Pets.ca - Pet forum for dogs cats and humans 

-->

I need your opinions on which dog to get for the outdoors.

Telamonian
March 26th, 2010, 08:50 PM
Hey everyone

I was wondering if anyone can tell me their opinions on which type of dog would be suitable to outdoor living. A friend and I decided to live at cottage up in Nova Scotia, Canada. Kinda of an off-the-grid living style. Now my best friend has had many dogs before all bigger and stronger dogs (Boxer, and Mastiffs) which might be suitable for the harsh winters and exhausting daily works. But i've never really had pets, only when i was very young so no real experience.
If anyone can list some great outdoor dogs that can tolerate this type of life style i would be greatful. And also i would like a companion dog for those lonely times in the woods..haha

Chaser
March 26th, 2010, 11:16 PM
Will the dog be LIVING outside, or just spending a lot of time outdoors with you?

Mia101
March 26th, 2010, 11:50 PM
Akita! Just make sure to socialize it REALLY well from a VERY young age.

They will want to be indoors with you too, though. They are 'partner' oriented.

Etown_Chick
March 27th, 2010, 01:04 AM
Newfoundlands are made for the outdoors, a truly canadian breed.
Burnese Mountain dogs.
There's two ideas.

kungfuMao
March 27th, 2010, 01:57 AM
I've never had them before but wouldn't boxers and mastiffs get cold in the harsh climate? :shrug:
They have very short coats...

Maybe a german shepherd or a husky?

Telamonian
March 27th, 2010, 08:33 AM
They will be living indoors, but most of the time they'll be outdoors with us. The boxer and the mastiff seem to be doing alright in nova scotia but they've been indoors and havent truly experienced the cold winter yet

ownedbycats
March 27th, 2010, 12:33 PM
Bernese mountain dogs have serious genetic health and temperament problems unless very carefully bred. If you do decide on this breed research your breeder very,very carefully.

happycats
March 27th, 2010, 01:03 PM
Great pyraneese
Kuvasz
St bernard
Husky
Malamute

shirley1011
March 27th, 2010, 01:16 PM
If you aren't looking for a larger breed the Norwegian Elkhounds are fun little dogs and just love being outdoors...love the snow and hate to come in once they are out there playing.
63723

Longblades
March 27th, 2010, 06:34 PM
suitable for the harsh winters and exhausting daily works.Could you explain what you mean by this? You have said the dog will live indoors so where does the harsh come in? And the exhausting daily work? Are the dog(s) going to be required to do some kind of work? Are you planning to get more than one dog? I feel like I need more clues. :D

Telamonian
March 27th, 2010, 07:09 PM
Sorry, i didnt give enough information. well like i said, it would off the grid living jobs can vary, for example, the water tank is about 5-6 acres away from the cottage so we'll need to constantly bring water back to the cottage. they're really minor jobs like pulling gallon-ed water, pulling small broken branchs of trees (we just need kinda extra man power to help around when needed) i know i'm kinda asking alot out of these dogs. the boxer is handling it really well, but the mastiff is feels a little stressed out. we've notice him sleep alot more than usual could be a sign of fatigue or he just really hates it out here LOL!

Shirley1011 and happycats mentioned some good breeds. malamute and elkhounds are great dogs. and siberian huskies have a great lineage.

clm
March 27th, 2010, 08:15 PM
If you have other dogs, a Mal could be a problem. Otherwise, you couldn't ask for a better work dog than that. A Kuvasz would be my choice, I just love that breed. Bernese mountain dogs, Newfs, St. Bernards, Great Pyrs are all also good draft dogs with great cold resistant coats as well, but remember, the cold resistant dogs are not going to like hot summer work either, so you gotta keep that in mind too.

clm

Telamonian
March 27th, 2010, 08:27 PM
If you have other dogs, a Mal could be a problem. Otherwise, you couldn't ask for a better work dog than that.

we're gonna give the mastiff away to a relative but keep the boxer. Why would another dog be a problem with a Mal?

clm
March 27th, 2010, 08:36 PM
Mals are know for being great with people, but not so tolerant of other dogs.

clm

babymomma
March 27th, 2010, 09:23 PM
Same sex aggression is a big things in Mals. Be careful if looking for a Breeder for mals though. I would look more for a working bred mal then a show bred mal. Way too many mals are being bred "over the top" these days. Same with German shepherds, many breeders are breeding for HUGE dogs when really they arent supposed to be all that big and end up with joint/hip issues.

clm
March 27th, 2010, 09:43 PM
I've known female mals just as intollerant of other dogs as males. Like any breed, they all have issues so you need to choose your breeder with extreme care a not rush into anything when it comes to any breed of dog. If you decide to get a mix or purebred that is in foster care, you have the benefit of knowing how the dog is with other dogs from the foster mom. That's a win, win as far as I'm concerned.

clm

happycats
March 27th, 2010, 09:57 PM
we're gonna give the mastiff away to a relative but keep the boxer. Why would another dog be a problem with a Mal?

