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Any suggestions???

Luvmypitgirls
January 9th, 2010, 10:33 PM
I have decided that I really want to quit smoking. I have set a quit date for February 1.
I am going to go see my doctor about Welbutrin, which assisted me in quitting once before, but when my mother died, I started again.
I was on Welbutrin and the patch, and it worked great for me.
This time however, I want to try and do it without the patch, which will be more difficult I know, but I want to drop the nicotine completely from day 1.

Are there any ex smokers here, that have some ideas to help with the quitting process? Anybody care to share their "quitting experiences" with me?
Any suggestions on how to make the process a little easier would be greatly appreciated.:)
I need to be successful this time, I have quit 5 times in the past, but this time I really want it to be the last time.

luckypenny
January 9th, 2010, 11:19 PM
You're so brave :goodvibes:. I wish I had advice for you but that would mean I was an ex-smoker :rolleyes:. I told myself by the time I turned 20 I'd quit. Then by the time I turned 30. 40 is around the corner and it's been a lot on my mind lately too :o.

Keep us updated on how it goes ok? I wish you all the best of luck and strength to kick it for good this time :fingerscr :goodvibes:.

mikischo
January 9th, 2010, 11:30 PM
Sorry, I can't give you any advice from personal experience. I gave it a try recently using champix but after two weeks, I discontinued it because I realized I wasn't motivated enough.:frustrated:so why waste my money smoking and taking the drug at the same time. I do plan to try it again in the very near future.

However, my bf quit on November 2 and hasn't smoked since. He had smoked for about 40 years. He is doing great, so it can be done. He used Champix, but whatever you use or whether you use no quitting aids at all, I know you have to really want to quit or nothing will work.

mikischo
January 9th, 2010, 11:36 PM
I downloaded a book in pdf form called "Allen Carr's Easy Way to Stop Smoking." I didn't quite finish reading it but I plan on going back to the beginning to read it again. If you like I could email it to you, if you pm me your email address.

Tommysmom
January 10th, 2010, 12:33 AM
The key is that you really have to want to quit. Not just think you might want to, but really, really want to. No cutting down, no just having one with your coffee, but really quit - set the day, throw out the cigarettes, and that's it. I've tried patches, gum, hypnosis, you name it I've done it, and nothing worked. Last year hubby and I both quit before the baby was born - he used champix for a few weeks and I went cold turkey. It's hard! I still want to smoke sometimes and it's been almost a year. You just have to take it hour by hour, day by day... and sometimes minute by minute. Good luck!

Luvmypitgirls
January 10th, 2010, 02:15 AM
The key is that you really have to want to quit. Not just think you might want to, but really, really want to. No cutting down, no just having one with your coffee, but really quit - set the day, throw out the cigarettes, and that's it. I've tried patches, gum, hypnosis, you name it I've done it, and nothing worked. Last year hubby and I both quit before the baby was born - he used champix for a few weeks and I went cold turkey. It's hard! I still want to smoke sometimes and it's been almost a year. You just have to take it hour by hour, day by day... and sometimes minute by minute. Good luck!

I really really want to quit. I've set the day, and I'm prepared to give it my all.
I've heard Champix has some really harsh side effects, so I don't think I'd use it, but I would like to try the Welbutrin again. I had quit for almost 5 months, on Welbutrin for 3 of those. When mom died it was just too much and I started again. I regretted it from that first "drag".
I can't even smoke a whole ciggy, I light one take a couple drags put it out, it takes about 4 trips to the garage to finish one smoke.
It's just time to give it up completely.
I hope my hubby will quit too, but I won't pressure him, it's gotta be his choice.
I did the math...it's ridiculous. We spend 20 dollars a day, 20x7=140/wk x4=560/mo x12= 6720 dollars/yr.:eek:
Now that's just nuts.... I am truly ready to quit.

Luvmypitgirls
January 10th, 2010, 02:18 AM
You're so brave :goodvibes:. I wish I had advice for you but that would mean I was an ex-smoker :rolleyes:. I told myself by the time I turned 20 I'd quit. Then by the time I turned 30. 40 is around the corner and it's been a lot on my mind lately too :o.

Keep us updated on how it goes ok? I wish you all the best of luck and strength to kick it for good this time :fingerscr :goodvibes:.

Thank you for the encouragement LP, I will most certainly keep you updated.

free
January 10th, 2010, 11:08 AM
can't give advice as i'm still puffing away. if you go to www.lung.ca they have tips and and how to get help in quitting. good luck

JanM
January 10th, 2010, 11:36 AM
Good for you! I wish you well. I've been smoking for over 50 years and have tried everything - acupuncture, hypnosis, the patch, champix, nicorette - and I'm still smoking. What I have learned though, is that it doesn't matter what you use - they are all crutches. I have stopped for up to 3 months and when I did that, it was cold turkey - I just decided I'd had enough. Why I started again is yet another story but the very best "tool" to help with the not smoking is to know that you are not giving something up - you are gaining your health (not to mention wealth). Another idea that might help is, whenever you get a craving use an affirmation like "I choose health." Deep breathing - really deep breathing - whenever you get a craving will do wonders. The craving only lasts for a few seconds but if you let your mind dwell on it - it becomes a challenge. Deep breathing will help with relaxation and, when you do it, just focus on your breath going in and out - nothing else. The craving will disappear.

