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So, Tell Me About Canada

UTANRO
November 24th, 2009, 12:43 PM
I've always wanted to move to Canada, and for the last couple years have been researching things like different places, real estate, home prices, ect. I'd love to be able to move to Canada within the next 3 years, and within the next 1-2 years, take a trip up there and really start scouting area's out in person (I live in the southern US, so it'd be quite a trip). However, I still have no clue where I want to go, so it'd be really helpful if all you Canadian's told me a bit about the different area's, and the pro's and con's. :D

First, I originally always had my heart set on Vancouver. However, I've realized that the housing market there is extremely expensive. So my other place I had my heart set on was the Nova Scotia region.

In researching real estate in the Nova Scotia region, I realized that the property is SUPER cheap. I was finding house after house that's 4 bedrooms on like 10 acres of land for around $100,000.

I'm looking for something that's a little country, but within reasonable driving distance to a city. Something with land, like between 5-10 acres would be nice, for the dogs. Low crime is a BIGGIE. I want an area that's known for a relatively low crime rate.

So... tell me what area of Canada you live in, and tell me a bit about it.

How long have you lived there, what's the crime rate like, is it a safe area, and any other pro's and cons. What do you like about it, what do you not like about it, ect.

Thanks guys. :D

Love4himies
November 24th, 2009, 01:26 PM
Are you independently wealthy, retired or will you be working?

What are your hobbies/interests? Do you mind the cold? The cold damp? Do you prefer more sunshine?

There are really no super high crime areas in Canada, not like the States.

Melinda
November 24th, 2009, 01:36 PM
if when you retire and will be able to collect a pension from both countries, you'll need to live in an area close to a border so you can report there once a month to collect and sign for your pension.

Bailey_
November 24th, 2009, 01:44 PM
The thing about Nova Scotia and surrounding areas on the East Coast is that there is literally very little work. My family is out that way and the only one left is my retired grandfather and my uncle. Everyone else has travelled to Ontario or farther west (I'm in AB).

Ideally we would love to eventually live in Nova Scotia too. It's beautiful there - everywhere you go...but again, employment is the main concern.

I personally think Alberta is a wonderful province to live in. We have a lot of variety here as far as scenery is concerned (from flat plains, to mountains, to valleys, etc) and the cost of living is reasonable. Lots of employment. :D

aslan
November 24th, 2009, 02:01 PM
having been to alberta i have to disagree bailey, your cost of living is much higher than this side of the country. As for the east coast it would depend on what you do for a living whether or not there is jobs available. If you are retiring i would highly recommend the east coast, more land, housing is much cheaper. Newfoundland and Nova Scotia get more snow than Ontario by far but isn't as cold as it gets here.

UTANRO
November 24th, 2009, 02:10 PM
I have a friend in Ontario that's been telling me about the Ottawa and surrounding area.

As far as me: I'm relatively young (25), and will be working mostly in the health care field. I'm certified as a CNA, and will probably be going for my LPN and then RN eventually. Not a concrete plan, but likely the plan no less.

Given my age, I'm also obviously far from retirement age.

Also, I am FAR from indepently wealthy. Which is why Vancouver quickly became out of the question. I need an area with affordability.

I love the cold, but I don't want to be snowed in 8 months out of the year, which is why I do not want to go too far north into Canada. I love sunshine as well.

Hobbies or interests... I'd like somewhere close to a lake for fishing and photography. Nice country scenery and trails would be nice, somewhere where I can take the dogs for a nice hike (but not get lost in the wilderness, LOL).

But also semi close (within 20-30 minutes driving distance) to a city, where I can go shopping, have a veterinary clinic, doctor's office, grocery store, ect.

Melinda
November 24th, 2009, 02:15 PM
then our area would be perfect for you if you're in the health care, toronto has a high cost of living, ottawa is so so....I'm in Cornwall, an hour from ottawa and its gorgeous here, we only own 1/3 acre with a 4 bedroom home (older remodeled) and the value is 120,000. taxes just 2200/yr, 3000 per yr for heat/elec and I can spit out my front door into the usa *L* Massen NY. oh and as for crime rate *L* I've often come home from a day of shopping to find my friends waiting in my kitchen with the coffee on, I often forget to lock my doors and have never had any trouble

Marcha
November 24th, 2009, 02:18 PM
While the comparitive cost of living on Vancouver Island is pretty high, you may want to look at somewhere like Comox Valley, or even the Sooke or Port Renfrew area on Vancouver Island. Lots of nature, lots of space, great place for any outdoor activity, and out of the cities places get pretty rural and lots cheaper pretty quickly. Stay away from the immediate Greater Victoria area - that's the most pricey. But as soon as you go west or north of Vancouver, prices drop steadily.