So your getting rid of the mastiff? So what happens when you get one of the dogs we've mentioned,and you decide to move on.....to civilization, will you get rid of it too ?

clm
March 27th, 2010, 10:32 PM
So your getting rid of the mastiff? So what happens when you get one of the dogs we've mentioned,and you decide to move on.....to civilization, will you get rid of it too ?

Oh, I didn't see that. Why are you getting rid of the mastiff? Pets are for life as far as I'm concerned. If you're not prepared to love and care for an animal for the whole of it's existance, then don't get one. Just my :2cents:

clm

Tundra_Queen
March 27th, 2010, 11:06 PM
I thought I had read that Great Pyrs are very territorial and don't really get along with other dogs.

Frenchy could tell u more about that.

Mia101
March 28th, 2010, 01:48 AM
Why does everyone have to be so judgmental on these sites?

Y'all didn't even give her a chance to ask why the Mastiff is with a relative.

If my dog were to become unhappy with my lifestyle, I've love her enough to let her live with my mom or another that would give her better.

Longblades
March 28th, 2010, 08:58 AM
Thanks for the extra info. I didn't realize you already had two dogs. No comments from me on working dogs, know nothing about that.

I'm really curious about your living arrangements though. Care to share more about this endeavour? School project? TV show replicating the life of pioneers? :D I know when we canoe trip having a short trip to get water is a prime consideration so 5 or 6 acres away sounds like a real hardship. Acres? Are you in farming country? Acres just sounds like a strange way to express distance.

The whole thing sounds very interesting. Every canoe trip I've been on I hated to come back to civilization and wanted to stay out forever. But then the practicalities would assail me, like, how would I renew my library books? :D

Telamonian
March 28th, 2010, 10:04 AM
I just wanted an opinion not to be judged by the decisions we're making. Like i said before, my best friend owns both the mastiff and the boxer. From what i know, the Mastiff was adopted from a violent owner that mistreated/abused the dog. He's become really shy/scared (around me) and plus having him out here is not helping. he's been sleeping, hiding in dark places where no one really goes, whines at night. We're scared that if he becomes sick or something happens to him we wont get help fast enough, so we're giving him to relatives that we know can take care of him. He'll be happy there. he loves kids and they have 2 little boys and a girl. Now that we're down a helping paw, i decided that i want to get a dog of my own. i've never really owned a dog so i just needed help deciding, is all.

Telamonian
March 28th, 2010, 10:20 AM
I'm really curious about your living arrangements though. Care to share more about this endeavour? School project? TV show replicating the life of pioneers? :D I know when we canoe trip having a short trip to get water is a prime consideration so 5 or 6 acres away sounds like a real hardship. Acres? Are you in farming country? Acres just sounds like a strange way to express distance.

The whole thing sounds very interesting. Every canoe trip I've been on I hated to come back to civilization and wanted to stay out forever. But then the practicalities would assail me, like, how would I renew my library books? :D

My bestfriend's parents recently passed away. They had some land in Nova Scotia which he inherited. It a small place, really great. we're working on making it self-sufficient. solar panels, wind turbines, hydroPump(for water) etc...
Once i found out he had this place, i kinda convinced him would a great idea to just live there. I love the outdoors. Its like camping but without the tents and the going back home part :p

clm
March 28th, 2010, 10:54 AM
Why does everyone have to be so judgmental on these sites?

Y'all didn't even give her a chance to ask why the Mastiff is with a relative.

If my dog were to become unhappy with my lifestyle, I've love her enough to let her live with my mom or another that would give her better.

We're intitled to our opinions too. If that comes across as being judgmental then so be it. :shrug: I adjust my lifestye for my pets, I don't give them away because they all of a sudden don't fit in.

clm

Frenchy
March 28th, 2010, 11:48 AM
I adjust my lifestye for my pets, I don't give them away because they all of a sudden don't fit in.

clm

Yep , same here :) A pet is for life.

I don't know what to tell you Telamonian .... may I ask how many years you want to live there ? What if you do get that "outside" dog and it doesn't work well in summer because it's too hot. What if you decide to move after a year or 2 , what if the dog gets hip displesia and other health problems .... what then ? You say you need to move water and tree branches ... wouldn't it be better to get a 4 wheelers ? :shrug:

as for Pyrenees , I do own one. It's not a breed for everyone. You need to get one as a puppy from a good breeder so you can socialize it , if you want a good dog. But living where you live , you won't be able to socialize it. :shrug: If you get an adult one , it might not like your dog. Pyrenees are very territorial , and also very large , they can do great arm to another dog. Also the cost of feeding , vet , have you considered it ? Mine is 160 lbs , do you know how much kibble they eat ? A LOT ! Also , pyrenees are working dogs but mostly to keep an eye on sheeps and livestock. Not sure they would be good to pull :shrug:

one more thing , what are the dogs available in your area ? It's nice to research your breeds but , do they have those types of dogs there ?