Someone mentioned Allan Carr's book and I've read it - and stopped for a week after I read it.

You've sure got my support!

Cathy1
January 10th, 2010, 11:38 AM
I am trying to quit too. I went from 1 pack +/day to 1 pack every 3-4 days. I have tried cold turkey but that didn't work. It makes it harder when someone else in the household smokes because even if they smoke outside you can smell the smoke on their clothing.

14+kitties
January 10th, 2010, 11:38 AM
*14+ stands up in the back corner of the room, raises her arm and says "Yes, I am an ex smoker".*
I smoked for 32 years. I tried quitting once when my kids were small and I had a child care in the house. After a week my ex husband went to the store and bought me a pack of smokes. He couldn't put up with my bitchiness any more. :o

Fast forward a lot of years. I never tried quitting again until a few years back. There were times I cut back but mostly I had a one pack a day habit which was becoming increasingly expensive. So when I made up my mind to stop I went to the doctor and got Zyban (Wellbutrin), picked my quit date (my birthday) and the rest is history.
http://www.quitsmoking.com/zyban/index.htm
If you had taken Wellbutrin before you know the side effects so I won't go into them. The only one I suffered from was dry mouth.

By the time my birthday rolled around I was down to one smoke a day. That morning I went outside, sat on my deck, and enjoyed my last smoke. That was 7 years, 4 months ago. There are times I want a smoke really badly but I find something to do and it quickly passes. I have even been at the point where I was ready to get in my car and go buy a pack but never gave in. It only lasts about 10 minutes and it's gone for another month or more.

The secret is you have to be ready to quit. No one else can do it for you. Good luck. I am sure you can be successful!! :thumbs up

Oh yeah - I replaced that addiction with one that costs even more............. CATS!!!! :)

bendyfoot
January 10th, 2010, 12:10 PM
Good for you!

I was never a heavy or long-term smoker, but I smoked quite regularly for about 5 years. Even now, 8 years later, I still get very strong urges...I don't think it ever totally goes away. I can't imagine what it must be like for someone who smoked for decades to quit...congratulations to all of you who succeeded!

What helped me was that I took up a hobby where smoking was totally counter-productive: running. I decided to sign up for a 5km charity run, told everyone about it so I couldn't wimp out, and basically quit smoking and started running the same week. After the first "run" (which was basically about 2 minutes of huffing and puffing, followed by a lot of walking :laughing:) I found myself coughing up a bunch of really nasty phlegm...crap in my lungs. This continued after every run for about 2 weeks...I figured the extra working of my lungs was helping purge them of the nastiness in there.

Anytime I thought of having a cigarette, I just thought "your run tomorrow is just going to be that much harder, you need your lungs to be healthy and strong to carry you through that workout".

Anyways, I know it's not for everyone, but I think the general idea of replacing the bad habit with a good one can be helpful :2cents:

marko
January 10th, 2010, 12:17 PM
"....No cutting down, no just having one with your coffee, but really quit - set the day, throw out the cigarettes, and that's it. I've tried patches, gum, hypnosis, you name it I've done it, and nothing worked. Last year hubby and I both quit before the baby was born - he used champix for a few weeks and I went cold turkey. It's hard! I still want to smoke sometimes and it's been almost a year. You just have to take it hour by hour, day by day... and sometimes minute by minute. Good luck!..

This is good advice imo...choose the day and stick with it. sugarless GUM is a great distraction when you're having a nic fit. Brushing your teeth more often also seems to keep the cravings down.

But mentally, it has to be cold turkey or a gradual workdown toward zero cigarettes a day. Only then can each day of No smoking be its own reward.
You'll see after 1 month (1st month is hardest) you will be proud of yourself and that pride will be its own reward to continue.

Also your sense of smell and taste should improve dramatically, as should your overall feeling of well-being.

Plus as a further motivator, on average, every pack of cigarettes shortens your life by 3.5 hours (Just saw that at the Bodies exhibition).
So a pack a day smoker loses about 50 days of living each year compared to a non smoker. That's a lot of life-shortening.

