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Frustrated with dog - what would you do?

Myka
January 16th, 2010, 09:58 PM
Ok here's the situation. My SO bought a Chihuahua puppy in 2005 without putting much thought into it (I didn't know him then). When "Peewee" was still quite young SO started working out of town, and SO's mother started looking after Peewee. When SO was in town on days off he would sometimes take Peewee back for a few days at a time maybe a total of 30-40 days per year. Peewee really has no training. He is very insecure, will bite, hyper active, barks, whines, and every typical Chihuahua behavior there is (I'm not a fan of Chi's).

In March of this year SO starts working in town, so he takes Peewee back "permanently". I moved in with SO in March along with my senior dog. At the end of November 09 SO started working out of town again, and I took over care of Peewee. At the beginning of this year my dog passed on. Now I am left with Peewee the terrorist. He also pees and poos in our bedroom (always the same spot) as well as his kennel a few times per week.

I am trying to train Peewee, and get him under control and acting like a dog, but I don't like him. He's just not my type of dog. I've never been a fan of small dogs, and he's no exception. I don't think it's fair that I have to look after Peewee. Even if all my training time pays off and he ends up being a decent dog I will never have an attachment to him. My training is working, but not as well as it should since I do not like the dog. I don't think that's really all that fair to him either. I talked to my SO about it, and although he cares about Peewee a lot he says, "Well should I find a new home for him?" I would never want to cause a dog to be homeless, but I'm torn. Especially with the recent passing of my own dog (who was very well trained) I kind of resent Peewee.

What should I do? Any suggestions?

kungfuMao
January 16th, 2010, 10:33 PM
:sorry: to hear about your dog passing. It hasn't been very long either - the sadness must be acute :cry:

And since you asked what others would do in your shoes... I would try to live with Peewee and continue training him as you've been doing. I would have a hard time not comparing the two dogs, but I think that might be an important step. They're just soooo different! I'd continue this arrangement for a few months and see if anything changes. Perhaps Peewee will show significant improvement and endear himself to you. Perhaps your personal feelings towards him will change as time heals you. Perhaps nothing changes which would be a surer indicator then, that maybe it's time to find Peewee a home where he can be well matched with his family.

It is a hard decision... one that I would never relish making. I hope everything works out for you, and for Peewee. :pray:

cassiek
January 16th, 2010, 10:57 PM
I'm very, very sorry for the passing of your beloved girl. :candle: :angel:

This is a tough situation with no easy answer, and IMO a decision the two of you need to make together. Both you and your SO need to sit down and have a heart to heart. Have you made it clear to him that it is not fair to you (or PeeWee) that you are being left to take care of his dog? Does he know your feelings on this issue? While ultimately it is your SO's dog, you have become the primary caretaker and I agree with you, it really is not fair that you have ended up taking care of PeeWee.

IMHO, I believe when you get a dog you sign on for life and work through everything, thick and thin. Likely a lot of his issues have stemmed from missing out on the opportunity to have a pack leader from early on in life. Up until you came along, it sounds as if he didn't have a defined leader, and dogs need the stability of the "pack". Although he is 4-5 years old, I don't think he's a lost cause.

That being said, I can defaintly understand how you are frustrated and at your wits end!! :wall: If you do decide that PeeWee must go to another home, please make the potential owners aware of all his traits both good and bad, so they can adequately prepare to take him on and give him his forever home. In my experience, dogs that are continually passed from home to home to home that have issues tend to worsen from the lack of stability until eventually the animal is euthanized.

Is it possible for both of you (you and your SO) to work with a trainer with PeeWee? At this point, it may be your best option for PeeWee. Alot of trainers deal with these type of issues frequently and are a wonderful source of valuable information. Give PeeWee some credit too... he is picking up on your vibes/energy of "not being your type of dog" and is reacting to that. Just because he is not a breed you would pick for yourself, don't hold that against him. He didn't choose to end up in the situation he did, both of you actually have that in common... your kind of stuck with each other! I actually know many Chi's that when properly trained and socialized are wonderful little companions. Give him the benefit of the doubt... I wouldn't treat him any differently than any other breed of dog.

Your right, its not fair that you have to take care of PeeWee all by yourself. Your SO really needs to step on board if you guys decide to keep him as much as possible. And you bring up a valid point, your training is not working since you don't like him. Try to put aside the fact that you don't like the breed, size etc. and don't hold him up to your past dog - I find I sometimes catch myself doing this with my dogs and it's just not fair to them. Every dog has different qualities, both good and bad, and some are more challenging than others.