catlover2
March 28th, 2010, 11:55 AM
A couple of other breeds you might consider is a Bouvier (good for pulling and guarding)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouvier_des_Flandres

and perhaps a Keeshond, if you prefer a smaller breed:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keeshond

happycats
March 28th, 2010, 11:58 AM
We're intitled to our opinions too. If that comes across as being judgmental then so be it. :shrug: I adjust my lifestye for my pets, I don't give them away because they all of a sudden don't fit in.

clm


:thumbs up


Yup, pets for life :) and yup that's my "opinion" :D

Bina
March 28th, 2010, 05:06 PM
The Bouvier des Flandres is a fantastic breed, but they require lots of brushing and clipping to keep the coat decent.
My friend has Newfoundland dogs which are bred for this climate and work well. She does carting and skijoring with hers.
We have 5 acres and a large strong dog could easily pull a light cart around here.
I refuse to buy a noisy ATV. ;)

Telamonian
March 28th, 2010, 05:16 PM
i respect your opinions and i'm glad to see there also some suggestions. But do you seriously think i'll get a dog and than get rid of it when i'm done needing it lol. you cant jump to conclusions like that, thats not an opinion. And what kinda of a person would i be to let a small dog pull loads of branchs by its self. All I said is there are two of us,and at times we will need the help with some heavy work and i need a dog that can help out when we need the help. Trees fall all of the time out here and sometimes block essential routes, we need to clear them. But thanks for the help anyways...

shane2010
March 28th, 2010, 05:57 PM
Hi there, I own a couple of indoor dogs called dachshunds. I know when I went out to a farm a neighbor had a Border Collie. They are the most intelligent dog in the world. The owner was using it to heard cattle and it wasnt properly trained it just knew what its master wanted. I tossed a tennis ball for it and it was so excited it cuaght the ball brought it back to me and dropped it at my feet. I just met the dog and I fell in love with it. They love the wide open space and love interacting with humans. I hope this helps in your decision.

Regards,

Shane

14+kitties
March 29th, 2010, 12:14 AM
If you want an animal to help move water and heavy things like fallen branches and things then why not get a horse or a donkey. :confused:

Goldfields
March 29th, 2010, 12:47 AM
14+kitties, you took the words right out of my mouth, I thought why not buy a draft horse? This is just MHO but I'd never buy a dog to do the heavy work on this place. I think some people expect altogether too much from their dogs.

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 02:37 AM
We're intitled to our opinions too. If that comes across as being judgmental then so be it. :shrug: I adjust my lifestye for my pets, I don't give them away because they all of a sudden don't fit in.

clm

would you move cross-country for your pet?

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 02:42 AM
:thumbs up


Yup, pets for life :) and yup that's my "opinion" :D

Good for you, but the OP didn't ask for your opinion on the mastiff,and you don't know enough to judge. The dog was unhappy - does it make more sense for the human to move or for the dog to go to a happy home?

Yes, pets are for life but there are extenuating circumstances.

As I mentioned, I have a dog, and I did the research that said she'd be fine in apt.living. What if she turned out not to be? I can't afford a house, so what would be better - her being unhappy here or going to my mom's who has a big back yard?

I'd sacrifice my desire to have her with me for her happiness.

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 02:44 AM
i respect your opinions and i'm glad to see there also some suggestions. But do you seriously think i'll get a dog and than get rid of it when i'm done needing it lol. you cant jump to conclusions like that, thats not an opinion. And what kinda of a person would i be to let a small dog pull loads of branchs by its self. All I said is there are two of us,and at times we will need the help with some heavy work and i need a dog that can help out when we need the help. Trees fall all of the time out here and sometimes block essential routes, we need to clear them. But thanks for the help anyways...

I agree that dogs are not suited for this kind of work. You need a horse or a donkey as mentioned by others.

mummummum
March 29th, 2010, 06:02 AM
we're gonna give the mastiff away to a relative but keep the boxer. Why would another dog be a problem with a Mal?

Perhaps you should "live the life" first.

Going off-grid is a very harsh, very difficult way to live. It's not for everyone and may not be for you. There is a HUGE learning curve in the first few years and I assure you it is NOT camping. :laughing: And, I promise you that you will surprize even yourself with your creative use of new curse words over the course of your first winter! :D:evil:.

Maybe it would be smarter to get a little living down before you add responsibility for ANOTHER life into the mix.

Nothing wrong with dreaming though! Just don't forget mutts and adoption as a viable option at the end of the day.

happycats
March 29th, 2010, 07:10 AM
Good for you, but the OP didn't ask for your opinion on the mastiff,and you don't know enough to judge. The dog was unhappy - does it make more sense for the human to move or for the dog to go to a happy home?

Yes, pets are for life but there are extenuating circumstances.