Good luck :fingerscr :goodvibes:

Luvmypitgirls
January 10th, 2010, 01:40 PM
*14+ stands up in the back corner of the room, raises her arm and says "Yes, I am an ex smoker".*
I smoked for 32 years. I tried quitting once when my kids were small and I had a child care in the house. After a week my ex husband went to the store and bought me a pack of smokes. He couldn't put up with my bitchiness any more. :o

Fast forward a lot of years. I never tried quitting again until a few years back. There were times I cut back but mostly I had a one pack a day habit which was becoming increasingly expensive. So when I made up my mind to stop I went to the doctor and got Zyban (Wellbutrin), picked my quit date (my birthday) and the rest is history.
http://www.quitsmoking.com/zyban/index.htm
If you had taken Wellbutrin before you know the side effects so I won't go into them. The only one I suffered from was dry mouth.

By the time my birthday rolled around I was down to one smoke a day. That morning I went outside, sat on my deck, and enjoyed my last smoke. That was 7 years, 4 months ago. There are times I want a smoke really badly but I find something to do and it quickly passes. I have even been at the point where I was ready to get in my car and go buy a pack but never gave in. It only lasts about 10 minutes and it's gone for another month or more.

The secret is you have to be ready to quit. No one else can do it for you. Good luck. I am sure you can be successful!! :thumbs up

Oh yeah - I replaced that addiction with one that costs even more............. CATS!!!! :)

14+, the only side effect I had from Wellbutrin, was really fantastic dreams! Seriously, I had the most outrageous dreams, none of them nightmares just extreme weirdness, like blue elephants flying helicopters :laughing: I remember waking up in the morning telling hubby about my dreams, and I couldn't wait to go to sleep at night.:laughing:

The more I think I about it, the stronger my resolve is to quit. I think I am leaning more towards going cold turkey, I know it sounds weird but something in me is saying, I owe it to myself to fight a hard fight. If it becomes too much then I can consider an aide.
I think you replaced your smoking addiction with a much healthier and more productive addiction..:thumbs up

I'm thinking I'll replace my smoking addiction, with a scrapbooking addiction :laughing:
My biggest fear is putting on a bunch of weight, so I think I'm going to have to start adding a lot more walks to my daily routine, certainly couldn't hurt.

Love4himies
January 10th, 2010, 01:48 PM
The key is that you really have to want to quit. Not just think you might want to, but really, really want to. No cutting down, no just having one with your coffee, but really quit - set the day, throw out the cigarettes, and that's it. I've tried patches, gum, hypnosis, you name it I've done it, and nothing worked. Last year hubby and I both quit before the baby was born - he used champix for a few weeks and I went cold turkey. It's hard! I still want to smoke sometimes and it's been almost a year. You just have to take it hour by hour, day by day... and sometimes minute by minute. Good luck!

That is what DH and I did when we quit. I WANTED to be a non smoker and admired those who did not smoke and pictured my life without cigarettes.

Just a warning, to make it successful, we did have to veer (sp??) away from our smoker friends and socialize more with our non smoker friends.

I am not going to lie, it was hard, but only for about a month, first two weeks being the hardest.

We both quit cold turkey and at that time there were no "crutches" to help, but I think it is is better that way. If you really, really want to quit you can.

GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I hope you do it! :grouphug:


BTW, life is soooooooooooooo much better without them, you will not believe how much healthier you feel.

Frenchy
January 10th, 2010, 04:27 PM
I need to be successful this time, I have quit 5 times in the past, but this time I really want it to be the last time.

they say it usually takes 6-7 times for many smokers to quit. :o I can't give you any advices because I tried many times and failed. Twice with the patch , twice cold turkey :eek: and once by laser.


Like others said , it think it works when you are really ready to quit.

Good luck to you ! :fingerscr :goodvibes:

Luvmypitgirls
January 10th, 2010, 07:21 PM
Well I approached hubby about my quitting, and asking him to help me.
I asked him to make a conscious effort to not smoke in our vehicles, when he does go out for a smoke I'd like him to brush his teeth and change his clothes, yeah more laundry for me to do, but every little thing he can do to help me will be appreciated.
Then to my immense surprise, he told me he is going to quit with me.
I showed him the numbers, and he said "no honey, it's more like 650 a month!"
Health issues aside, the monetary factors are a huge motivation.
He will not attempt to go cold turkey, he is going to see the doctor about Champix. That's fine by me, if he quits that's awesome and I'll support him any way I can.

aslan
January 10th, 2010, 07:29 PM
hey Lmpg,,, like frenchy i've tried several times to quit and so far haven't done it...I do know that busterboo used Champix and is still smoke free..She said the major side effect was feeling ummmm pukish...i've spoken to a pharmacist and they said if that is the side effect you can take Gravol with champix...i wish you the best of luck...:grouphug:

happycats
January 10th, 2010, 08:18 PM
It's been 11 years (jan 1st 2010) yup, new years resolution that I actually kept :D

It was very very diffucult for me to quit, and I basically had to change everything that I associated with smoking, like coffee, I switched to tea, I no longer went outside for breaks and lunch at work, (I stayed in the building since it's all smoke free)
When I was home I tried to keep my hands busy at all times. I cleaned out every cupboard, washed my baseboards, took up rug hooking (hated it) and even started doing a nightly workout.
I chewed pack after pack of gum, and ate lots and lots of sunflower seeds.