Bailey_
November 24th, 2009, 02:20 PM
UTRANO - Both of my parents work for Capital Health here in AB and love it. My Dad is the fire marshal and coordinator for all of Northern AB. From what you're describing you're looking for, I have to again suggest Alberta...particularly Edmonton; especially if you are in healthcare. :thumbs up

aslan
November 24th, 2009, 02:21 PM
that's pretty much it, the closer to any of the cities you get the higher the prices.

i wasn't talking down east bailey, i'm in toronto.

JanM
November 24th, 2009, 02:23 PM
You are quite right - Vancouver real estate is sky high - but Vancouver Island is a different story altogether. Real estate in my area - between Nanaimo and Duncan is affordable - still more than the prairies though. There are more areas here to hike, fish, do almost any outdoor activity - than you could ever wish for.

The climate is more than acceptable - (not counting last winter which was highly unusual) - we get snow maybe twice a season and it normally lasts for a couple of days each time. The rain we are getting right now is, again, highly unusual, but we aren't shovelling it. Yes, some areas have flooded but those that did flood are on known flood plains.

Coming from Winnipeg, I really, really appreciate the temperate climate here and the ability to be outdoors all year.

I cannot speak about the working field though because I'm retired and don't pay any attention to the availability of jobs and such.

Bailey_
November 24th, 2009, 02:23 PM
i wasn't talking down east bailey, i'm in toronto.

:laughing: That IS East to me. ;)

BenMax
November 24th, 2009, 02:28 PM
I have lived in Alberta and that really was one of the nicest provinces I lived in. People are great, lots of land with homes on the outskirts of the city. But - it is a little costly. Quebec is probably one of the most economical provinces to live in but again the language barrier may be an issue. BC - well that is God's country - enough said. Ontario I must say is gorgeous. There are areas that are more expensive than others but I think it's the best of all worlds really. I think your profession will take you safely just about anywhere in Canada - except for Quebec unless you speak alittle French.

Canada in general is safe. There are higher crime rate areas more so than others but I do not think it is like the US. I travelled alot in the US for my job, and I was given a 'map of warning' from my clients. Here it is not like that unless I have my head in the sand.

Move now - what is taking you so long?

rainbow
November 24th, 2009, 02:31 PM
There are pros and cons for all places in Canada. :shrug:

Of course, BC can't be beat for scenery and the weather is not as extreme as alot of other areas :cloud9: :D and there are smaller places that are not ridiculously expensive yet. :rolleyes:

Since a job is the most important thing for you try checking some of these websites to see where most of the opportunities are for you and go from there ....

http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=cna+health+care+jobs+in+canada&btnG=Search&meta=&aq=f&oq=

UTANRO
November 24th, 2009, 02:37 PM
Thanks guys, love all the suggestions so far! I am writing down everything and researching the places y'all are mentioning.

BenMax, I'd so move now if I had the money. Still have to save for the trip, down payment, taxes, ect. But I can't wait until I finally do get there.

Rainbow, I know there's pro's and con's for all area's. Which is why I said, tell me where you live, and what's the pro's and con's for your specific area. :D

Love the advice so far guys, thanks a ton!

Bailey_
November 24th, 2009, 02:48 PM
The good thing is, it isn't as 'difficult' for you to move here than it would be for one of us Canucks to come to the states. :rolleyes:

Which brings me to my question; have you already applied for citizenship here?

14+kitties
November 24th, 2009, 03:04 PM
I love the cold, but I don't want to be snowed in 8 months out of the year, which is why I do not want to go too far north into Canada. I love sunshine as well.

:rolleyes: Me thinks you better do more research on Canada. We have snow all year round! And igloos too!! :p

Ok, I'll be serious now. :D You have to go pretttyy far up north to find a place where there is snow 8 months out of the year. We have the normal four seasons. In fact it is mid Nov and our area has only seen a few flakes of snow so far. By mid March at the latest the snow around here is gone. Some years we have a green Christmas too. We have a growing season from May 24 weekend till, for some plant varieties, the end of September. We can have some freaky weather but so can the States.