As I mentioned, I have a dog, and I did the research that said she'd be fine in apt.living. What if she turned out not to be? I can't afford a house, so what would be better - her being unhappy here or going to my mom's who has a big back yard?

I'd sacrifice my desire to have her with me for her happiness.

And if the OP didn't post I wouldn't have given an opinion :shrug: Isn't that what this board is for :shrug:

And who made you the "judgement" police. I guess since you got rid of a dog, you can relate to the OP, and those of us who keep our pets for life can also relate!

Love4himies
March 29th, 2010, 08:02 AM
Perhaps you should "live the life" first.

Going off-grid is a very harsh, very difficult way to live. It's not for everyone and may not be for you. There is a HUGE learning curve in the first few years and I assure you it is NOT camping. :laughing: And, I promise you that you will surprize even yourself with your creative use of new curse words over the course of your first winter! :D:evil:.

Maybe it would be smarter to get a little living down before you add responsibility for ANOTHER life into the mix.

Nothing wrong with dreaming though! Just don't forget mutts and adoption as a viable option at the end of the day.


Excellent, excellent advice :thumbs up. I live out in the country, but not as rural as you are planning and it is a huge amount of work for us.

As for moving fallen trees, you will need a donkey or horse, not a dog, but if you can't keep one, then I highly suggest an ATV with chains.

clm
March 29th, 2010, 08:19 AM
would you move cross-country for your pet?

Now just why one earth would one have to move cross country for their pet. Please, if you're going to make a point, make it a valid one.

clm

clm
March 29th, 2010, 08:24 AM
Good for you, but the OP didn't ask for your opinion on the mastiff,and you don't know enough to judge. The dog was unhappy - does it make more sense for the human to move or for the dog to go to a happy home?

Yes, pets are for life but there are extenuating circumstances.

As I mentioned, I have a dog, and I did the research that said she'd be fine in apt.living. What if she turned out not to be? I can't afford a house, so what would be better - her being unhappy here or going to my mom's who has a big back yard?

I'd sacrifice my desire to have her with me for her happiness.

You can rent apartments in houses with backyards if you require them and lots of people do to make their pets happy. She says the Mastiff isn't happy, well you take the time to get the dog to adjust to it's new surroundings. Takes a lot of love, understanding and working with the dog. You don't just say he's not happy and ship him off somewhere else.
You adjust your lifestyle and situation to make your pets happy. So if you had a child and it wasn't happy where you were living, would you send it off to mom too. :laughing: :shrug:

clm

happycats
March 29th, 2010, 10:17 AM
So if you had a child and it wasn't happy where you were living, would you send it off to mom too. :laughing: :shrug:

clm


:laugh:
Hey there are days I'd love to send my son off to Moms :rolleyes: But like my pets, he's for life as well (or at least until he's got a good job and moves out) :D

I don't know, I've never known a dog to be "unhappy" unless the owner dies or gives it away :shrug: If my dog gets "down" (if you can even call it that) , I know I must be doing something wrong, and it's usually lack of excercise (walks)

14+kitties
March 29th, 2010, 12:57 PM
See Telamonian, this is a great forum!! We have solved all your problems for you! :thumbs up
You can find yourself a draft horse to do all your heavy lifting and moving and you can work on solving the mastiff's fear issues (seeing as it's you that he is focusing on being afeared of) in your spare time. That, to me at least, seems the most logical thing to do. That way when you get tired of "living off the grid" you can find a new home for the horse and you will have a marvelous loving dog in the mastiff. :thumbs up

Curiousity because I at one point in my life had a chance of doing what you are now doing, it must be costing an arm and a leg for solar panels and a wind turbine. I know we vetoed the idea here because of cost considerations. And the costs to ship to you! :eek:

Love4himies
March 29th, 2010, 01:01 PM
See Telamonian, this is a great forum!! We have solved all your problems for you! :thumbs up
You can find yourself a draft horse to do all your heavy lifting and moving and you can work on solving the mastiff's fear issues (seeing as it's you that he is focusing on being afeared of) in your spare time. That, to me at least, seems the most logical thing to do. That way when you get tired of "living off the grid" you can find a new home for the horse and you will have a marvelous loving dog in the mastiff. :thumbs up

Curiousity because I at one point in my life had a chance of doing what you are now doing, it must be costing an arm and a leg for solar panels and a wind turbine. I know we vetoed the idea here because of cost considerations. And the costs to ship to you! :eek:

:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing: Way to problem solve :thumbs up

BenMax
March 29th, 2010, 01:03 PM
I am a little sensitive about the horse or donkey suggestions as I don't believe in working any animal in this day and age for such tasks. Technology has evolved.

Better yet - what great exercise to use ourselves as work horses to take care of the land. Make a harness, fill the barrel and move the follage....then truck up that hill. Great fun.

14+kitties
March 29th, 2010, 01:16 PM
I am a little sensitive about the horse or donkey suggestions as I don't believe in working any animal in this day and age for such tasks. Technology has evolved.