I guess it's about taking it minute by minute, then by hour then days then weeks.

I kept a half pack of smokes in my purse, it was like a security thing for me (most people can't have any around then when they quit) it took about 6 months before I could finally throw them out.

Another thing, I didn't go near, or hang out with any smokers for about the first 3 weeks, it was just to hard and tempting for me.

Good luck, and believe you can do it, ad you will :):goodvibes::fingerscr :2huggers:

budgrrl
January 10th, 2010, 08:56 PM
lmpg - good on you girl!!
i have quit before and did very well on the patch. however, my only mistake was thinking i could be a casual smoker. i was sooo stupid! i didnt crave it, just set my mind to think that when i had a beer, i would have a smoke, or if i went to my friends for a visit, i would bum one of hers. needless to say i am an all or nothing kinda gal! i went from not smoking for a whole year, to smoking a pack a day in no time :(
i am now trying to quit - cold turkey. i WAS doing well, but had a blind date, and figured the nerves could use a smoke (or 10!). so now am back to square one again!
for me, money was the huge motivating factor! $11 per pack, per day...$330 a month, $4000 a year!
i wish you the best success!! you can do it!! :grouphug:

Frenchy
January 10th, 2010, 09:01 PM
ok so I don't know if this would work for most people but it did for someone I know , and if , when , I try again , I will try this way.

This friend started to "light up" later each day ... like if she got up at 6 , she would normally have a smoke , first day she waited until 7 am , next day 8 am .... and so on .... and it worked for her. :crazy:

Luvmypitgirls
January 10th, 2010, 10:37 PM
ok so I don't know if this would work for most people but it did for someone I know , and if , when , I try again , I will try this way.

This friend started to "light up" later each day ... like if she got up at 6 , she would normally have a smoke , first day she waited until 7 am , next day 8 am .... and so on .... and it worked for her. :crazy:

I've been doing that actually, instead of going to the garage when I get up I wait a 1/2 hour to an hour.
I have also stopped smoking right after I eat. Whenever I have a craving I wait for 15 to 20 minutes.

clm
January 10th, 2010, 11:51 PM
I wish you so much luck trying to quit. I wish I had your ambition to give it a try again, but alas I have no will power or desire to even attempt it right now. The longest I've ever quit for was 3 months and that was in the days before the patch so it was a cold turkey stint.
I do remember that when I had first quit, the smell of someone lighting up and getting a whiff of the nicotine was intoxicating, but after about 3 weeks the smell changed to being something aweful.

clm

Tommysmom
January 11th, 2010, 08:53 PM
Well I approached hubby about my quitting, and asking him to help me.
I asked him to make a conscious effort to not smoke in our vehicles, when he does go out for a smoke I'd like him to brush his teeth and change his clothes, yeah more laundry for me to do, but every little thing he can do to help me will be appreciated.
Then to my immense surprise, he told me he is going to quit with me.
I showed him the numbers, and he said "no honey, it's more like 650 a month!"
Health issues aside, the monetary factors are a huge motivation.
He will not attempt to go cold turkey, he is going to see the doctor about Champix. That's fine by me, if he quits that's awesome and I'll support him any way I can.

That's awesome! I know I couldn't have done it without my hubby, and I really think that if we both hadn't quit together we wouldn't have had the strength to stay away from smoking. I really, really wish you the best of luck!

I swore I'd never be one of those preachy ex-smokers who attacks every smoker around, but since you already want to quit I just thought I'd share some of my experience from the last year...

I can now jog - and breathe at the same time.
I don't cough in the mornings.
I can smell everything... clearly... never realized how much I was missing!
Everything tastes so much better. Foods have subtle flavours I must have missed before.
My 'asthma' attacks have disappeared.
I'm healthier - generally just healthier. Less colds and stuff, feel better, just generally feel healthier. Hard to describe but definitely better.
I smell better! My hair, my clothes, my skin... you can actually smell the scent of my shampoo or my perfume or my laundry detergent.
My belongings and my dog smell better. I thought since I only smoked outside that it didn't affect my dog and my house, and I was wrong - it's on you, so it's on everything you touch. It gets on everything.

Just thought I'd share, in case you needed a wee bit of inspiration. It's so worth it, it really is. Feel free to pm if you ever need a bit of venting/support/somebody to scream at when you need some nicotine/whatever.

Luvmypitgirls
January 12th, 2010, 02:01 PM
I do remember that when I had first quit, the smell of someone lighting up and getting a whiff of the nicotine was intoxicating, but after about 3 weeks the smell changed to being something aweful.

clm

clm, that's the one thing I remember last time I attempted to quit. It was about three weeks into quitting when I was at Blockbuster to rent a movie, this woman walked past me, I could smell she had just had a smoke, it was absolutely wretched! I thought to myself,"omg, did I smell like that?" :o

That's awesome! I know I couldn't have done it without my hubby, and I really think that if we both hadn't quit together we wouldn't have had the strength to stay away from smoking. I really, really wish you the best of luck!