Best of luck with whatever you decide, and kudos to you for taking this on and having some successes with PeeWee! Keep us informed how things go!

happycats
January 16th, 2010, 11:21 PM
All I can say is I feel so sorry for Peewee, it must be so hard for him knowing he's disliked by his caregiver :(

I'm not trying to flame but, I'm an animal lover, and I can't imagine hating any dog, especially the dog of someone I care about :shrug:
Didn't you know SO had a dog when you met SO? Do you think it's fair to ask SO to dump the dog because you don't like it ?

I guess I just don't understand, although little dogs woud not be my choice of pets, if my SO had one before I met my SO I would learn to accept and like the dog because they are a package deal IMO.

Myka
January 17th, 2010, 12:26 AM
Happycats, I appreciate your post, but you have read some things a bit wrong. I didn't say I hate Peewee. I dislike him. If I hated him I don't think I would be letting him snooze on my lap like he is doing right now. I do not mistreat him in any way. Also, I did not ask SO to "dump the dog because don't like it." I told SO he needs to figure out how to deal with his dog, and [I]he asked me if he should find a new home for Peewee. I actually said I didn't want him to do that. When I get a dog I also believe it is a life-long commitment (I have owned both of my past dogs from puppyhood until passing on), but Peewee is not my dog. When I first met SO he wasn't looking after Peewee, his mom was (and SO actually thought his mom wanted to keep Peewee). Peewee would come over for visits for a couple days, but that's it. Peewee started living here full-time, but my SO looked after him, and I looked after my dog so I was able to accept Peewee. Now I have lost my dog, and SO spends more time working than at home. So please, read carefully before responding and use the head to critisize rather than the heart. You want him?? LOL

kungfumao and cassie, thanks for your messages. :) I appreciate your advice. Peewee has never had a pack leader, so he is insecure which makes him try to fill the leader's shoes. Now I'm calling his bluff, and he's rather upset about it. His little world has come crashing down on him - he is being asked to act like a dog instead of a spoiled little turd. *gasp* LOL

I have made some progress with Peewee in the last week. However, since I have lived with him full-time for awhile now I have done some minor basics with him (like sit/stay for feedings and playing ball), but SO has a rather large soft spot, and lets Peewee walk all over him (just like his mom and dad do with Peewee) so it has been difficult to do anything with P. Now that SO is gone (and my dog) I have been able to work with P one on one.

P is making progress in some areas, but others are very trying. Like his whining/barking. I haven't really been able to figure out a way to deal with that too well. I've tried some of Caesar Millan's techniques like the "touch" (which he doesn't respond to at all) and snapping finger with "shhht!" (which works as long as he isn't too wound up) as well as putting him on his side/back in a submissive position (there's a good way to get bit! not that it hurts). It will take him at least 8-10 minutes to submit in that position. Now I've moved on to quietly picking him up, and kenneling him with a blanket over top until he is quiet, then let him out again. This seems to be working a bit, but he's still peeing in his kennel (and the bedroom). I'm going to start using a belly wrap on him see if that helps. He's still on my lap right now, and I can smell the pee on him even though I bathed him yesterday along with washing all his bedding and sweaters. :frustrated:

Anyway I will keep it up, and see what happens in the next while. SO won't be home until Feb 4th anyway...

t.pettet
January 17th, 2010, 07:20 PM
I would contact a chi rescue, fully explain the situation and let them find him a loving home.

babydoll101
January 17th, 2010, 07:24 PM
I would contact a chi rescue, fully explain the situation and let them find him a loving home.

Yes, I was thinking something like that.

bendyfoot
January 17th, 2010, 07:40 PM
I think your little dog is probably one very confused and frustrated pup...probably even more frustrated than you are! He's got you telling him one one way to behave (and sometimes it's not always done in a very inspiring/happy tone!), his Daddy and his Grandparents telling him another way to behave... he probably doesn't know if he's coming or going!!!

The only way you're going to have any success with his training is to get your SO COMPLETELY on board. You two need to sit down, and make a list of your expectations of PeeWee, and how you will both interact with him on a daily basis; the do's and don'ts. Then you must both follow through on what you've agreed upon, with 100% consistency.

It sounds like you've tried some methods of training, and they're kind of working for you (sort of), but maybe they're not the right ones for this dog. If you're getting bit, then something is not working. Not all dogs will respond well to adversive types of training (i.e. being corrected verbally, physically etc.) Some dogs respond much better to positive reinforcement; praise, treats and pats for a job well done, after showing him what you expect (in baby steps).