You may want to evaluate the reasons you want to move to Canada. Unfortunately nursing is one of the careers that is suffering due to cutbacks. Unless you want to work in a nursing home dealing with our ever increasing aging population jobs may be a premium. Of course other areas of Canada may be different. I know the nurses I am acquainted with are always saying they are overworked, underpaid, and tired from having too many patients to care for. Not enough nurses to go around and with cutbacks no sign of it changing.
My son in law is from the States. He moved here to be with my daughter (obviously) but works in the computer field. There always seems to be jobs available for good IT folks.
I live near Niagara Falls. Approx 25 min away. We have 19 acres. Most of it in bush. Lots of deer, wildlife. We are close to two major cities - Hamilton and St Catharines. The town I live near is five minutes from me. There is numerous small towns around with lots of vets.
I used to live in Owen Sound. It is a smallish place but is designated a "city" because it's the biggest place in the area. It is surrounded by tourist area. There is lots of shopping but again, the nursing situation is not great. It is three hours north of where I am now.
I bet now you are even more confused, huh? :D

edit: Should also add real estate prices vary greatly from good to outrageous all in an hour's drive.

rainbow
November 24th, 2009, 03:06 PM
Rainbow, I know there's pro's and con's for all area's. Which is why I said, tell me where you live, and what's the pro's and con's for your specific area. :D


LOL ....well BC is the most beautiful place in Canada and only has one con ....the high real estate prices but that is mainly Vancouver, Victoria and some of the larger towns like Kelowna.

dartfrog
November 24th, 2009, 03:08 PM
I would also recommend Vancouver Island (especially if you wanted to live in Vancouver; its just a ferry ride away for trips!) there are a ton of places here that would fit your bill here is the Vancouver Island health authorities website http://www.viha.ca/ they post most jobs on there (I’m not up on the lingo but I presume you would want to work at a hospital??). a few nice places (and not outrageously expensive) are places like Ladysmith, Sooke, Courtney, Campbell River, Erington… if you did come to check out the Island you can go from one end to the other in 8 hours so it would be completely doable to check it all out in one trip.

Marcha
November 24th, 2009, 03:10 PM
A friend of mine is a nurse - she lived and worked in Edmonton for decades and is now working in Victoria, and living west outside the Greater Victoria area. If you want, I can ask her if she'd be willing to discuss nursing options, housing and living prices in Victoria and Edmonton?

rainbow
November 24th, 2009, 03:10 PM
I agree with 14+kitties about the jobs in health care ....I think pretty much all the provinces have had huge cutbacks. :sad:

That's whay I posted the website for you to check out what's available since a job is your biggest concern imo. :)

Marcha
November 24th, 2009, 03:11 PM
Heehee! The Van Islers are coming out in this thread!

rainbow
November 24th, 2009, 03:14 PM
One more thing you are going to have to consider is the dog limit everywhere. I don't think there is one where I live just outside of Castlegar BC but there probably is one inside the town's boundaries.

SolaMio
November 24th, 2009, 03:38 PM
LOL ....well BC is the most beautiful place in Canada and only has one con ....the high real estate prices but that is mainly Vancouver, Victoria and some of the larger towns like Kelowna.

*cough, cough* says the lone Cape Bretoner on the board... I dare say we rival BC's beauty on this island if I do say so myself :D

Depending on someone's reasons for moving here,

pros:
-VERY low cost of living (you can find a really nice house in CBRM for less than 120K)
-beautiful scenery (voted one of the top tourist destinations in the world)
-lots of outdoor stuff to do (camping, skiing, diving, etc.)
-good medical facilities (fairly new hospital, new services)
-local university (CBU) and community college
-new dog park!

cons:
-high unemployment
-you have to really search out stuff to do in CBRM (culturally), it won't come to you
-the tar ponds (google it, ugh)

Most of my friends now are "come from away-ers" :laughing: ... you either love it or hate it here. But those who love it, REALLY love it.

If you don't live here though it's a great place to visit! http://cbisland.com/index2.php

Bailey_
November 24th, 2009, 03:42 PM
SolaMio - I agree with you - Nova Scotia certainly rivals the west coast for beauty. My family lives in Glace Bay. I am incredibly fond of Cape Breton...:cloud9: Miss it all the time!

SolaMio
November 24th, 2009, 03:45 PM
I think half of Calgary's population is or was Cape Bretoners :laughing:

That's where all my girlfriends moved... Six months after I moved "back home". Do I smell? :eeew:

:laughing:

Bailey_
November 24th, 2009, 03:47 PM
:laughing: Very true...I know a TON of people from NS that moved to AB.

If only the employment rate was better:shrug:...I bet you a LOT would go back!

mollywog
November 24th, 2009, 04:23 PM
Utanro, You have come to the right place. Our Pets.ca members live all over the place!!! I do have one question for you- how many dogs would you be bringing with you???
I live in Sioux Lookout (Google it, it's basically in the smack-dab centre of Canada). It's in the province of Ontario. We experience all 4 seasons in their glory, this is a small town with low crime rates, and there are hundreds of lakes at our doorstep- my husband is a fishing guide here! A new hospital is being built in the community and there are definitely jobs up here, mostly serving the First Nations Peoples. The cost of living is relatively low. The only downfall is that you are a one hour drive away from WalMart!! :laughing:
I would have to agree about BC and Alberta being expensive. The east coast is gorgeous, and cheaper as well.
Good luck, it won't be an easy decision!!