I swore I'd never be one of those preachy ex-smokers who attacks every smoker around, but since you already want to quit I just thought I'd share some of my experience from the last year...

I can now jog - and breathe at the same time.
I don't cough in the mornings.
I can smell everything... clearly... never realized how much I was missing!
Everything tastes so much better. Foods have subtle flavours I must have missed before.
My 'asthma' attacks have disappeared.
I'm healthier - generally just healthier. Less colds and stuff, feel better, just generally feel healthier. Hard to describe but definitely better.
I smell better! My hair, my clothes, my skin... you can actually smell the scent of my shampoo or my perfume or my laundry detergent.
My belongings and my dog smell better. I thought since I only smoked outside that it didn't affect my dog and my house, and I was wrong - it's on you, so it's on everything you touch. It gets on everything.

Just thought I'd share, in case you needed a wee bit of inspiration. It's so worth it, it really is. Feel free to pm if you ever need a bit of venting/support/somebody to scream at when you need some nicotine/whatever.

Thank you for the inspiration! I look forward to all the benefits of quitting. I am very determined this time.
And thank you for the offer of pm'ing you if I need a bit of venting/support, but I promise not to scream at you...:D.

dollface
January 13th, 2010, 04:14 PM
Got no stories cuz I've never been a smoker. My parents have tried to quit in the past but no success. But I'm wishing you well!! Have you thought about those electronic cigarettes out there?

E-Cigarette (or electronic cigarette), the modern method of kicking the smoking habit. Featuring premium cigarette flavor, packaging, look and feel. People will be amazed when they see this realistic e-cigarette pulled out of its ultra-real box package, and witness that it puffs and smokes like a real cigarette, but without the smell or nuisance. For easing the transition, this set comes with 4 cartridges that start from a high level and gradually moves to a no nicotine level. Each level is long lasting (with the approx amount of smoking 20 cigarettes) and makes the habit feel natural through the whole process. The e-cigarettes are tar free and non-carcinogenic. The electronic cigarette package is easy to use, small, and most of all an inexpensive way of quitting the smoking habit (compared to less effective nicotine gums or patches).

Luvmypitgirls
January 14th, 2010, 03:31 AM
Got no stories cuz I've never been a smoker. My parents have tried to quit in the past but no success. But I'm wishing you well!! Have you thought about those electronic cigarettes out there?

Thank you for your well wishes, I appreciate it.
I have heard of the electronic cigarettes, but I don't think it's for me. It prolongs the "smoking effect", holding a ciggy, puffing on it and such, I'm not so sure I would find that an effective way of quitting for me.
I have decided that I am going to do it cold turkey. My life is worth fighting for, and as absurd as it sounds I need it to be difficult, I need the challenge.
Infact I am thinking instead of waiting until the 1st of Feb, I'm moving my quit date up to this coming Monday, the 19th. My hubby is content on waiting until the 1st, however he has agreed not to smoke in the garage, he will take it outside.
Yesterday and today I only smoked 4 cigarettes, I've gone from a pack a day, to less than half a pack and now for the past couple of days just a few.
Tomorrow, I'm hoping to cut it down even more, like perhaps 2 or 3.

dollface
January 14th, 2010, 05:13 AM
Woohoo! Way to go LMPG! :D :highfive:

Dog Dancer
January 14th, 2010, 03:18 PM
LMPG - I wish you and your hubby both success. Like others have said you really have to want to do it before you can do it. I'm lucky that I never smoked, my addiction is food sadly. But same idea. Last Spring I lost my mother to lung cancer. She had tried many, many times over the years to quit, but never managed to do it. She knew when she was diagnosed with cancer that it was entirely her own fault and she was prepared to deal with the consequences of it. It was very sad. I'm still devastated that I lost my mother to something so senseless. Please find the strength for yourself and your family, you will never regret it. And yes, no offense intended to anyone because I know an addiction is an addiction, but smokers do smell!! :D Do keep us posted (good or bad, we'll support you no matter what) we're all pulling for you and will help pick you up if you need it at some point.

Tommysmom
January 14th, 2010, 03:22 PM
Thank you for your well wishes, I appreciate it.
I have heard of the electronic cigarettes, but I don't think it's for me. It prolongs the "smoking effect", holding a ciggy, puffing on it and such, I'm not so sure I would find that an effective way of quitting for me.
I have decided that I am going to do it cold turkey. My life is worth fighting for, and as absurd as it sounds I need it to be difficult, I need the challenge.
Infact I am thinking instead of waiting until the 1st of Feb, I'm moving my quit date up to this coming Monday, the 19th. My hubby is content on waiting until the 1st, however he has agreed not to smoke in the garage, he will take it outside.
Yesterday and today I only smoked 4 cigarettes, I've gone from a pack a day, to less than half a pack and now for the past couple of days just a few.
Tomorrow, I'm hoping to cut it down even more, like perhaps 2 or 3.