One thing I would recommend you start with right away is the umbelical technique. Get an 8' leash or even a length of rope, attach one end to his collar and the other around your waist, then go about your daily business in the house. He will not be able to sneak away and pee/poop where he's not supposed to, because you'll know his whereabouts at all times and be able to see when he starts thinking about going someplace inapprorpriate. If you think he needs to go, take him outside. Praise like crazy for a job well done. Treat the potty issues like he was a baby puppy; start from scratch. Establish a routine for potty breaks (first thing in the morning, last thing before bed, after meals and after big play sessions. Having him tied to you will also teach him to watch you for leadership and guidance. There's no need to speak to him or touch the line, just do your thing and he will follow.

Is he getting a good walk at least once a day, on-leash? This is another important exercise for establishing a good working relationship, and burning off energy; a tired dog is a good dog. Does he have stimulating toys and chews in the house?

I personally do not like using the crate for time-outs. It should be a positive place that he can sleep, rest, play and take breaks from humans; it should not be used as punishment, it should be his den. How large is his crate, by the way? If he has room to stand, turn around and lie down, that's all you need; any larger and you are providing room to pee in one end and sleep on the other.

I would recommend that you and your SO sign up for a family obedience class that focuses on positive training methods. Take it together so you both learn the same techniques and tools, so your expectations of PeeWee are crystal clear.

It's really not the little dog's fault. Keep in mind, too, that a frustrated, angry person very often leads to misbehaviour and frustration in a dog; they are incredibly in tune to our emotions and will often mirror them or simply shut down if they are too overwhelmed by negativity. :2cents:

Myka
January 17th, 2010, 08:50 PM
Thanks for your message bendy, and the ideas you have given me! :D

I also agree that the kennel should be his refuge, but I'm not really sure what else to do about his whining/barking, and the kennel is the only thing that is getting me any results. Besides, he spends the first 15 minutes whining in there in the morning when I get up, and anytime I come home until he stops whining, so I figured it would be a good training bridge there.

I will try tying him to me. Will exercise him too. :D

I have been thinking about taking Peewee to obedience classes, but my work schedule is probably not going to work with that. I will check into it. Maybe I can do Saturday classes. The trouble is that I would be taking him alone since the SO is usually out of town for 4-5 weeks at a time, then only home for 1 week. SO is on board for training. It's SO's parents that don't want to follow the new rules, and they will often come take P for the day while I'm at work.

I know P is confused right now. His little world has been turned upside down. P only bites me if I am physically forcing him to do something (like putting him on his back/side in a submissive position). He is biting out of fear. Once I get him in position I give him a doggie massage to get him to relax flat out on his side as he tends to curl into a protective fetal position.

I don't walk P. I don't think he's gone for a walk in his life. I do throw his ball for him (down the hallway) in the morning and night which he has to sit or lay down for, and then "off" the ball when he gets back. He gets that about 30-45 minutes a day.

Here are his new rules:

~ Not allowed to jump onto furniture. I moved his bed mat to the floor now too.
~ Not allowed to invite himself onto someone's lap.
~ If I want him on my lap I will wait until he is in a calm state laying down on his bed/floor, then I pick him up onto my lap.
~ Must sit/stay and be calm befor being allowed outside or inside through the door and feeding.
~ If he barks/whines and doesn't listen when I snap and "shhht!" him he goes in the kennel for a 10 minute timeout (the amount of time it takes for him to stop barking/whining).
~ Everyday I put him on his back and side, and give him a doggie massage until he relaxes.

He has been improving everyday. Not being allowed on the furniture has made a big difference.

bendyfoot
January 17th, 2010, 09:06 PM
If gramma and grampa are not on board and being counter-productive...it's time to find new caregivers. It's not worth it for you or PeeWee. I would be telling them quite plainly that PeeWee's future depends on their compliance; if he's going to be a stable and confident and happy member of the family, he needs his WHOLE pack to be consistent with him so he knows what's expected. Otherwise they are contributing to his fear, confusion, and bad behaviour.

As for the exercise where you're putting him on his side...from what you're describing, I don't think it's a useful exercise for what you want to accomplish. You need to gain trust, security and control, and the rolling seems only to be reinforcing/encouraging his fears - not what you want. Don't get me wrong, I think placing a dog on it's side can be a useful tool, under the right circumstances, I just don't think this is one of them.