UTANRO
November 24th, 2009, 04:31 PM
Wow, great stuff guys. :D

While health care is what I am certified in, I've worked in nursing homes and a hospital. However, it's not concrete that I'll stay doing that. I've considering going back and getting an associates in computer programming. I've did the most work as a veterinary technician, however the state I live doesn't require certification. So, it'll be a bit useless with no cert'd when I move.

I haven't applied for any type of citizenship, or anything like that. At this point, it's in the beginning phases of just looking at all area's of Canada, and will eventually narrow down specific area's to visit within the next year or two.

There will be many things that will be checked into, like the limit on dogs (there will have to be no limit), and BSL. I know Ontario has their famous BSL law. While the no pit bull thing isn't a problem right now, I have owned a pit bull, I have fostered pit bulls, and I would reaaaallllyyyy like to not settle down somewhere that doesn't allow me to ever own a pit or pit mix.

But right now, I'm at the beginning of the "looking" phase, getting a general idea of the area's around Canada, their pro's and con's, so that over the next year I can start to graph out which area's I will be visiting to get a better idea of stuff.

UTANRO
November 24th, 2009, 04:33 PM
Hi Molly! I will likely be bringing all 15, but can't guarantee it. A couple are in ailing health, so I can't guarantee that they'll be with us when the move comes in 3 or so years. However, like I said, wherever I move has to have no pet limit. That's an absolute must. Where I live now is out in the country, in a tiny town, and there's no limit on how many dogs we can have.

Love4himies
November 24th, 2009, 04:42 PM
Well I have lived in all parts of Canada. Do your research, contact immigration and when you decide on a province, contact the licensing board to find out what you need to be employed as a nurse in that province.

You would have to go pretty much to the north pole for snow 8 months out of the year. :laughing:

The weather can affect a lot of people. If you are a sunshine person, the coasts and pretty much all of Ontario is out. There is a huge difference between the cold in Ontario and Alberta at the same temperature due to the humidity level.

BenMax is right, Quebec is economical. Alberta and BC are expensive to live. Eastern Ontario is reasonable.

My first choice to live would be Alberta and second BC. I lived in both places and think they can't be beat. :thumbs up

Marcha
November 24th, 2009, 06:31 PM
Yes, the coast here is temperate rain forest, and while we get less rain on Vancouver Island than Seattle (just south of here), there are significantly less hours of sunshine than for instance in Edmonton. Edmonton temperatures in winter can get pretty frosty, but it's crisp and sunny. Over here (Vancouver Island), the winters can be very dreary (grey, overcast, rainy, fog). So you'll need to think what you want weather-wise. If you have any kind of seasonal affective disorder (if your well-being is dependent on weather), you'll need to consider the rain in the rain forest, or very deep cold with not so much snow, or lots of snow, etc.

One thing we'd like to do in the next few years, is see as much of Canada as we can by taking the Trans Canada train from East to West. We moved to Canada 11 years ago in January, and we've not been further east than Vancouver. So we have LOTS to see!

quincymycat
November 24th, 2009, 07:02 PM
UTANRO. will you be completing your nursing education in the US or Canada? You are aware the CN will require current registration in what ever province you choose to locate to..I am what can be considered a retired RN in Ontario and there is lots of work, but the work you will likely find will be part time - that is the hospitals will not be required to provide benefits to you. Many nurses right now work at a a couple of hospitals to get sufficient hours to maintain life. I also understand the standard for new nurses now is a BScN, which depending on your plans for training should be a consideration when planning to come here.
You could look into the practical nursing area - LPN - there is always need for them and you may be more succesful in obtaining full time work. If you are inclined to go to a rural area, full time work will be waiting for you big time as either an RN or LPN. In fact, if you advise immigration your choice of employment is rural areas, you will likely be granted admission immediately. After you serve your time there, you will be free to look to other areas more to your liking.
Good luck with your future plans.

luckypenny
November 24th, 2009, 08:08 PM
Culture, big cities, both alpine and cross country skiing, boating, camping, bicycle paths that will take you right across the province, lakes, rivers, ocean, mountains, forest, farm land, winter carnivals, festivals, casinos, les Canadiens de Montreal, poutine and maple syrup....Quebec has it all :D.

No shortage of nursing jobs here in Quebec, that's for sure. You'll be overworked in no time :D.

If language is an issue, French courses are free for immigrants (those of born here and who need courses have to pay for it :rolleyes:). Or there's work in private nursing homes where, in some places, language is not so much an issue.

About 4 years ago, a friend of ours was working as a nurses aid (auxiliary nurse I think it's called?) and her starting salary was 21$ an hour. Not sure how that compares elsewhere in Canada.