Be proud, that's great! Good luck on Monday!!

TeriM
January 15th, 2010, 01:57 AM
I wish you great success :goodvibes: :fingerscr :goodvibes:.

I have never smoked but I have known a few people who quit a few years back and one of them said the best thing that helped her was a plastic cigarette :shrug:. She said that one of the things was to have a few "drags" of it after eating and it then helped clear the food tastes from her mouth which then curbed the urge to smoke after coffee or eating :shrug:.

Dunno, just passing on what helped her and recently our radio station was asking people to phone with tips and a bunch of people commented on how useful the plastic cig was.

Again, good luck :goodvibes:.

dollface
January 18th, 2010, 11:16 PM
So how'd your first day go smoke free?

Luvmypitgirls
January 19th, 2010, 03:44 PM
So how'd your first day go smoke free?

Well it didn't...hubby asked me to stick to the plan for Feb 1, so I conceded.
He says it would be better if we quit together, and he wants to stick to the original plan.
I have cut my smoking down to 2 cigs per day now. I'm eager and ready.

BenMax
January 19th, 2010, 04:14 PM
LMPG - I have been smoking for 25 years now. The only time I quit and it 'could have been successful' was while I was pregnant 18 years ago. My X smoked at that time and after my daughter was born, I couldn't resist the smell. So back I went.

I have set this as my resolution for this year. I could not do it for a specific date, but for a year process. I have tried the patch, therapy, meds in the past and failed. This time I am consulting another doctor for somesort of med that has worked for others (sorry don't know the name). Unfortunately I currently have eczema and it is not recommended at this time. So I smoke and wait for this to clear.

I wish you luck with this as it is the right move in the right direction. I think us smokers need to find what works for us as individuals as there is no sure technique that is global.

On a side note - so many people cannot understand why I have no will power when I clearly am pretty much stable mentally. Truth is, I love to smoke. I really don't want to give it up but I know that I want to see my child grow into a woman. I am certain that if I put my mind to it seriously, I could do it. I just need to 'accept' the fact that I can never light up again...and it is this that keeps me hiding under the rug.

dollface
January 19th, 2010, 04:20 PM
2 a day is better than a pack :)! I think you will achieve this goal since you've done soo great already! :goodvibes:

Tommysmom
January 19th, 2010, 04:41 PM
Truth is, I love to smoke. I really don't want to give it up but I know that I want to see my child grow into a woman. I am certain that if I put my mind to it seriously, I could do it. I just need to 'accept' the fact that I can never light up again...and it is this that keeps me hiding under the rug.

This was absolutely, completely, positively true for me, too. It took me years to finally want to quit, as opposed to trying to quit but really wanting to smoke.

angeldogs
January 19th, 2010, 07:11 PM
Will power is the biggest thing and what is going to work for you.i quit cold turkey for 3 and half years.my buddy quit about 10 years ago.he was on the patch and always carried a smoke with him and no light.and would just hold it in his fingers well he was on his forklift when needed something between his fingers.and is still smoke free.when i quit i was real serious about my weightlifting.when a craving happens you can also try exercising to keep yourself busy till the craving passes

Good luck.

Cathy1
January 19th, 2010, 08:45 PM
Maybe they should do things like this all over.



Driven to Quit Challenge helps tobacco users turn their willpower into horsepower.



More than 200 people in Southwestern Ontario have already committed to quit smoking this March by registering for the fifth annual Driven to Quit Challenge with a chance to win a 2010 Ford Escape Hybrid and other prizes.

The Driven to Quit Challenge is designed to give daily smokers 19 and older an incentive to quit smoking or tobacco use. Smokers can enter the challenge, set a quit date no later than February 28 and, with the support of a buddy, prepare to go smoke-free for the month of March.

Entrants who are successfully smoke-free for the month of March have the chance to win a 2010 Ford Escape hybrid and one of two $5,000 vacation getaways. A $2,000 MasterCard gift card is exclusively reserved for one person in Southwestern Ontario. Prizes are generously sponsored by McNeil Consumer Healthcare.

People who register before January 31, 2010 will also be eligible for the early bird prize, a $1,000 MasterCard gift card. The registration deadline for The Driven to Quit Challenge is February 28, 2010.

To register for The Challenge, Ontarians aged 19 and over can download a registration form at www.DrivenToQuit.caor visit Oxford County Public Health at 410 Buller Street in Woodstock for a printed form.

Participants can contact Oxford County Public Health for more information at 519-539-9800 or 1-800-755-0394. Additional support is provided by the Canadian Cancer Society Smokers' Helpline at 1 877 513-5333 and www.SmokersHelpline.ca.