If I were you, I'd do this instead: a full-body touch routine. From a Sit, ask him to Stand (use a gently hooked finger under his thigh/belly to lift and hold him so he knows what you want him to do). Stroke and inspect his ears. Look at his teeth, open his mouth. Stoke his head, neck, back, butt, legs. Pick up his feet and look at his nails, between his toes, at his pads. Lift his tail and have a peek there. These are things he needs to be comfy with, and needs to trust you to do. You may find you can't do these things at once...you may need to take small steps, using praise and treats, until he's comfy. Always end on a positive note; if you're getting frustrated, do something he's ok with, praise, and call it a day. Don't let it get to the point where he bites. I think this will be more useful and positive for you both in the long run.

I think you'll find walking him to be extremely helpful for you both!

If the SO is not available to attend obedience classes, then you go, and become the teacher when SO gets home. Show SO, step-by-step, what you've learned, and have SO practice when they get home.

Frenchy
January 17th, 2010, 09:20 PM
I know P is confused right now. His little world has been turned upside down. P only bites me if I am physically forcing him to do something (like putting him on his back/side in a submissive position). He is biting out of fear. Once I get him in position I give him a doggie massage to get him to relax flat out on his side as he tends to curl into a protective fetal position.



and you think this is a good thing ? :confused:

All I can say is I feel so sorry for Peewee, it must be so hard for him knowing he's disliked by his caregiver :(

I'm not trying to flame but, I'm an animal lover, and I can't imagine hating any dog, especially the dog of someone I care about :shrug:
Didn't you know SO had a dog when you met SO? Do you think it's fair to ask SO to dump the dog because you don't like it ?

I guess I just don't understand, although little dogs woud not be my choice of pets, if my SO had one before I met my SO I would learn to accept and like the dog because they are a package deal IMO.

I totally agree happycats.

Myka
January 17th, 2010, 09:38 PM
Thanks Frenchy, your comments really helped the situation. Cheers! Please come back with more helpful tips! ;)

Bendy, P's "grandpa" is the one that comes to get P because he likes spending time the P. Grandma doesn't like P. P walks all over them because they don't have any rules. I think I would have a hard time telling them that they can't come get P when they want to since they were the ones who have raised him. It's a bit of a sticky situation there...not sure what to do. I have suggested P has new rules these days, and they look at me kinda like they don't approve or something. I'm not really sure on that.

I should have been a bit more clear about the exercise of putting him on his side/back. If he is at a "level 8" say when I put him on his back because he's wound up for some reason and I'm using it as a submission training tool then he will resist and he will bite. He's very bitey. If I am just putting him on his side for his massages and he's in a level 2 or 3 he will flop over with just a nudge. I'm doing the massages as a trust and relaxation exercise so he will bond with me.

I do full body stuff too like teeth, ears, toes when he's half-snoozing on my lap. I have heard that "he won't let you" put a thermometer in his butt. How can a 7 lb dog "not let you" do anything to him? LOL

P has actually been very good today. :)

bendyfoot
January 17th, 2010, 09:59 PM
Thanks Frenchy, your comments really helped the situation. Cheers! Please come back with more helpful tips! ;)

Bendy, P's "grandpa" is the one that comes to get P because he likes spending time the P. Grandma doesn't like P. P walks all over them because they don't have any rules. I think I would have a hard time telling them that they can't come get P when they want to since they were the ones who have raised him. It's a bit of a sticky situation there...not sure what to do. I have suggested P has new rules these days, and they look at me kinda like they don't approve or something. I'm not really sure on that.

I guess it depends on what you REALLY want to accomplish: happy home with happy dog or??? Really, it's your SO who should be having the conversation with them

I should have been a bit more clear about the exercise of putting him on his side/back. If he is at a "level 8" say when I put him on his back because he's wound up for some reason and I'm using it as a submission training tool then he will resist and he will bite. He's very bitey. If I am just putting him on his side for his massages and he's in a level 2 or 3 he will flop over with just a nudge. I'm doing the massages as a trust and relaxation exercise so he will bond with me.

If he's relaxed and completely calm and you ask him to go on his side, I don't see a problem with that...I do that with mine if I want to check something out on the underside. But, I must stand by my opinion, again, based on your description: I would not put him on his side if he's at a level 8. You're reinforcing fear at that point. Can you give an example of what he might be doing before you put him on his side? Like I said, it can be a useful tool, but I prefer to use sparingly, and only in the most dire circumstances, not as a daily training tool. In our house, a dog is put on her back ONLY if she has started a full-on aggressive fight with another pack member. I've used it maybe 6 times TOTAL between the three dogs in the past 5 years. It's a life-or-death thing, and quite frankly I mean it to scare the bejeezus out of the dog so they understand in no uncertain terms that what they did was completely unacceptable and worthy of the worst possible punishment by the leader (me). It's NOT useful for daily training IMO; it's extraordinarily stressful for the dog. If you could provide an example of PeeWee's behaviour (i.e. when he's wound up), we could maybe offer some alternative techniques...especially now that you're going to use umbellical.

