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Anybody run?

Love4himies
February 2nd, 2010, 06:07 PM
Does anybody run, or have trained for a half marathon?

aslan
February 2nd, 2010, 06:10 PM
Bendyfoot does Love4..

Macomom
February 2nd, 2010, 06:13 PM
Bendy runs and sometimes, there isn't even anyone chasing her :D

bendyfoot
February 2nd, 2010, 06:22 PM
Yep, good memory guys, I did a half last May... I'm doing a 10 in 2 weeks in Ottawa (ran 12 on Sunday, so I'm alllll good :thumbs up) You going to do some running, L4?

bendyfoot
February 2nd, 2010, 06:22 PM
there isn't even anyone chasing her :D

Oh, but sometimes there IS!!! :eek::laughing:

Macomom
February 2nd, 2010, 06:24 PM
Oh, but sometimes there IS!!! :eek::laughing:


Bendddyyyy, I haven't done that in weeks

bendyfoot
February 2nd, 2010, 06:25 PM
I know :cry:

Love4himies
February 3rd, 2010, 06:53 AM
Bendy runs and sometimes, there isn't even anyone chasing her :D

:laughing::laughing::laughing: I was chewing on an apple and spit it out laughing when I read this.

Love4himies
February 3rd, 2010, 07:04 AM
Yep, good memory guys, I did a half last May... I'm doing a 10 in 2 weeks in Ottawa (ran 12 on Sunday, so I'm alllll good :thumbs up) You going to do some running, L4?

Yes, I actually started back in Nov, I know who the heck starts running outside in Nov :loser: :laughing:

I have very good cardio, I bike in the summer (40Kms daily) and use the eliptical in the winter. The problem I have is I HATE exercising inside, so I thought I could add running outside in the winter to add to my inside exercising regime.

So here is my problem:

Because I have very good cardio and fairly strong legs, it hasn't stopped me from doing the walk/run training. I started at 2KM back in Nov and now am doing 6KM Mon & Wed after work and 12KM on Saturday mornings. BUUUUUUUUT I am in constant pain :yell: :yell:. Last week I stopped running until my legs healed, ran Monday night and am in pain again :frustrated:.

Is this normal???? Do all runners endure this when they start, or am I doing something wrong? Is it my age (47) and it will take much longer for my tendons to get accustomed to high impact exercise? Is my body telling me that I am not made to be a runner and just stop now? :(

My goal is to run the Canada Army Run half marathon in Ottawa next Sept.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. :D

bendyfoot
February 3rd, 2010, 11:42 AM
Yes, I actually started back in Nov, I know who the heck starts running outside in Nov :loser: :laughing:

ME! :D It's actually a nice, cool time of year

I have very good cardio, I bike in the summer (40Kms daily) and use the eliptical in the winter. The problem I have is I HATE exercising inside, so I thought I could add running outside in the winter to add to my inside exercising regime.


Sadly, being super-cardio-fit in one type of activity can only partially help with running fitness...it's a whole other beast! But I totally understand your aversion to indoor exercise :yuck:

So here is my problem:

Because I have very good cardio and fairly strong legs, it hasn't stopped me from doing the walk/run training. I started at 2KM back in Nov and now am doing 6KM Mon & Wed after work and 12KM on Saturday mornings. BUUUUUUUUT I am in constant pain :yell: :yell:. Last week I stopped running until my legs healed, ran Monday night and am in pain again :frustrated:.

I'm assuming you graaaadually upped your runs from 2 to 6? Long runs as well? You should never add much more than 10% of distance every week when training for a long race, and when you're building your base (up to 8-10kms or so).

Is this normal???? Do all runners endure this when they start, or am I doing something wrong? Is it my age (47) and it will take much longer for my tendons to get accustomed to high impact exercise? Is my body telling me that I am not made to be a runner and just stop now? :(

Ok, so where is the pain? My first thought is "do you have proper footwear?" You absolutely cannot run in crosstrainers...it has to be running-specific shoes, fitted properly by someone who knows what they're doing, to make sure they're providing support and/or cusioning where you need it. My legs used to DIE until I got proper shoes, it makes a HUGE difference and helps prevent injury.