We live 40 minutes from Montreal (outside of rush hour) on the South Shore. I can see the island from just up the road :cool: yet live in the country :cloud9:. Last time I checked, you can still find a decent, medium size house around here on a minimum of 1 acre of land for under 250K. Drive out another 20 minutes or so and you can knock off up to 100K from the prices. Large suburban cities nearby (max 10 minutes away) as well so lots of vets, shopping, etc.

Most agriculture zones have no dog limits :thumbs up. As for BSL though, I think Quebec learned from the experience in Ontario. Rather than instilling a province-wide ban, individual municipalities are sneaking in Pitbull bans without many residents even knowing about it :mad:. I was told however, that if neighbors don't have founded complaints, the dogs and owners are left alone but always better to check beforehand.

http://www.bonjourquebec.com/qc-en/activites0.html

Dee-O-Gee
November 24th, 2009, 08:33 PM
:rolleyes: Me thinks you better do more research on Canada. We have snow all year round! And igloos too!! :p

[B]14+...you forgot to mention the huskies, snowshoes & dog sleds! :D:D Just kidding! :)


I live near Niagara Falls. Approx 25 min away. We have 19 acres. Most of it in bush. Lots of deer, wildlife. We are close to two major cities - Hamilton and St Catharines. The town I live near is five minutes from me. There is numerous small towns around with lots of vets.
There is lots of shopping but again, the nursing situation is not great. It is three hours north of where I am now.
I bet now you are even more confused, huh? :D

edit: Should also add real estate prices vary greatly from good to outrageous all in an hour's drive.

14+ is right. I too live near Niagara Falls, Ontario, actually I live more in the snow belt area of Buffalo, NY--a stone throw away. If you do need to report between Canada/U.S., then a border situation may be the right path. Housing prices in this area are reasonable and the city of Toronto is about an 1 1/2 drive away. Health care right now in the Province of Ontario is a touchy subject. Either you love it or hate it? :shrug:

In any event, we get all 4 seasons. If you like snow, cold and damp then Canada would welcome you with open arms! :)

Frenchy
November 24th, 2009, 08:41 PM
Last time I checked, you can still find a decent, medium size house around here on a minimum of 1 acre of land for under 250K. Drive out another 20 minutes or so and you can knock off up to 100K from the prices. Large suburban cities nearby (max 10 minutes away) as well so lots of vets, shopping, etc.



Last time you checked LP ? When was that ? 1980 ? :laughing:

LP , in St-Philippe , the only thing you can get for let's say $200 000.00 is a mobile home with maximum 7 000 sqf of land ! 20 minutes more is in my area and it's not much better , I know , I've been shopping around :frustrated:

and she would have to like snow ..... cold ..... ice .....

luckypenny
November 24th, 2009, 08:44 PM
Last time you checked LP ? When was that ? 1980 ? :laughing:

LP , in St-Philippe , the only thing you can get for let's say $200 000.00 is a mobile home with maximum 7 000 sqf of land ! 20 minutes more is in my area and it's not much better , I know , I've been shopping around :frustrated:

and she would have to like snow ..... cold ..... ice .....

:p

A few houses up the road from here...stone exterior, 3 bedroom, ceramic tiles and hardwood floors, sun room, 35 000 sq. ft. sold for 215 000$ a couple of months ago.

Frenchy
November 24th, 2009, 08:52 PM
:p

A few houses up the road from here...stone exterior, 3 bedroom, ceramic tiles and hardwood floors, sun room, 35 000 sq. ft. sold for 215 000$ a couple of months ago.


Must had been something wrong with it , really ! I can't believe I've seen mobile homes for $200 000 and + :eek: there freaking mobile homes !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :yell:

I would love to move there , would be so much more convenient , close to work and everything else.

sorry for the off topic :o

hazelrunpack
November 24th, 2009, 09:22 PM
Sounds like you've been looking in the wrong places, Frenchy! You should hire LP to take you around! :p

Frenchy
November 24th, 2009, 09:28 PM
Sounds like you've been looking in the wrong places, Frenchy! You should hire LP to take you around! :p

Not really , I'm on mls.ca everyday and I drive around every Sundays. LP"s area is very expensive because it's country but very near the city. :shrug: I can't afford a $200 000 mortgage , and would never pay that amount for a trailer home !

lUvMyLaB<3
November 24th, 2009, 10:11 PM
Lol! Well you can see how much we love canada! Love the excuse to talk about it. I am in manitoba, smack in the middle! I can tell you it is very possible to have snow for 8 months here! It often snows mid oct, and stays until april or may, always snow from nov to april, anyway, it isnt the snow, its the cold, -40's are so common for 4 months. However we have been bringing nurses from the phillapines to fill jobs at hospitals, so you would be more than welcome! I too disagree with bailey, as the cola is high in alberta, however, jobs pay more as a rule so it all works out. Personaly, i think there is nothing more beautiful than the prairies, our parks are breathtaking. Your dogs would be fine outside the city, or a small town, where living is cheaper anyway, there is no shortage of farms and acearages here! Think we have more than the rest of the country! Good luck with your venture, i hope you find exactly what you are looking for!