"This is a great time of year to quit smoking and stay tobacco free. The health benefits of quitting smoking start 20 minutes after the last cigarette," said Gerry Moniz, Tobacco Control Coordinator, Oxford County Public Health & Emergency Services

"Some people may need to make several attempts at quitting before they're successful, so we encourage all smokers and tobacco users in our community to show their drive to quit smoking this year. Find a support buddy, seek out additional support while trying to quit, and you can be a winner in this year's challenge by finally quitting tobacco," said Carol Bossenberry, Public Health Nurse, Oxford County Public Health & Emergency Services.

Luvmypitgirls
January 23rd, 2010, 03:12 PM
2 a day is better than a pack :)! I think you will achieve this goal since you've done soo great already! :goodvibes:

Thank you dollface, I truly appreciate the encouragement. I am limiting myself to 2 per day, it's been difficult the past couple days because we are dealing with a tough situation. My youngest son got his new wheelchair last Monday, and everything seemed fine, but then a couple days ago we noticed the back of his right leg was red in one spot. So we kept it wrapped and put a piece of foam under his one leg when he was in the chair. It was too late, a pressure sore, (which starts deep inside and works it's way to the surface), had already manifested itself. This morning I noticed blood on the floor, I looked at my son and could see the droplets coming from his leg. In a matter of a few hours, and against all the preventitive messures we took, the pressure sore blister appeared. It is approx 3inches across. We will be taking him to the hospital when hubby comes home from work today. Of course this is stressing me out big time, and God how I would love a smoke right now, but I'm resisting, sipping on cold water, just playing around on my son's laptop. If I can get thru this without increasing my 2 per day, I will be very happy with myself. I must admit, I've been a little bit on the testy side the past couple days, a bit snippy with hubby the kids and the dogs. Poor Jersey, she wanted to nuggle last night but I just didn't want to be smothered at the time and I snapped at her telling her "No go to bed, leave me alone", oh my Dog, the look on her face, I could tell I had hurt her feelings, I felt so bad. I went out on the deck to "breathe" for a few minutes, and when I came back in I laid down on the dog bed with her for 1/2 hour. She nearly licked my face clean off, so I knew she forgave me.

Frenchy
January 23rd, 2010, 03:37 PM
I'm so sorry about your son's injury :(

stay strong woman ! you can do this ! :thumbs up :goodvibes:

Luvmypitgirls
January 23rd, 2010, 04:09 PM
I'm so sorry about your son's injury :(

stay strong woman ! you can do this ! :thumbs up :goodvibes:

Awee thank you Frenchy, I can use the support right now. I feel like a complete piece of ***** right now, for not catching the pressure sore sooner.
We are very concious of pressure sores, we do full body searches on a regular basis, and he does nightly checks of his "private areas" with a handheld mirror every night. Unfortunately, this one managed to sneak in under the radar, and it happened so quickly.
Altho he's paralized from the waist down, he does have "spots" of feeling on his legs, and of course the inflammation is where he has some touch sensitivity.
This will seriously hamper his independence over the next few weeks. He will pretty much be a prisoner on the loveseat, as we have to keep the leg elevated a bit to let air at the wound. Of course I will do whatever it takes to keep him entertained and content, but this is going to be hard on him.
I've wrapped cloths around the part of the wheelchair that I believe has caused the issue so he can at least sit in it to use the washroom. The wheelchair guy is coming Monday morning to see what he can do to rectify the situation.
I should've been more on the ball....:(

Frenchy
January 23rd, 2010, 04:17 PM
I should've been more on the ball....:(

I don't think you could have :grouphug: I know a lady that's in a wheelchair and she always gets those :( had to be hospitalized more than once because of them.

budgrrl
January 23rd, 2010, 07:44 PM
2 is way better than a pack a day lmpg! good for you! you CAN do it!
i am sorry to hear you are going through such a stressful time :(
it sounds like you have a wonderful family - both human and furbabies!! the PERFECT reason to quit so you can live a long, healthy life :D

good luck to you! you can do it!!! :goodvibes:

14+kitties
January 23rd, 2010, 09:26 PM
Years ago I had heard of orange juice and cream of tarter being used to help with cravings. I tried it but only half heartedly so I can't say I gave it a fair shake. I did do a search because I couldn't remember the amount of cream of tarter you were supposed to add to your juice and managed to find a site......

Another natural remedy for quitting smoking can be found in your kitchen or grocery store. A combination of orange juice and cream of tartar is said to help flush nicotine from your system, thereby reducing your cravings for it. Your cravings should subside more each day as more nicotine is flushed from your body. Mix one half teaspoon of cream of tartar (found in the spice section of your local grocery) in a glass of orange juice, and drink it right before bed each night.