Better yet - what great exercise to use ourselves as work horses to take care of the land. Make a harness, fill the barrel and move the follage....then truck up that hill. Great fun.

In all due respect BM there are still many places in the world using donkeys, mules, elephants, etc. for moving large items. Some would argue that is what they were built for. Technology forgot to evolve in some of those places. :rolleyes:
Seeing as it sounds like the area in NS where these two pioneers have decided to stake their claim is in a slightly isolated area I would much rather see a donkey or mule being used for this work than a dog who does not have the muscle mass or weight behind them.
This may all be a mote point anyway. We may have scared him/her away with our zealousness. :o

BenMax
March 29th, 2010, 01:47 PM
In all due respect BM there are still many places in the world using donkeys, mules, elephants, etc. for moving large items. Some would argue that is what they were built for. Technology forgot to evolve in some of those places. :rolleyes:
Seeing as it sounds like the area in NS where these two pioneers have decided to stake their claim is in a slightly isolated area I would much rather see a donkey or mule being used for this work than a dog who does not have the muscle mass or weight behind them.
This may all be a mote point anyway. We may have scared him/her away with our zealousness. :o

I hear you 14+K.

Just rubs me the wrong way.:shrug: But it's just my opinion...and who am I. Others may not agree, be offended, feel bad..whatever. Just think it's sad to think a dog could be used in this manner.

shirley1011
March 29th, 2010, 02:04 PM
I agree BM.....

sugarcatmom
March 29th, 2010, 02:18 PM
he's been sleeping, hiding in dark places where no one really goes, whines at night.

Has he seen a vet recently? There could be something medically wrong with him.

happycats
March 29th, 2010, 02:43 PM
I agree BM.....

Me too BM :D I just want to "enjoy" animals and not work them :) exercise yes, work no.

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 03:11 PM
And if the OP didn't post I wouldn't have given an opinion :shrug: Isn't that what this board is for :shrug:

And who made you the "judgement" police. I guess since you got rid of a dog, you can relate to the OP, and those of us who keep our pets for life can also relate!


I never got rid of a pet. I posted a hypothetical.

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 03:20 PM
Has he seen a vet recently? There could be something medically wrong with him.

yes - that's always the first thing to check, imo.

Melinda
March 29th, 2010, 03:21 PM
isn't rehoming a horse and rehoming a dog the same thing? I agree not all dogs are suited to outside work, but huskies would be good at pulling, would they not? winches (sp?) move branches really well, at our farm we had no atv etc (many moons ago) we would move the fallen tree's with winches , then cut them up to 3 foot lengths depending on the girth and then would haul em home on a small wheeled wagon or in the winter a sleigh where we'd then chop them for firewood, we also had no indoor running water except for a sink in the kitchen, heated the house with wood but we did have electricity *L*. it was a hard life, one I would not want to repeat. but with todays solar panels etc, I think I'd try it again ...maybe...:crazy:

Love4himies
March 29th, 2010, 03:33 PM
isn't rehoming a horse and rehoming a dog the same thing? I agree not all dogs are suited to outside work, but huskies would be good at pulling, would they not? winches (sp?) move branches really well, at our farm we had no atv etc (many moons ago) we would move the fallen tree's with winches , then cut them up to 3 foot lengths depending on the girth and then would haul em home on a small wheeled wagon or in the winter a sleigh where we'd then chop them for firewood, we also had no indoor running water except for a sink in the kitchen, heated the house with wood but we did have electricity *L*. it was a hard life, one I would not want to repeat. but with todays solar panels etc, I think I'd try it again ...maybe...:crazy:

:eek::eek: :grouphug::grouphug:

I agree, as long as the work is not stressing the dog, or not too much in the summer months when they are hot. It really wouldn't be that much different then pulling supplies with a sled :shrug:. What I would worry about is the dog pulling too much weight just to please their owners, it is not like they can speak and water and tree trunks can get very heavy:(.

14+kitties
March 29th, 2010, 03:33 PM
isn't rehoming a horse and rehoming a dog the same thing?

Not if you talk to a lot of horse people. I recently read a book written by a woman who spent a lot of time training for dressage. She said selling horses happened constantly. They are always looking for a better horse than the one they have. I think it was also said on here by one of our horse peeps that selling horses is pretty commonplace. Horses just are not treated the same as dogs.

I never said I agreed with it. Was just looking for a solution to his/her problem.

Oh, and I too went through the "growing up with few comforts". I can remember the coal oil lamps used for light, the woodstove for cooking and heat, and the outhouses. Pheweeee!!!!

Melinda
March 29th, 2010, 03:38 PM
my horse was like a dog, loose in the yard, he'd walk into the damn kitchen by pulling open the screen door *L*, he would follows us to the bus stop at the end of the driveway and then go back to the house when we left, when the grandparents passed on and the farm was sold, he moved next door to the farm there and we had to go see him weekly because he'd get depressed....he lived to be 32....I still miss him.

and as for outhouses...........we won't go there *LOL*.......*grumble grumble grumble damnspiders*....................