I cant help but to ask, . . .why Canada??

14+kitties
November 24th, 2009, 10:45 PM
14+...you forgot to mention the huskies, snowshoes & dog sleds! Just kidding!


I know. I didn't mention the moose or polar bears wandering our streets or the fact that our favourite word is "eh" or that we all love hockey so much that Canada is practically shut down if there is a game on TV. Everyone is watching it. :rolleyes: And we also spell some words differently because we use the English spelling. Actually that one is true. :D

I love the misconceptions some people from other countries have about us. They are usually a source of much amusement.

Marcha
November 24th, 2009, 11:14 PM
Dh and I came to Canada 11 years ago from Europe (the UK and the Netherlands respectively). I had looked up Victoria on the internet (Google wasn't invented yet), and I had looked it up on a map. But I looked up LAKE Victoria (in Quebec), so all that did was convince me that Canada was snow, ice and igloos, and that it was going to be freeezing. Bought myself a sheepskin coat, that wouldn't look out of place in a spaghetti western :rolleyes: , some sheepskin lined boots, and was sure I could handle it. :loser:

It was January. We flew to Vancouver, took the ferry to Victoria, and dayum!! Mudslides in Nanaimo. Rain, rain, rain. And even though my ridiculous sheepskin wouldn't have even begun to keep me warm in Northern Quebec, I was sweltering in it on the island.

Silly Europeans. :crazy:

And still, after all this time here, I have family members who are convinced that I live in snow and deep frost for months on end.

Um, no. We had more snow in Holland. :laughing: I remember the mornings where I could literally skate to work over the black ice on the road. Or that my deodorant was frozen in the bathroom. But here? In the Greater Victoria area, if there's even a single snowflake, people run inside to huddle around the radio. Schools and shops close. Life comes to a grinding halt because people here don't know what to do with snow. It's fantastic! :clown:

But all that said (and some of it tongue in cheek), there's nowhere else we want to be. Vancouver Island is our personal paradise. :cloud9:

Chris21711
November 25th, 2009, 08:54 AM
Which brings me to my question; have you already applied for citizenship here?

You have to live here with Landed Resident Status for 3 years before you can apply for citizenship Bailey.

One more thing you are going to have to consider is the dog limit everywhere. I don't think there is one where I live just outside of Castlegar BC but there probably is one inside the town's boundaries.

I thought you lived in Castlebud :cool:

We like Marcha are European (English and Spanish). We live about 45mins from Toronto. We have been living here for 35 years and cannot imagine returning to Europe to live (tad too late now anyway). I hate the winter, but I have been told that it really isn't that bad :rolleyes:....we pay high taxes, never lock my van doors when I shop, never lock the back door to my house. All in all we love it and have FREE healthcare to boot, which obviously comes via the taxes we pay.

Most important of all, we have a TIMMIES on every corner.

JanM
November 25th, 2009, 09:24 AM
[QUOTE=mollywog;853320]Utanro, You have come to the right place. Our Pets.ca members live all over the place!!! I do have one question for you- how many dogs would you be bringing with you???
I live in Sioux Lookout (Google it, it's basically in the smack-dab centre of

Egad - I don't want to hijack this thread but I used to live in Sioux Lookout - WOW! Is the post office still as weatherbeaten as it was, what, 40 years ago when I was there?????????

Writing4Fun
November 25th, 2009, 09:38 AM
I live about an hour north of Toronto. Plenty of small communities where you can get decent housing on decent parcels of land without having to win the lottery first. All within about a half-hour to 45 minute drive from Barrie, where you have ALL of the amenities. :thumbs up Lots of hospitals, private clinics, long-term care facilities if you're in that field of work. We also have protected forests with trails and all sorts of wildlife. We get about the same type of weather & amount of snow as Montreal/Ottawa, so it's not unbearable. Crime rates are very low around here ... mostly in the city core, and even then it's usually a handful of domestic disturbances or drunken disorderlies on a Saturday night. :rolleyes:

Luvmypitgirls
November 25th, 2009, 12:39 PM
Alberta, is very Pitbull friendly! However certain parts of Alberta, have BSL, like Edmonton for example, if you own a bully breed, it must be kept so many feet away from neighboring fences blah blah blah. Certainly not as restricting as Ontario, but it's still a form of BSL.