My goal is to run the Canada Army Run half marathon in Ottawa next Sept.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. :D

Some pain is to be expected, yes. But it should be muscle soreness, and mild tendon pain, not crippling. Once you've got a good base, your short runs should feel good, not sore-inducing. The long training runs will pretty much always make you sore. You're using the 10:1 run:walk program right now, you said? Good, this will help with preventing soreness/injury. It COULD be technique. Technique is a tricky thing, because everybody moves differently and has a unique natural "gait" but there are some things you could be doing (where you're planting your stride on your foot, where you're putting your centre of gravity etc) that could be causing undue strain.

I totally want to run that race too, I meant to last year but it just couldn't happen. :D

Love4himies
February 3rd, 2010, 12:41 PM
Yes I got fitted for running shoes at the Running Room by a very experienced person.. :thumbs up Love my Saucony's :D

Yes, the soreness is in my muscles and possibly my tendons, mostly in my calves and quads.

I think having good cardio can be one of my downsides because my heart didn't tell me to slow down when my legs did :o. In fact, my heart can keep on going after 12kms, even though my legs are about to fall off :yell:. Soooooooooooooooo, I guess I didn't do that 10% increase very well :o :


I started at 2km -1st week, 3km-2nd week, 4km 3rd week, then 5 Mon and Wed and 8 Sat for a couple of weeks, now to my 6km Mon & Wed, 12km Sat. I have to admit, I was striving for the cardio high afterwards and wasn't getting it after a short run :o.

bendyfoot
February 3rd, 2010, 07:57 PM
So it sounds like you're trying for too much too soon, really. I know what you mean, you don't get the same cardio "burn/buzz" necessarily, depending on the pace, but if you wear a calorimeter, you'll be amazed at what staying in a medium-effort zone will burn, it's craaaazy. I understand what you mean about cardio giving out before the legs, on some really long runs (like the 18 and 20 kms before the race), my lungs/heart could have gone for HOURS, but my legs were like :yell: But if you're in PAIN during a run, you're overdoing it already. There should be effort, especially near the end, but not pain.

Consider the different PURPOSES of your runs. The long run should be long and slooooow. Use your 10:1 here especially. Your pace will be around 30 sec-90sec/km slower than your normal steady pace. You'll barely breathe hard...the purpose of the long run is to acclimatize your muscles, joints and other tissue (think soles of your feet) to the distance. Your body will adapt, become more efficient at oxygenating these areas over the long term. It's really important to build this distance slowly...this is where a lot of injury will occur otherwise.

Your shorter runs can do two things: build strength, or build cardio endurance. For strength, try hills. Do a really easy 2-3 km warm up, find a nice steep long hill, run up it at a fast pace, then walk down. Repeat 2-8 times (again, adding reps over time). Do an easy cooldown run back home. This will build leg strength.

For cardio, do shorter runs at a faster pace, and also try some speedplay (might be better for the buzz)...basically interval training...short bursts of intense speed at maximum effort, with slower pace run between bursts.

For base-building, just run on your regular terrain, at a steady pace, and gradually increase the mileage to about 8-10 kms or so. Medium effort here too.

I understand the desire to add on as much mileage as possible, as quickly as possible, but long-distance running really is a sport where (in training, anyways), slow and steady wins the race.

Love4himies
February 4th, 2010, 07:00 AM
Thanks bendyfoot :grouphug:

I am not sure what you meant by 10:1 :confused:


I live on the perfect road for hill training, it is very hilly :thumbs up and for my long runs (this is the road I do my 6km run on), I run on the 1000 Island Parkway for my 12km run, which is somewhat flat.

So I should do each one of these every week? Monday, hills, Wednesday, cardio, Saturday long and slow. I also go to the gym Mon-Fri for eliptical/weights so that should take care of keeping my cardio up.

bendyfoot
February 4th, 2010, 07:36 AM
Run for 10 minutes, brisk walk for 1.