Melinda
March 29th, 2010, 03:40 PM
:eek::eek: :grouphug::grouphug:

I agree, as long as the work is not stressing the dog, or not too much in the summer months when they are hot. It really wouldn't be that much different then pulling supplies with a sled :shrug:. What I would worry about is the dog pulling too much weight just to please their owners, it is not like they can speak and water and tree trunks can get very heavy:(.

exactly, know your dogs limit, our husky use to pull our kids on a sled in the yard and a red wagon in the summer, but never over 70 pounds *winter time*

Marcha
March 29th, 2010, 03:42 PM
Just to add something to the mix -

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?_encoding=UTF8&sort=relevancerank&search-alias=books&field-author=Chris%20Czajkowski

A woman who spent the last 15 years living alone with her dog in the BC wilderness. She built her own cabins and did a lot of trekking, with the physical help of her dog. I'm not saying it's 'right' or 'wrong', but it's interesting reading, specially for dog owners. One of the books she wrote is about her dog, from Chris's idea of what could have been her dog Lonesome's perspective.

happycats
March 29th, 2010, 06:28 PM
Not if you talk to a lot of horse people. I recently read a book written by a woman who spent a lot of time training for dressage. She said selling horses happened constantly. They are always looking for a better horse than the one they have. I think it was also said on here by one of our horse peeps that selling horses is pretty commonplace. Horses just are not treated the same as dogs.

I never said I agreed with it. Was just looking for a solution to his/her problem.

Oh, and I too went through the "growing up with few comforts". I can remember the coal oil lamps used for light, the woodstove for cooking and heat, and the outhouses. Pheweeee!!!!

Don't people get attached to their horses? I know I would,and wouldn't be albe to sell or give it away :shrug: I guess I'm not a horse peep, just an animal lover peep :D

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 06:40 PM
You can rent apartments in houses with backyards if you require them and lots of people do to make their pets happy. She says the Mastiff isn't happy, well you take the time to get the dog to adjust to it's new surroundings. Takes a lot of love, understanding and working with the dog. You don't just say he's not happy and ship him off somewhere else.
You adjust your lifestyle and situation to make your pets happy. So if you had a child and it wasn't happy where you were living, would you send it off to mom too. :laughing: :shrug:

clm

I don't rent. I have a mortgage. With the housing market as it is, I could not sell it for what I owe.

I don't have 10K to get out of it and move anywhere, or I already would have to get a yard.

Goldfields
March 29th, 2010, 06:40 PM
Better yet - what great exercise to use ourselves as work horses to take care of the land. Make a harness, fill the barrel and move the follage....then truck up that hill. Great fun.

I agree with that. Hasn't anyone asked themselves, wouldn't I be stronger than either of those dogs? But there again, Benmax, a draft horse would make very easy work of something I'd find impossible. :D

mummummum
March 29th, 2010, 06:41 PM
:offtopic::sorry: The Queen of Off-Topic here...:D

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 06:45 PM
my horse was like a dog, loose in the yard, he'd walk into the damn kitchen by pulling open the screen door *L*, he would follows us to the bus stop at the end of the driveway and then go back to the house when we left, when the grandparents passed on and the farm was sold, he moved next door to the farm there and we had to go see him weekly because he'd get depressed....he lived to be 32....I still miss him.

and as for outhouses...........we won't go there *LOL*.......*grumble grumble grumble damnspiders*....................

Mine died of depression. When his horse lot closed, where he had 14 mates, my father put him out somewhere alone until he fenced his new house. I still hold a grudge that he never built that fence.

20 yrs.later he built one for my sisters horses, but he won't keep dogs fenced so they don't get lost/run over/attacked by the pits up the road.

Argh!

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 06:52 PM
I don't think there is anything wrong with working dogs - in fact some breeds NEED a job.

I would only say to do a lot of research and make sure of what is appropriate and yeah, if it's built for winter do not work it in the summer. Rotate in summer dogs.

Mine is mostly Akita and it would be cruel to even walk her too long in the summer. She LIVES to walk, but gets overheated very quickly May-September.

For this particular poster, the work sounds to me like too much for a dog, but I really don't know that for sure - not my area of knowledge.

Since most people here have pets-as-family-members, I doubt there will be much we can contribute in terms of specifics.

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 07:39 PM
I agree with that. Hasn't anyone asked themselves, wouldn't I be stronger than either of those dogs? But there again, Benmax, a draft horse would make very easy work of something I'd find impossible. :D

My dog is stronger than me. Only apparatus allowed me to control her, and now only the desire to obey keeps her from walking me, etc.

Also, I assume the human is working too.The OP says she wants animal assistance, not to work it to death while she rides along.