Calgary is expensive but not as expensive as 2 yrs ago when it comes to housing prices.
There are many wonderful surrounding areas to Calgary for example High River. Housing prices are affordable, the scenery is amazing, I can view the mountain ridge from my back deck, I am surrounded by fields which is frequented by lots and lots of wildlife.

Red Deer which is North of Calgary, is a small city about a 1 hour drive from Calgary.

Airdrie, one of the fastest growing communities in Alberta (which is why I moved away from there, it lost it's small town feeling) but is only 15 min North of Calgary.

However, with the exception of Calgary, most towns, cities and municipalities have dog limits. MD of Rockyview (Airdrie) it is a strict three dog limit.
High River,(Foothills municipality) is a three dog limit (even tho I have 4).
We actually looked at property in Black Diamond, but they are worse with a 2 dog limit.

There are many other wonderful areas in Southern Alberta, Nanton, Okotoks, Fort McLeod, Lethbridge which is close to the border.

Love4himies
November 25th, 2009, 12:48 PM
Alberta, is very Pitbull friendly! However certain parts of Alberta, have BSL, like Edmonton for example, if you own a bully breed, it must be kept so many feet away from neighboring fences blah blah blah. Certainly not as restricting as Ontario, but it's still a form of BSL.

Calgary is expensive but not as expensive as 2 yrs ago when it comes to housing prices.
There are many wonderful surrounding areas to Calgary for example High River. Housing prices are affordable, the scenery is amazing, I can view the mountain ridge from my back deck, I am surrounded by fields which is frequented by lots and lots of wildlife.

Red Deer which is North of Calgary, is a small city about a 1 hour drive from Calgary.

Airdrie, one of the fastest growing communities in Alberta (which is why I moved away from there, it lost it's small town feeling) but is only 15 min North of Calgary.

However, with the exception of Calgary, most towns, cities and municipalities have dog limits. MD of Rockyview (Airdrie) it is a strict three dog limit.
High River,(Foothills municipality) is a three dog limit (even tho I have 4).
We actually looked at property in Black Diamond, but they are worse with a 2 dog limit.

There are many other wonderful areas in Southern Alberta, Nanton, Okotoks, Fort McLeod, Lethbridge which is close to the border.


Maybe we should link some of Rickc's threads for her to view southern AB? :lovestruck:

Love4himies
November 25th, 2009, 12:54 PM
Lol! Well you can see how much we love canada! Love the excuse to talk about it. I am in manitoba, smack in the middle! I can tell you it is very possible to have snow for 8 months here! It often snows mid oct, and stays until april or may, always snow from nov to april, anyway, it isnt the snow, its the cold, -40's are so common for 4 months. However we have been bringing nurses from the phillapines to fill jobs at hospitals, so you would be more than welcome! I too disagree with bailey, as the cola is high in alberta, however, jobs pay more as a rule so it all works out. Personaly, i think there is nothing more beautiful than the prairies, our parks are breathtaking. Your dogs would be fine outside the city, or a small town, where living is cheaper anyway, there is no shortage of farms and acearages here! Think we have more than the rest of the country! Good luck with your venture, i hope you find exactly what you are looking for!

I cant help but to ask, . . .why Canada??

I have lived in Winterpeg, whoops I mean Winnipeg and I didn't find the feeling of the cold any different than Kingston Ontario. Yeah, maybe you have the snow for a longer period of time, but I would pick snow on the ground @-10 and sunny, then +3 and raining like it is here in Kingston. The damp cold really gets to my bones :yell:.

Love4himies
November 25th, 2009, 12:56 PM
14+...you forgot to mention the huskies, snowshoes & dog sleds! Just kidding!


I know. I didn't mention the moose or polar bears wandering our streets or the fact that our favourite word is "eh" or that we all love hockey so much that Canada is practically shut down if there is a game on TV. Everyone is watching it. :rolleyes: And we also spell some words differently because we use the English spelling. Actually that one is true. :D

I love the misconceptions some people from other countries have about us. They are usually a source of much amusement.


:laughing::laughing::laughing:

sugarcatmom
November 25th, 2009, 01:29 PM
On the "pro" side for Alberta: hardly any fleas (I've never dealt with them, nor has anyone I know), no heartworm and no Lyme disease. :thumbs up

edwina
November 25th, 2009, 01:45 PM
14+...you forgot to mention the huskies, snowshoes & dog sleds! Just kidding!