I do full body stuff too like teeth, ears, toes when he's half-snoozing on my lap. I have heard that "he won't let you" put a thermometer in his butt. How can a 7 lb dog "not let you" do anything to him? LOL

Good. Keep up the touching...it will help desensitize, especially if he's that relaxed.

P has actually been very good today. :)

:thumbs up

Myka
January 17th, 2010, 10:39 PM
I am trying to think of what he was doing when I put him on his back last time...oh I know. I had just given him a bath, and I went to blow dry him (he's used to it, and he will stand for it). I turned it on and started drying him, he tried to take off (he does this lots, bolts when you're putting his sweater on or doing his toes, or putting booties on when it's cold...he's trying to avoid), and I grabbed him by the waist, then he turned around and bit me, so I put him on his back. As I was doing that he was having a full on freak out like "Mini" from Caesar's show if you've seen that episode! So I put him on his back for biting. I think he bit me out of anger for not allowing him to bolt off. He kind of does this, ok I'm staying and doing what you want, I'm staying, I'm staying, I'm done - BOLT. He kind of scoots when he does that.

I will get SO to talk to his parents. I haven't found any obedience classes that will work yet with a Kijiji search.

bendyfoot
January 17th, 2010, 11:03 PM
I am trying to think of what he was doing when I put him on his back last time...oh I know. I had just given him a bath, and I went to blow dry him (he's used to it, and he will stand for it). I turned it on and started drying him, he tried to take off (he does this lots, bolts when you're putting his sweater on or doing his toes, or putting booties on when it's cold...he's trying to avoid), and I grabbed him by the waist, then he turned around and bit me, so I put him on his back.

As I was doing that he was having a full on freak out like "Mini" from Caesar's show if you've seen that episode! So I put him on his back for biting. I think he bit me out of anger for not allowing him to bolt off. He kind of does this, ok I'm staying and doing what you want, I'm staying, I'm staying, I'm done - BOLT. He kind of scoots when he does that.



OK, so in bolting, he's basically saying "I'm overwhelmed and have had enough". You grab him, pull him back, he uses the only other possible thing he has to repeat the message, only louder: a bite. He is very not biting in anger; dogs don't have temper-tantrums and aren't vengeful...he's more likely biting in fear, since his first, POLITE message was ignored and he was "bit" (grabbed) for his efforts. Never forget that you are probably at least 100 lbs bigger than him...you're huge and physically threatening...an agressive approach with him is going to induce fear.

A few things I would consider trying instead. First, have him on a leash when you're doing these activities (umbellical!). Take breaks during the activity (drying, boots) when he's behaving to praise and give him a treat, then resume. If he decides to bolt, simply hold on to the leash....don't actually touch him, and try not to pull him...you already have control via the leash, and you want him to decide that coming to you is a good thing. Call him back to you, offer a treat as a reward. Have him sit, reward. If he's calm, resume the activity. If not, just wait it out; ignore the bad behaviour. I think the trick for you is going to be working on turning these activities where he might usually try to bite into something more positive for him. Remember to keep your own attitude in check; stay light and positive and reward every ounce of good behaviour on his part. Rolling a dog who is biting in what he is perceiving as self-defence is not going to help your situation; it will be very counter-productive.

:2cents:

Myka
January 17th, 2010, 11:11 PM
Ok, I will try what you say. I'm not used to working with a timid dog.

bendyfoot
January 17th, 2010, 11:15 PM
The timid ones are the LAST ones you want to use techniques involving any kind of physical domination...it's just not going to be effective. I've got a dog like that, and it would be totally wasted on her...only stressful, and completely counterproductive for any learning I want her to do.

