reward the heck out of him for the good choice.
This can be taught in five minutes if done correctly.
Hope this helps.

gonementally2da
December 9th, 2006, 08:48 AM
These all make me laugh - love the tabasco sauce!

I have a 10 month old Soft Coated Wheaton - VERY EXCITABLE.

We conquered the "sit", but are having a hard time with the jumping. He gets so excited he cant even hear us say no.

How can we calm him down enough for him to understand not to jump?

He is my little :evil: !

maybe i can help, here's a trick that works great, i've never had a dog i've trained not respond to it and it's a gentle way of handling the "jumping" problem. every time your "little devil" jumps, raise your knee up- bocking the jump and making them uncomfortable the inability to reach you properly then as you do this firmly say "break it off" with each repeat of jumping, respond the same. this even works to stop a dog that isn't yours (we all have been visiting a friend who's dog jumps up as soon as you get there, trust me this works!) as for continuing with your dog, use this "break it off" command every time dog puts himself (whether it's one leg or four) on something he shouldn't. each time you use it, physically correct him by removing his paws from couch, table, ect. once your dog is used to this command you can then use it when he goes to jump on someone else a simple "break it off" and down he will go. also it's time to teach a "corrective sound", i personally use an "ack" sound, if you've ever seen the dog whisperer he uses a "ch" sound, by finding the sound you can make and using it before any corrective command (ex. dog jumps on you- up goes knee with a back of your throat "ack" sound and an immediate "break it off" and down dog goes, he repeats again, you repeat, after couple tries dog gets it and responds to command)

tenderfoot
December 11th, 2006, 11:34 AM
Just a note - this is a VERY old thread.

Please don't not KNEE your dog in the chest to teach him to stop jumping up. You can do great harm to the dog and the person can get set off balance and fall.

Kneeing a dog requires that the dog is already jumping up on you and he has no chance of stoping himself. Its like punching someone for having bumped into you - not the best way to get your message across.

Try to be proactive not reactive. You know when they are thinking about jumping up so use your voice and body language in advance. Stop the thought before it becomes an action. Teach what will get your attention and reward that.

gonementally2da
December 11th, 2006, 02:39 PM
[QUOTE=tenderfoot;333945]Just a note - this is a VERY old thread.

Please don't not KNEE your dog in the chest to teach him to stop jumping up. You can do great harm to the dog and the person can get set off balance and fall.

please don't think i meant actually "kneeing" the dog, i would never tell someone to do that, but raising a knee up as they jump doesn' nothing more than block them like you would with a hand, it is impossible to hurt them. i would NEVER condone ANY form of pain for any animal, that would make me a bad trainer (which i am not). if someone understood wrong i apologize.

Angie J
December 13th, 2006, 10:07 AM
Ive always found the clinically staged practice sessions most effective. Then when there is an ounce of success and understanding from the dog it can be encouraged and reenforced at other times (oh, too often at that age..lol) durring your daily routine.

Get a friend to help.. post a note on the outside of your door asking for EVERY visitor to knock and be prepared to participate in the new routine, asking them.. please dont accknowledge the dog until I have pup in a sit, have praised him, and have given you persmission to approach and pat (reward for positive action) the dog.

Angie