Goldfields
March 29th, 2010, 08:38 PM
Mia101, it was man who built the pyramids. :D We're pretty strong really. I've had a woman comment, after only holding my male ACD at ringside for me , on how strong he is, :laughing: , but even when my bitches have been in a fighting frenzy, wanting to kill each other, hubby and I have had no trouble separating them. I worked fulltime with horses when I was young so know how strong I was then, and how strong I still am, regardless that I'm no spring chicken and have a number of health problems. I could not see myself ever making a dog work hard to make life easier for myself. I do see sense in using dogs for light work , as trackers, seeing eye or hearing dogs, and other types of aide work, customs work etc. but if the OP mentions exhausting daily work and the possibility that the mastiff is fatigued, I still feel wouldn't it be best to upgrade to a 'beast of burden', a horse?

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 08:51 PM
I totally agree with switching to a horse. And not giving a dog too much work. But some say they shouldn't work at all, and I don't agree with that.

Mine would love a job. Obedience and agility have to suffice. No bears to hunt here, and I don't like her killing possums :(

Goldfields
March 29th, 2010, 09:03 PM
What breed is she?Something big enough to hunt bears?? Can't guess. :shrug:

happycats
March 29th, 2010, 09:05 PM
What breed is she?Something big enough to hunt bears?? Can't guess. :shrug:

I believe she said part Akita, and they are Japanese , bred to fight and hunt bear ( I believe the Asian bears are somewhat smaller then ours) I believe.

Mia101
March 29th, 2010, 09:42 PM
I didn't know they actually fought bears, wow. I thought they just assisted in hunting. Like more than tracking but less than physical contact. I'm pretty sure all my dog would do is bark at a bear while I dragged her away!:eek:

Goldfields
March 30th, 2010, 02:44 AM
Thanks, happycats, I was imagining it tackling a grizzly there for a minute. LOL.

happycats
March 30th, 2010, 07:21 AM
I didn't know they actually fought bears, wow. I thought they just assisted in hunting. Like more than tracking but less than physical contact. I'm pretty sure all my dog would do is bark at a bear while I dragged her away!:eek:

Akita's are a beautiful breed, but not for everyone.
here's some history on them;
http://www.moellgaard.dk/English/Dogs/Akitas/Akitas_and_GJDs.htm
not all agree on the history though;
http://www.arvonakitas.com/akita%20history.html

Choochi
March 30th, 2010, 01:12 PM
I know a huge Akita that now lives in Toronto. She was the runt of the litter (the breeder was going to put her down because she was deemed useless due to her small size). She came from Yukon from a line of dogs that were bred specifically for hunting bears. Apparently her father actually brought down a bear that attacked his owner, so these dogs are certainly capable of it.

kandy
March 30th, 2010, 03:09 PM
I don't really have anything against using dogs to pull a load, but I think it depends on the dog and the load. Newfs are certainly strong enough to pull a cart along with a few other breeds, and they would be able to withstand the winter weather. However, no matter which breed is being asked to perform a task, the dog has to be prepared to perform the task. When pulling some kind of a load, that means starting out slowly to get the dog used to pulling, and allowing time for the muscles to build up to being able to pull heavy loads. You can't just take a dog and hook a harness and a cart onto him and expect him to know what he's is supposed to be doing. And of course a growing pup should never be used in this type of work - it could put too much pressure on growing bones and create skeletal issues later on.

I would also suggest a vet visit for the Mastiff - if he's been pulling loads that he was not trained to pull and allowances for the proper muscle development given, it may have pulled some muscles or even torn tendons. The whining makes me think he might be in pain. Your thought that he is scared of you might be correct too - especially if something about you or your way of training him reminds him of the abusive home. Most dogs don't take well to negative reinforcement training, especially one that has been abused. If this is the case, and your living arrangement is permanent - then rehoming the dog is probably a good idea. Dogs need to be trained in such a way as to make them happy to do what you are asking, not because of their fear of punishment.

Melinda
March 30th, 2010, 03:14 PM
very well put Kandy

Telamonian
March 30th, 2010, 04:12 PM
Okay here we go, lemme explain my self. i can kinda understand the confusion. when i say pulling tree i didnt mean chaining a 500lb tree to the back of a dog and whip it till it started to move the tree. Just because we've chosen a lifestyle thats out of the norm doesnt mean we're savages :p

a few days ago, a tree collapsed onto the road. This was a really great oppertunity for us. it was great fired wood it would keep us warm for a long time. like i said, we're not savages, we think of easier solutions. we had a small chain saw back at the cottage. we cut it up into reasonable pieces and we worked on moving it back to the cottage :) Both Dogs helped us move. Even the Mastiff helped, being friggin huge and all. He's not sick or anything. i just think he misses being with our relatives' kids. The kids spent much of their time at our old house with him. Always play and pet him, they would even take turns getting on him, we'd always yell at them but bubba didnt seem to mind at all. Even tho we dont want to get rid of him, but we see it as it would be the best for him and the kids. His previous owner abused him far enough, so we dont wanna do the say even if its only fetching water from the well or a river down the road :p I understand what your all saying, if we can get rid of him that fast than we never really loved him but thats not true, we'll truely miss him our boxer (rocky) will miss him dearly. both of them are inseparable. Anyways, i just thought i need to further explain myself, so you guys didnt think that we're animal abusers or we're expecting to much of our pets. But the way i see it, If my pet and I are working together as one for a common goal, We'd only get that much more attached to one another. If i require him for my survival, and he requires me our bonds will be stronger than ever. Thanks for understand. Bye :D