I know. I didn't mention the moose or polar bears wandering our streets or the fact that our favourite word is "eh" or that we all love hockey so much that Canada is practically shut down if there is a game on TV. Everyone is watching it. :rolleyes: And we also spell some words differently because we use the English spelling. Actually that one is true. :D

I love the misconceptions some people from other countries have about us. They are usually a source of much amusement.
People have misconceptions about the US also. Really i think most people of the world have a lot in common, its just there governments that make them look bad. :sad:
I wouldnt mind living in canada, but i wouldnt be able to handle the cold :o, i can barely stand the winters in pennsylvania. I am a warm weathered girl. :rolleyes: I have been to toronto, which i loved, very clean for a city. :thumbs up
Chris what does landed residence status mean exactly ? :confused:

Chris21711
November 25th, 2009, 01:59 PM
Chris what does landed residence status mean exactly ? :confused:

That you have applied to emigrate to Canada from outside of the country and been approved as a legal immigrant.....Although under some programs pf migrant workers ie "Nannies" they can apply after two years from within Canada and may or may not be accepted.

Marcha
November 25th, 2009, 03:18 PM
Here's a link to the government information about landed status, aka permanent residency status:

http://www.cic.gc.ca/ENGLISH/newcomers/about-pr.asp

It's a very costly process, unless your employer pays for the application and such. Involves lawyers and medical tests, so it can become quite a costly deal if you have to pay for it yourself. We were lucky that dh's employer paid for it. Took almost 2 years to get from a work visa to a permanent residency status, even though we started on it the moment we arrived.

On a work visa, you need to pay for your own health insurance if your employer doesn't offer benefits (and if you're working in health care, you're often on a part-time basis so that they don't have to give you benefits). On a permanent residency, you can get national health insurance basic coverage. Might be something else to consider when you're applying for work.

Love4himies
November 25th, 2009, 05:01 PM
On the "pro" side for Alberta: hardly any fleas (I've never dealt with them, nor has anyone I know), no heartworm and no Lyme disease. :thumbs up

I never had a flea during my 7 years there either. :thumbs up

rainbow
November 25th, 2009, 07:13 PM
On the "pro" side for Alberta: hardly any fleas (I've never dealt with them, nor has anyone I know), no heartworm and no Lyme disease. :thumbs up

That's the same as here in the Kootenays. :thumbs up

Equla
November 25th, 2009, 07:39 PM
I spent a summer in Vancouver and it can't be beat as far as things to do and the countryside is amazing. If you have ever been to Washington state, you get an idea of what it looks like.

You don't need (or want) a car in Vancouver. The bus system is more than adequate. It runs totally on power, so it doesn't smell bad (takes a little getting used to the power lines everywhere though). In Las Vegas, you don't want to ride the bus because it is always late and is full of undesirables, but Vancouver was refreshing. You are riding with businessmen and little old ladies.

The whole city is so dog friendly they have a committee within the government whose whole job is to come up with more ways they can make the city more dog friendly. I took my chi everywhere I went. She was welcome on the buses (in a carrier) and the aqua buses (little boats) and even the restaurants that had patio seating. Everywhere I went, I saw a dog.

My heart is really in Vancouver, but I could never get citizenship. There is an online test that you can take to see if you qualify to be a citizen. Unfortunately, the way Canada seems to run (from a US perspective) you have to have an occupation they need to get bumped up in line. For instance, if they have plenty of doctors, but lack mechanics, the mechanic will get in before the doctor.

The test asks your age, occupation, money info, etc. You get deducted points for being older than a certain age and get points for being educated beyond a certain amount. You also get points for being in certain career fields and if you can sustain yourself financially (i.e. money in the bank).

Frenchy
November 25th, 2009, 09:06 PM
On the "pro" side for Alberta: hardly any fleas (I've never dealt with them, nor has anyone I know), no heartworm and no Lyme disease. :thumbs up

Of course , because it's much too cold :D

sugarcatmom
November 25th, 2009, 10:15 PM
Of course , because it's much too cold :D

I do believe we were warmer than you guys today... +14 degrees http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-taunt002.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)

Oh ya, another one for the pro-Alberta (specifically, southern AB) column: CHINOOKS!!!!

Chris21711
November 26th, 2009, 09:11 AM
Here's a link to the government information about landed status, aka permanent residency status:

http://www.cic.gc.ca/ENGLISH/newcomers/about-pr.asp

It's a very costly process, unless your employer pays for the application and such. Involves lawyers and medical tests, so it can become quite a costly deal if you have to pay for it yourself. We were lucky that dh's employer paid for it. Took almost 2 years to get from a work visa to a permanent residency status, even though we started on it the moment we arrived.

When we came Marcha, you didn't have to pay for anything at all, but I know that has all changed now.

On a work visa, you need to pay for your own health insurance if your employer doesn't offer benefits (and if you're working in health care, you're often on a part-time basis so that they don't have to give you benefits). On a permanent residency, you can get national health insurance basic coverage. Might be something else to consider when you're applying for work.

Health coverage depends upon which Province you choose to live in...in Ontario on a work visa, you only need to be here 3 months before OHIP kicks in.