Give it a try...the results might not be immediate, but I bet they'll be lasting, and a more positive experience for everyone! (Plus it'll be easier to get gramma and grandpa on board! :thumbs up)

Myka
January 17th, 2010, 11:30 PM
Give it a try...the results might not be immediate, but I bet they'll be lasting, and a more positive experience for everyone! (Plus it'll be easier to get gramma and grandpa on board! :thumbs up)

Probably not!! The timid ones are waaaaay more work! I'm just trying to get grandma and grandpa to not give P attention unless he is calm, and to not let him jump on the couch/lap without being invited (pick him up onto the couch/lap instead) or when he's whining. They aren't following even those simple rules. :shrug: I think it will be better when SO comes home in 10 days and sees how much progress P has made. Then I think he will be able to talk his parents into following the rules...maybe. :fingerscr

cassiek
January 18th, 2010, 01:42 AM
Myka,

How is PeeWee been these past few days? I skimmed through the posts and it sounds like you have had some good successes with him lately! Keep it up!! :thumbs up

Does he have a favorite treat, toy etc.? Each dog has something (although it may not be what you think) that they usually will do anything for and might be helpful in helping to reinforce some of his positive behaviour! Every dog is different... for example my boxer I find I need to be more stern with and while she won't do anything for food or a treat, she will do ANYTHING for her fave toy... while my little gal would be terrified and I would crush her soul if I ever raised my voice to her, :laughing:! Hopefully you can find something that he will be inspired to do anything for!

Also, I read somewhere he hasn't been walked ever. Is this something you could start working on? I agree that a tired dog is a good dog, and taking the little guy for a walk everyday (it wouldn't need to be hours long as he's tiny) but would probably help alleviate some of his behavioural issues.

Best of luck!! I'm rooting for you!!!!!! :D

aslan
January 18th, 2010, 06:06 AM
OK, so in bolting, he's basically saying "I'm overwhelmed and have had enough". You grab him, pull him back, he uses the only other possible thing he has to repeat the message, only louder: a bite. He is very not biting in anger; dogs don't have temper-tantrums and aren't vengeful...he's more likely biting in fear, since his first, POLITE message was ignored and he was "bit" (grabbed) for his efforts. Never forget that you are probably at least 100 lbs bigger than him...you're huge and physically threatening...an agressive approach with him is going to induce fear.

A few things I would consider trying instead. First, have him on a leash when you're doing these activities (umbellical!). Take breaks during the activity (drying, boots) when he's behaving to praise and give him a treat, then resume. If he decides to bolt, simply hold on to the leash....don't actually touch him, and try not to pull him...you already have control via the leash, and you want him to decide that coming to you is a good thing. Call him back to you, offer a treat as a reward. Have him sit, reward. If he's calm, resume the activity. If not, just wait it out; ignore the bad behaviour. I think the trick for you is going to be working on turning these activities where he might usually try to bite into something more positive for him. Remember to keep your own attitude in check; stay light and positive and reward every ounce of good behaviour on his part. Rolling a dog who is biting in what he is perceiving as self-defence is not going to help your situation; it will be very counter-productive.

:2cents:


just wanted to add a little something to bendy's excellent advice..as a retired groomer i've had to do this a million times. I'll use Cesar as an example for you since you seem to relate with him..If you are working with P and he is getting a little stressed do as Bendy said, but this is the most important thing. As P's stress is building so is yours, you HAVE to take a few deep breathes and calm yourself first. P will pick up on your emotions too. If you're getting frustrated, tense etc, it will add to his escalation. And make P come to you most importantly.

Myka
January 18th, 2010, 07:23 PM
P has his umbilical cord on now and he's not impressed!! This will be good for him. Althoug it's kind of going against what I have been teaching him the last few days. I have been getting him to stay on his bed when I'm doing my thing around the house because he's always on lookout for me to move, and zooms anytime I even think about getting up. So I was teaching him to chill out by staying on his bed. Oh well, we will try this.

Cassie, P has really improved in the last 3-4 days. P doesn't have a treat or toy that he will do anything for. Cheese would probably be the best bet, but if I'm doing anything directly with him like trying to teach him to lay down he is nervous enough that he doesn't go for the cheese so much. He is scared when he doesn't understand. I'm not much of a walker (I work a very physical job), but that's why we have a big yard, and a nice long hallway. Good for ball tossing! :)

Thanks aslan, I do get frustrated with P easily because there is that part of me that resents that I have to teach a 4 year old dog such basics. It's more frustration that someone else hasn't done the training, not the frustration at him directly, but I'm sure he still picks up on it. It's more that I'm forced into teaching him this stuff. It's one thing to choose to adopt an older pet with no training or a puppy, but another to be put in the position when you're still grieving for your own dog. I think in the end I will like him more, and he will be much happier. I just have to keep thinking about that. :)

Marcha
January 18th, 2010, 07:44 PM
Keep on keeping on Myka. It's going to be a reward in itself, to see that Peewee will see you as the authority, simply because you're taking charge. It might be more work with SO being away so much, and the in-laws not being on board, but it'll get there.

