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Forest Clean Up

luckypenny
March 16th, 2010, 08:01 PM
Don't know what else I could call it :o. I took a long walk through the patch of forest/woods out behind our house this morning. It's so full of dead, rotting trees. We figure it could be a result of the '98 ice storm :shrug:. Is it a good idea to clean it up some? I wouldn't want to overdo it as I know that lots of yummy insects can be found by birds and other animals in dead logs.

As it is, we do have to clear out the dead trees bordering the backyard because I don't want any falling over and damaging the fencing. I was just wondering if it would help the smaller trees to grow if we cleaned up the rotting ones deeper in the forest :shrug:.

Here are a couple of pics to show what I'm talking about.

luckypenny
March 16th, 2010, 08:09 PM
Then there are dead trees like this one that has obviously been used by Woodpeckers. It's huge, very dry, and the base of it looks like it's rotting. You can see the chips on the ground by the base of it and you can also see where it's been pecked near the bottom too. I'd hate for it to fall and hurt someone but I wouldn't want to take away a food source either.

hazelrunpack
March 16th, 2010, 08:38 PM
Unless it will damage something (like the fence for a big if) on our property, we leave the dead trees up. They really are beneficial to the wildlife. The slash on the ground will eventually rot and add good nutrients to the soil, too :thumbs up

The bent over ones...well, that's a harder call. If you walk through there a lot, you might want to have them removed just so you don't knock your noggin :D

If you do decide to take out some deadwood, you wouldn't try to do it yourselves, would you? :eek: Lumbering is a dangerous business. :o

luckypenny
March 16th, 2010, 08:57 PM
They really are beneficial to the wildlife.

That's what I figured but wasn't sure to what extent :o.

The bent over ones...well, that's a harder call. If you walk through there a lot, you might want to have them removed just so you don't knock your noggin :D

Those are the ones I don't mind at all :D. It makes walking rather adventurous :laughing:. I actually don't walk through there in the summer/fall as it's full of poison ivy. At this time of year though, I like to take the dogs (one at a time) every now and then straight through it until we reach the corn fields on the other side to play.

If you do decide to take out some deadwood, you wouldn't try to do it yourselves, would you? :eek: Lumbering is a dangerous business. :o

I was thinking more along the lines of dragging out the ones already on the ground but, if it's good for the soil, then we'll leave it there. That's why I started this thread, to get more info about stuff like that. So thank you :).

I was also worried about the little trees that look like they're getting choked out because there are so many large dead trees :o.

hazelrunpack
March 16th, 2010, 09:15 PM
It wouldn't hurt to remove some of the stuff on the ground--likely it would help the new trees a bit. But I think the biggest factor limiting new trees is likely to be shade--so it might be a lot of work for nothing. :shrug:

Don't know for sure, though. Not much of a forester...and the woods around here are off property and belong to the County, which frowns on people taking out the wood. :D

TeriM
March 16th, 2010, 11:36 PM
I can't tell what type of trees they are from the pics. If they are alder trees or other super fast growing type (cottonwood, aspen etc) then it would be fine to thin them out. We have alders on the bank behind us that we continuously thin out every year or so as they basically grow like weeds here and have very shallow root systems. They then get to tall and a good storm comes along and they fall over :shrug:.

growler~GateKeeper
March 17th, 2010, 01:04 AM
I think the new trees & plants actually feed off the dead & rotting trees, leaves etc. as well as the forest critters living in the larger trees & feeding off the bugs on/under them.

From Ohio State Uni Dead Trees as Resources for Forest Wildlife (http://ohioline.osu.edu/w-fact/0018.html)

Check with the municipality before doing anything as it might be illegal/needing a permit to remove trees dead or alive from the forest in your area :shrug:

Love4himies
March 17th, 2010, 06:46 AM
We have 65 acres of woods that border onto Parks Canada land and we asked the same question to the park warden and he stated the exact same thing as Hazel. Unless it is a danger to property, let nature take it's course and don't clean up the deadwood as many critters rely on that for habitat/food. ;)

hazelrunpack
March 17th, 2010, 09:02 AM
The only time I'd say to clean up is if there is an excess of wood on the ground that might be an additional fire hazard. If you're in a fire prone area, having a lot of fuel under the trees isn't a good idea. :o