Check out this training program from the Running Room:

http://www.runningroom.com/hm/inside.php?id=3133

Love4himies
February 6th, 2010, 10:36 AM
I looked at their training program, but I just can't run everyday :o, my legs really need at least a day break between runs. :( , think it must be my age :o


I did 10.5km this morning at a good slow pace (est hr @ 140-150), approx 1.25hrs, and boy was it cold, well actually only my face was cold where the wind could get to it. My drink bottle froze up on me :yell: :frustrated:

Frenchy
February 6th, 2010, 10:40 AM
I did 10.5km this morning at a good slow pace (est hr @ 140-150), approx 1.25hrs,

:eek: good girl !!!! :thumbs up

Rick C
February 15th, 2010, 02:41 PM
Yes, I actually started back in Nov, I know who the heck starts running outside in Nov :loser: :laughing:

I have very good cardio, I bike in the summer (40Kms daily) and use the eliptical in the winter. The problem I have is I HATE exercising inside, so I thought I could add running outside in the winter to add to my inside exercising regime.

So here is my problem:

Because I have very good cardio and fairly strong legs, it hasn't stopped me from doing the walk/run training. I started at 2KM back in Nov and now am doing 6KM Mon & Wed after work and 12KM on Saturday mornings. BUUUUUUUUT I am in constant pain :yell: :yell:. Last week I stopped running until my legs healed, ran Monday night and am in pain again :frustrated:.

Is this normal???? Do all runners endure this when they start, or am I doing something wrong? Is it my age (47) and it will take much longer for my tendons to get accustomed to high impact exercise? Is my body telling me that I am not made to be a runner and just stop now? :(

My goal is to run the Canada Army Run half marathon in Ottawa next Sept.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. :D

Late to the party but a few things if you're interested . . . . .

Your injury/tightness issues actually sounds like you are not taking some time for some stretching AFTER your run.

You almost never feel like you have to stretch after a run but not doing so shows up the next day and the next with tight tendons and other aches. It will just kill you with pain eventually and you'll have a hard time extending to the longer distances.

Very important, critically so, to stretch AFTER your runs to set up the next run. You'd probably find you'd be able to run more frequently as well.

Second, instead of measuring your progress by distance you might do it by measuring time as well. "Today I'm running 90 minutes at a pace 30 seconds per kilometre slower than what I want to race at, so I can extend the distance." Or you might do some intervals at a fast pace.

Third, as the time and distances you're capable of get stretched out, you'll find pyschology will start to come into play . . . . . you'll probably have to toughen up considerably mentally to be running for an hour and a half and two hours at a time. I don't wear an I-Pod or anything so I've got to come up with lots to think about. Long-distance running goes a lot better if you're on auto-pilot and not thinking about your legs or form.

Fourth, as you're piling on the kilometres/miles, you'll be surprised to find you'll have to replace your footwear more often, maybe somewhere between 600 km to 800 km.

Fifth, I have some nice, deserted country highways I can run on, where oil is poured over gravel, creating a pavement like surface that's softer than normal highway pavement or the pavement on city pathways. I can also run down the middle of the road or on either side due to the lack of traffic, shifting the burden to different knees/ankles or evening it out to each side/hip. Most highways are slanted on the shoulders to drain excess water and it's something you should pay attention to lest you injure yourself.

Sixth, sign yourself up for some future 10km's and, if you can find them because they're rare, 16 km races, to give yourself some experience in a timed environment.

Seventh, enjoy yourself. Take it easy. Rest when you have to.

Eighth, a good book with training schedules for half marathons and full marathons and other tips is "Running, Start To Finish" by John Stanton (I think he's the Running Room guy).

Ninth, as you're stretching out into the hour area and beyond, you should be carrying liquids, water or water mixed with GU2O. Longer and you might want to carry some banana chips to munch on or whatever turns your crank, which all helps to prevent cramping and keep your energy level up.

I've run tons of half marathons (12 of them, I believe, in 2007-09, including Big Sur and Amsterdam and two marathons in the last year (the last two not as well as I wanted though. Still learning the marathon distance). I seem to be better at the half's because I'm only a halfways fanatic whereas a full marathon requires a little more dedication. But I'm going to keep plugging away at the full marathons until I get it right.

I love, love running in winter. Not all days because that would be crazy but running 32 km for three hours and ending up with icicles all over you and a frozen woohoo is a nice way to start a morning. Until the woohoo starts to thaw.