Bodhi didn't like umbillical either, at first. But it's made a lot of difference. So don't give up.

As for walking - just going out for a brief walk will give Peewee something to do - we call it 'reading the news'. Sniffing around also keeps the dogs' minds busy, because they're getting to know who's who and what's what around the neighbourhood. It doesn't really matter whether you've got a large yard or no yard at all - it's nothing more than a guilded large kennel if they don't get to 'migrate' a few times each day.

Here's a good article about the importance of a walk, for any dog:

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/articles/dogwalk.htm

It'll give you a clearer idea of why walking with your dog is one of the most important things you can do to establish trust, respect and leadership.

t.pettet
January 18th, 2010, 08:16 PM
Poor little Peewee, no wonder he's confused and scared with no discipline from one set of people and trying to adapt to physical, restraining, resentful angry training methods from another.

Myka
January 18th, 2010, 08:23 PM
Thanks for your wonderful advice Pettet! Thank you for your generous contributions to the thread. Good job. ;)

Thanks for the link Marcha, I will read it. I won't give up the umbilical. He will figure it out. :)

t.pettet
January 19th, 2010, 04:59 PM
You are oh so welcome, anytime.

shirley1011
January 19th, 2010, 06:26 PM
Myka..I can relate to your not "liking" the dog. When our Sable went missing and DH got our Jack dog, I didn't much like him either. I resented him..thought he was taking Sable's place but with time I have come to love Jack and know he can never take Sable's place in my heart...just a different place. Sounds like you two are bonding already! Keep up the good work.

Golden Girls
January 20th, 2010, 09:23 AM
I'm so sorry for your recent lost :( :rip: Myka

Your honesty throughout is quite refreshing however the situation an extremely sad one. I cannot offer any training advice but as usual Bendyfoot & others have given some great ideas :thumbs up

I agree with Cassiek's post it wasn't and isn't fair to you. But the problem isn't with PeeWee but your SO. PeeWee lived most of his life with his parents whom the mom didn't like and without bounderies, no kidding this little guy is confused and insecure. No sooner after you moved in you were dealing with a emotional roller coaster then the loss of your :( beloved dog all the while PeeWee wondering where is his place in all of this right?

If you feel you are up to helping him with positive reinforcement then kudos but if you don't then please seek out a Chi rescue for help :shrug:

ps I get why your resentful I just don't get why it's towards PeeWee?

Myka
January 20th, 2010, 06:59 PM
I am being pretty d*** honest about my feelings regarding the situation, and the fact that P just isn't the personality type that I get along with. I believe this is pretty important information as I seek to train P. Some people are taking this thread a little too personally. I signed P up for obedience classes with a trio of trainers who train for Schutzhund, so I'm hoping they will be good. It doesn't start until late February though. Even though I don't really like P, I do care about him, and I do want him to be a balanced, happy dog. Just because I don't like him doesn't mean I can't teach him to be a balanced, happy dog. I wouldn't take the time and effort to put P through these obedience training sessions (or even start this thread in the first place!) if I didn't care about his well-being.

Hi Shirley, I don't feel like Peewee is replacing Myka by any means. Myka and P lived together since March 2009, so I was used to having Peewee around, but SO dealt with since he was home then, and he didn't seem to think there was anything wrong with P's behavior. Now that SO is working out of town again I have to look after P, and I believe there is a lot wrong with P's behavior! So P's training issue needs to be resolved. I think it is unacceptable to not give a dog some training - it is disrespectful to the dog imo as they never learn how to be balanced, happy dogs. So many people think that small dogs don't need training. This seems to be the case with P. It just so happens the training has been dumped on my lap instead of his owner's. :frustrated: I have never worked with a timid dog like P so I get frustrated because the training techniques I have learned in the past for other dogs isn't working with P. I haven't had an untrained dog in a decade.


ps I get why your resentful I just don't get why it's towards PeeWee?

It's more frustration that someone else hasn't done the training, not the frustration at him directly, but I'm sure he still picks up on it.

:clown:

Kay9
January 20th, 2010, 07:22 PM
Hi Myka;

Let me first say how sorry I am for the loss of your dog :candle:.

I also understand your frustration at inheriting "Peewee the Terrorist" (that expression gave me quite a chuckle). I'm by no means an expert, but one thing kind of stands out to me--the little guy is definitely dominant, has fear aggression, and dominance training tactics are no longer used in current day obedience training. Alpha rolls, in particular, encourage biting and adversarial behaviour (which Peewee has tons of already!).