Read more: http://www.healthadel.com/kicking-the-nicotine-habit-the-all-natural-way-to-quit-smoking/#ixzz0dUq5c6O3

Please hang in there. You are doing wonderfully well!!! Take it one day at a time and soon you will find a lot of successive days have passed without inhaling that toxin into your system. :thumbs up

PS - just as an FYI - if you do a search please don't click on the natural home remedies site. It has a virus on it which AVG caught for me thankfully.

Luvmypitgirls
January 24th, 2010, 01:38 AM
I don't think you could have :grouphug: I know a lady that's in a wheelchair and she always gets those :( had to be hospitalized more than once because of them.

Jeffrey had one that required hospitalization once, it was shortly after they performed a girdlestone release, removing the balljoint of the hip. It completely changed the way he sits and he ended up with a pressure sore in his groin area, it was pretty bad. This one looks pretty bad too, I'm hoping it won't require hospitalization.

2 is way better than a pack a day lmpg! good for you! you CAN do it!
i am sorry to hear you are going through such a stressful time :(
it sounds like you have a wonderful family - both human and furbabies!! the PERFECT reason to quit so you can live a long, healthy life :D

good luck to you! you can do it!!! :goodvibes:

Thank you budgrrl, I am very determined to quit. My best friend quit 13 days ago, I figure if she can do it so can I! I think hubby will have a more difficult time than I will, but I'm hoping we can both be successful this time.

Years ago I had heard of orange juice and cream of tarter being used to help with cravings. I tried it but only half heartedly so I can't say I gave it a fair shake. I did do a search because I couldn't remember the amount of cream of tarter you were supposed to add to your juice and managed to find a site......

Another natural remedy for quitting smoking can be found in your kitchen or grocery store. A combination of orange juice and cream of tartar is said to help flush nicotine from your system, thereby reducing your cravings for it. Your cravings should subside more each day as more nicotine is flushed from your body. Mix one half teaspoon of cream of tartar (found in the spice section of your local grocery) in a glass of orange juice, and drink it right before bed each night.

Read more: http://www.healthadel.com/kicking-the-nicotine-habit-the-all-natural-way-to-quit-smoking/#ixzz0dUq5c6O3

Please hang in there. You are doing wonderfully well!!! Take it one day at a time and soon you will find a lot of successive days have passed without inhaling that toxin into your system. :thumbs up

PS - just as an FYI - if you do a search please don't click on the natural home remedies site. It has a virus on it which AVG caught for me thankfully.

I've never heard of that remedy before, but I am willing to try anything to succeed this time. I am an orange juice addict, I drink a litre of OJ per day, I gave up pop a couple months ago, unless I'm having the occassional drink like Rye and Coke , otherwise you won't see me with a pop can in my hand.
I have found sipping ice water slowly thru a straw really helps too.

dollface
January 24th, 2010, 10:40 PM
So sorry to hear about your son :( And try not to be too hard on yourself I'm sure you're the bestest M♥M :)

Dog Dancer
January 25th, 2010, 04:46 PM
Oh LMPG, please don't be so hard on yourself. You do so much as it is, and your son knows this. I'm sure you're being harder on yourself than he would like you to be. Things happen, and there's not much you can do about it. Glad the fellow will be out to try to fix the chair for your son. Here's hoping he recovers quickly without need of a hospitalization.

You are doing great. If you slide a wee bit, don't beat yourself up. You're only human. Stay true to the course long term and you will succeed. :grouphug:

Luvmypitgirls
January 25th, 2010, 05:36 PM
So sorry to hear about your son :( And try not to be too hard on yourself I'm sure you're the bestest M♥M :)

Not sure about being the bestest mom, but I certainly try. I'm overprotective of Jeffrey to a fault, when something goes wrong when it comes to him, I always feel extremely guilty...something I most certainly need to work on.

Oh LMPG, please don't be so hard on yourself. You do so much as it is, and your son knows this. I'm sure you're being harder on yourself than he would like you to be. Things happen, and there's not much you can do about it. Glad the fellow will be out to try to fix the chair for your son. Here's hoping he recovers quickly without need of a hospitalization.

You are doing great. If you slide a wee bit, don't beat yourself up. You're only human. Stay true to the course long term and you will succeed. :grouphug:

Thank you DD, I did slide a wee bit yesterday, I had two &1/2 ciggies yesterday, of course I beat myself up afterwards.... To make up for it, I have only had 1/2 a ciggy thus far today and it's 4:32 p.m. My goal is to not smoke the other half till much later tonight...if at all.
The guy came to look at Jeffreys wheelchair, he couldn't fix it because as it turns out, we will have to take it into the shop to have a couple metal tabs cut off. They are upholstery tabs that became exposed when they cut back the upolstery that his Roho cushion sits on, basically the fabric under his seat.
So Thursday we have an appt to get that taken care of, hopefully there won't be any further issue with the chair after that. Keepin' my fingers crossed.