Good luck with your training and remember to stretch after your runs. Every single run. And that book is awesome for giving you an idea of training schedules.

Hope that helps.

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca

Love4himies
February 15th, 2010, 04:13 PM
Thank you, Rick, loved looking at your pics (all of them actually) of Hawaii :lovestruck:. A coworker of mine follows your blog, she is a trail/snowshoe runner (very serious), her DH does the 100 miler (and won) in Haliburton and she has completed (and won) the 3 day Rock and Ice competition in Yellowknife.

I think you are right on about the stretching. I wasn't doing it seriously when I first started and am now trying to do it and have found a difference, but am still in pain after a run, short or long. I find my pain is in different areas after each run. Maybe I am not doing enough :shrug:

I bought two new pairs of running shoes after being assessed at the Running Room which I alternate on my runs, I will change them often, my old bones just won't be able to handle too much impact :laughing:

GU2O (now GU Brew) is my SAVIOUR while biking, running and eliptical :thumbs up. I stop every 3km for a drink. Makes a huge difference in my energy levels.

I don't run with an Ipod or any other listening device. I live in the heart of the 1000 Islands and run along the Parkway. Although not as beautiful as Jasper or Banff, it comes close because of the water. The views I get on my run makes me forget any pain I am feeling.

I am still learning my pace and am trying to keep it down on my longer runs :o

I will pop into the Running Room, Kingston to look for John's book, thanks. Hopefully, he has stretching exercises, including ones that can be done outside in the snow, I have looked at some websites and they are done inside or outside on the grass :rolleyes:. What about us that run outside in the winter in Canada :laughing: Yup, I run even when it is -30, just have to add an additional layer ;)

Luvmypitgirls
February 15th, 2010, 04:44 PM
I run!
I run for food and beer every chance I get!;)

Love4himies
February 15th, 2010, 04:49 PM
I run!
I run for food and beer every chance I get!;)

:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing: OMG, good thing I wasn't taking a sip of my beer, I would have spit it out all over the computer, I laughed so hard when I read this.

cell
February 15th, 2010, 07:59 PM
I dont run, maybe I should, I find it hard on my legs when I try, I think it could be due to gait. I have read some interesting articles on bare-foot running that are interesting and might inspire me to actually give it another go. Very interesting the thought that the shoes we wear manipulate our gait as we run, making it more difficult on our bodies by training us towards heel-striking which is apperently the root cause of most running indjuries.

Love4himies
May 16th, 2010, 09:03 AM
Just an update on the pain in my legs. I had my coworker's husband who is an ultra marathon runner check out the shoes I was wearing and my running style. I had bought some Saucony Hurricanes online, thinking they were a neutral shoe :wall::loser:, but they were motion control, so I stopped wearing them and the pain went away :thumbs up :D . I now stick to my Saucony Progrids and Adistar Rides and there is zero pain.


Sooooooo it was the shoes, not my old age :laughing:.

Stacer
May 16th, 2010, 10:05 AM
I used to be a runner back in my teens, cross country team. I've gotten away from it.
My DH has recently really gotten into running, especially after he read the book 'Born to Run', now all he talks about is running, lol. He's signed up for a triathlon this summer up near Algonquin park.

I occasionally jog still, but I get shin splints so bad, and I was properly fitted with shoes at a running room. Admittedly I'm a bit heavier than I was a few years ago which is probably really causing my shin pain.

I think I might be inspired to start going at it again.

Love4himies
May 16th, 2010, 10:12 AM
I used to be a runner back in my teens, cross country team. I've gotten away from it.
My DH has recently really gotten into running, especially after he read the book 'Born to Run', now all he talks about is running, lol. He's signed up for a triathlon this summer up near Algonquin park.

I occasionally jog still, but I get shin splints so bad, and I was properly fitted with shoes at a running room. Admittedly I'm a bit heavier than I was a few years ago which is probably really causing my shin pain.

I think I might be inspired to start going at it again.

I am really more of a biker than runner, I just got into running because I couldn't stand working out inside and wanted to take up something that would carry me through the winter until I could bike again.

I admire those triathletes, I am such an uncoordinated swimmer (as in doggy paddle :laughing:) so I could never do one of them :p.