I think I read earlier that you and your SO were taking Peewee to obedience class and that's great--I think you should receive all the support you need, and not be stuck struggling on your own. Your SO needs to step up and take equal responsibility for Peewee and his needs. In the end, though, it's ok if you decide to rehome Peewee. It might just be the best outcome for everyone.

cassiek
January 20th, 2010, 10:39 PM
Hi Myka,

That's awesome you signed up for obedience classes with P! :thumbs up I am sure this will help 110%!!

I agree with you too... I find often most people don't think its necessary to train a smaller dog, and quite the opposite is true! If you say to them "Would you find this behaviour acceptable if the dog weighed 100 lbs?" and they are appalled and say "No, of course not!". I find people treat these smaller dogs as babies and don't enforce any rules. Although this certainly does not hold true in all cases!

Best of luck!

Golden Girls
January 21st, 2010, 05:01 PM
That's great news about the classes, I wish you the best of luck :)

Luvmypitgirls
January 23rd, 2010, 04:57 PM
Myka, I applaud you for stepping up and trying to instill some basics in P. I understand your frustration, and I'm glad you are trying not to take it out on P directly, as that would be counterproductive for both of you.
As I read thru this thread, I must admit that I was shaking my head, not at your frustration, but at your SO. I don't mean to offend when I say this, but why in Dogs name did he get a dog he didn't have time for in the first place? Not only was it unfair to P, but it's also unfair to everyone else that has had to take up the responsibilities.
I commend you for all that you have done and are doing for P, and regardless of what happens, whether you decided to keep him or rehome him, at least you tried to do your best.
I wish you the best of luck, and best wishes to P too.

Myka
January 23rd, 2010, 08:22 PM
Thanks for everyone's support. :o

SO bought P from Petland to boot. When SO's best friend went to look for a puppy SO got suckered in too. He shouldn't have bought P, but apparently he was VERY cute. P does have that going for him. LOL! SO's friend bought his puppy Diesel (Chi/Pug) as a ride along buddy (he drives semi trucks). SO was also driving truck, so figured he should get a ride along buddy too. Sadly, he changed jobs only a few months later to work out of town (sometimes out of province), so P got ditched on SO's mom. SO should have found him a home at that point when P was still a puppy and it would have been easier to find him a home.

P has been doing really well aside from a barking spell today that I got really frustrated. :frustrated:

Kay9
January 24th, 2010, 04:37 PM
Does this website support videos? If so, I would love to see the little fur tyke!

Myka
January 24th, 2010, 06:54 PM
Here are some pics...

http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k43/Myka82/IMG_2041.jpg

His -40 outift:
http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k43/Myka82/Dec152009.jpg

rainbow
January 24th, 2010, 08:42 PM
I've never been a big fan of tiny dogs but Peanut is a real cutie. :lovestruck: It would be hard for me to adjust to a little dog too but I'm sure I could and you are definitely doing a good job of it. :thumbs up

I've been reading this thread but haven't replied cuz I agreed with the info you'd been given already. I have to say I am surprised that your bf (and his friend) picked small breeds as companions .....all the truckers I've known have had bigger breeds. :shrug:

Maybe I just know the big burly ones. :D

Myka
January 24th, 2010, 08:45 PM
Yes Peewee is pretty cute, but those big bulbous eyes are kinda freaky!! LOL

I'm a "trucker" too, and I've seen some small dogs, some medium ones. I saw one with a big Boxer puppy, a few Border Collies, and that type. Most of the women have smaller dogs. I don't know how them guys handle having a bigger dog in the truck! The nice thing about P is that he can happily stretch out on the seat, and can move around freely.

Kay9
January 26th, 2010, 07:35 PM
Here are some pics...


Cute little peanut, isn't he! Probably isn't fond of the camera (or the bath), I'll bet!

Myka
January 30th, 2010, 10:10 PM
P's pretty shy. He doesn't like much of anything except soft squeaky toys and snuggles. Haha!

An update on P: The only two things I am really having troubles with him now is his incessant barking when I leave the house (crated) or leave him in the car (it's running this time of year). I'm not sure how to tackle that issue. I was thinking one of those citronella collars, but I worry about him getting citronella'd in a confined space. He has a collar that makes a high pitched noise when he barks, and he couldn't care less. If he is in his crate he doesn't listen to any verbal corrections. Any ideas?