erykah1310
April 4th, 2010, 12:58 AM
I'm sorta going to go off topic here a bit
In one breath members here are so concerned about the working dog having vet care in the event of illness and seeing as this is such a desolate area by the sounds of it some one recommends a horse??? they too need vet care and some may need a considerable amount of it. How does one get a farrier there to keep up with hoof trimming every 6 weeks? Its not like grey roots needing a dye job here but properly trimmed and angled hooves on a horse is something that can NOT be left.
In the horse world yes many of them are baught and sold. Sure everyone wants to keep their pets for ever BUT, in reality when you have a bomb proof horse that is push button for riding but you aspire to compete in level 3 dressage or something, the beginner horse is not the one that is going to take you there. That bomb proof horse that may be 20 ish years old would be more suitable for someone who is just starting out. So you sell it and purchase the one that is where you are for riding. Thats just one example, other examples could be the lack of bond between you and a horse you have. Me and Beauty for example, we never bonded, we were never going to go anywhere together so I sold her, her new owner and her have bonded like me and Fe are. Horses are NOT cheap animals to share your life with and hanging on to one just because dog people say its the right thing to do makes no sense.
horses like dogs can be sold on contract ( as beauty was) and the same rules apply. If her new owner can no longer keep her I buy her back, no questions asked, I loved that horse enough to let her go and at any point in her life would take her back again to ensure she found another person like her new owner to bond with.

Back on topic though.
A work horse LOVES to pull, they are bred for it, like a border collie to herding, a draft is to driving. It is in NO way cruel to work them. It is however more cruel IMO to deny them of what they are BRED to do.
Forcing an animal who loves to work to be a couch or paddock potatoe is IMHO more cruel.
I have no advice in bred suggestions to the OP, but for anyone to even be hazarding guesses on what you should get truely depends more on YOUR ability as a dog owner, what you expect out of your dog besides pulling branches and more for what you would be looking for as a companion FIRST.
Even animals who are bred for work need training, love, affection and guidance.

Goldfields
April 4th, 2010, 12:52 PM
I think I could have said get an elephant or a yak instead of a horse, it just would not happen. :D If they are making a dog do work that I feel they could do themselves, do you think I believe they would want to look after a horse?

I have had a lifelong love of horses but do not believe they love to work at all . They are a grazing animal basically, just like sheep and cattle. Hackneys are bred solely to drive? We had a beauty, but he would swim a big irrigation channel in his paddock to avoid being caught and worked, and he was always treated kindly and well looked after. The clydesdales at a local stud, in big paddocks with good feed and water, and their mates for company, are going to be unhappy because people aren't making them work? I don't think so somehow.

erykah1310
April 4th, 2010, 06:00 PM
I have never had a problem getting the horses to work, they come up to the gate when I call them and are more than willing to do some stuff. Fe is more than willing to leave her buddies and spends some time with me. Working a working animal properly is not cruel no matter how you look at it, I'm sorry.

Goldfields
April 4th, 2010, 08:58 PM
I did not say working them was cruel, but you said 'Forcing an animal who loves to work to be a couch or paddock potatoe is IMHO more cruel.' Really? Forcing them to live a natural horse's life is cruel? I believe they are happier rolling in the grass, racing around with the others when they feel like it, and simply doing what horses do, eating and sleeping, and rearing foals. They look very contented to my eyes. Anything other than that is what WE want them to do for us and we are very lucky they are so co-operative. Neither way of life is cruel.

trueworld
April 4th, 2010, 11:24 PM
Hey everyone

I was wondering if anyone can tell me their opinions on which type of dog would be suitable to outdoor living. A friend and I decided to live at cottage up in Nova Scotia, Canada. Kinda of an off-the-grid living style. Now my best friend has had many dogs before all bigger and stronger dogs (Boxer, and Mastiffs) which might be suitable for the harsh winters and exhausting daily works. But i've never really had pets, only when i was very young so no real experience.
If anyone can list some great outdoor dogs that can tolerate this type of life style i would be greatful. And also i would like a companion dog for those lonely times in the woods..haha
A really active, loyal dog is the Rhodesian Ridgeback. They are able to walk through tough areas without hurting a paw. If trained well enough they are able to be off the leash in exciting wild places without wandering off. Google them and go to all the websites you can about these amazing dogs! :dog: