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Woohoo!! Declawing banned in California cities

sugarcatmom
November 9th, 2009, 10:51 AM
Los Angeles, San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica.....

Now if only Canada and the rest of North America could be so civilized.

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-declaw-cats7-2009nov07,0,4016163.story?track=rss

Love4himies
November 9th, 2009, 11:10 AM
I heard that on the radio, I was ecstatic!!!! :thumbs up :highfive:

ancientgirl
November 9th, 2009, 01:27 PM
Why would any vet be for declawing is beyond me.

I found this statement interesting:

"If it comes down to a cat being euthanized, losing its home or losing its claws," said association president Mark Nunez, "being euthanized or losing its home is a worse outcome."


So, what happens when you declaw a cat, and they become MORE destructive, because 1. they are in constant pain, regardless of pain medication and 2, because you have taken away any means of self defense? They get left at rescues and some euthanized because of behavior problems.

I good friend of mine who lives in Michigan was telling me about a cat her mother had not long ago who she had declawed. She said they had to euthanize it, because it bit her son when he was trying to get it from under the bed.

I said to her, "If were scared, and someone had taken away your knife or gun, and all you had to defend yourself was your teeth, wouldn't you use them?" She said yes, then it dawned on her, why the cat had become so agressive after she was declawed. :frustrated:

Love4himies
November 9th, 2009, 01:45 PM
Because it is income to them, AG :evil:, it's the almighty $$$$.

Do they pull dog's teeth out if a dog is a chewer and ruins furniture? No, they don't. If people value their furniture so much, they should get a stuffed cat that they can place nice and neatly on their couch :frustrated:.

I have never had a cat ruin a piece of furniture. Even with all the foster kittens I have had in my house. They have ruined curtains so now I buy the $9 ones from Jysk :laughing:.

rainbow
November 9th, 2009, 02:45 PM
We have a $400 scratching post in the rec room downstairs ....I think I only sat in it a couple of times before they destroyed it but I would still never ever consider getting a cat declawed. :eek:

YAY for California. :thumbs up

I am going to copy that link scm posted and send it out in an email and hopefully it will eventually reach lots of people that will start demanding that this be done everywhere. :fingerscr

sugarcatmom
November 9th, 2009, 06:00 PM
Here is a great article by Dr. Jean Hofve, who is a big voice in the anti-declaw movement. It dispells many of the myths touted around by those who think declawing is a reasonable option (such as the one ancientgirl pointed out from CVMA president Mark Nunez).

http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=declawingandscienceasummaryofthefacts

Love4himies
November 9th, 2009, 06:22 PM
Great article, SCM, thanks for sharing.

marko
November 10th, 2009, 11:32 AM
Yup a very good article - thanks for sharing and i 'tweeted' it!

Equla
November 17th, 2009, 07:51 PM
I was raised in a declaw family, but changed my tune when one of my declawed cats slipped out the doggy door and never came back. It kills me to think I took away her only means of protection.

I volunteer full-time at a rescue. There is an old girl there who is front AND back declawed. I didn't even think that was ever done and can't imagine why anyone would feel the need to remove the rear claws... and I was raised touting the pros of declawing our cats. The poor girl is pretty much unadoptable and is doomed to live out her days at the shelter (no-kill).

Honestly, mutilation aside, you can't ever know how your life will be 10 years from now. I don't agree that any animal should be dropped at a shelter ever, but it's worse when they are senior. Even so, people give up animals for a variety of reasons and declawing is something that could hurt their temperament later on.

We have 3 delightful kitties that have destroyed every piece of furniture we own. Having 2 large dogs as well means we stopped buying expensive furniture years ago. We just buy secondhand and then we don't care if it gets a little torn up. Oh well... If it wasn't the cats clawing them, it would be the kids spilling kool-aid on them. :shrug:

p.s. They have a killer cat tree... they LOVE sleeping on it. Don't really care to claw it. Once again... oh well.

Love4himies
November 18th, 2009, 08:10 AM
I was raised in a declaw family, but changed my tune when one of my declawed cats slipped out the doggy door and never came back. It kills me to think I took away her only means of protection.

I volunteer full-time at a rescue. There is an old girl there who is front AND back declawed. I didn't even think that was ever done and can't imagine why anyone would feel the need to remove the rear claws... and I was raised touting the pros of declawing our cats. The poor girl is pretty much unadoptable and is doomed to live out her days at the shelter (no-kill).

Honestly, mutilation aside, you can't ever know how your life will be 10 years from now. I don't agree that any animal should be dropped at a shelter ever, but it's worse when they are senior. Even so, people give up animals for a variety of reasons and declawing is something that could hurt their temperament later on.

We have 3 delightful kitties that have destroyed every piece of furniture we own. Having 2 large dogs as well means we stopped buying expensive furniture years ago. We just buy secondhand and then we don't care if it gets a little torn up. Oh well... If it wasn't the cats clawing them, it would be the kids spilling kool-aid on them. :shrug:

p.s. They have a killer cat tree... they LOVE sleeping on it. Don't really care to claw it. Once again... oh well.

Now that is my kind of cat owner :thumbs up

I have never had any of my cats tear up my furniture, they have always used their stands or when I walk them outside, use a tree.

Melei'sMom
November 19th, 2009, 03:57 PM
The first article was thrilling to read, way to go california!, but the second was even more interesting.

I have one question about the last line of the article and hoping someone here can explain it to me...

Only medical need for the good of the cat—not the sofa—justifies the stress and pain of declawing and its aftermath. Yet as the situation stands, veterinarians are clearly incapable of regulating themselves and following well-established guidelines. Therefore, an ordinance banning declawing is appropriate, necessary, and humane.

What would be the medical need that would require the cat to be declawed?? I can't think of any reason that a cat's health would require declawing and am wondering if anyone knows of one, cause that confuses me.

Equla
November 19th, 2009, 05:04 PM
Just off the top of my head, probably something like ingrown toe-nails on a human. If there was an abnormality with the claws that would cripple the cat, then it would be a legitimate medical necessity.

I don't think they have anything in particular in mind when they wrote the law that way. Probably just don't want to rule it out completely in case there is a reason to have it done that the cat would benefit from. Kind of like if we were to ever outlaw abortion. The law would still need to have a clause in it to allow for life-saving abortions. Possibly illness that's caused by the pregnancy, major birth defects, or something of that nature.

chico2
November 19th, 2009, 05:23 PM
To be honest,my cats(not these ones I have now) have destroyed quite a few things,but a long time ago we smartened up,no more drapes,no carpeting and the right material for any sofas.
The most damage was done when I had a spraying-problem,cat-pee eats in to any wooden furniture and some of my things still bare the evidence.
Luckily with the help of Feli-Way it has mostly stopped.

I always say,if you do not like cats with claws,get an aquarium,fishes do no damage:laughing:
We in Canada,or I should say our government,is not really that interested in ,giving a lowly kitty,or any animal for that matter a better life,free from horrible mutilation..

sugarcatmom
November 19th, 2009, 05:55 PM
What would be the medical need that would require the cat to be declawed?? I can't think of any reason that a cat's health would require declawing and am wondering if anyone knows of one, cause that confuses me.

There is one example (a case of deformed toes) here on this forum: http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=66690&highlight=deformed+toes

Equla
November 19th, 2009, 06:32 PM
Here's where I am a little torn on the subject. There are so many homeless kitties out there that might have a chance at a family if they couldn't mutilate the furniture. It's horrible to disfigure the poor thing, but maybe we would have more homes...

Just thinking out loud, I guess. I don't declaw anymore, but that was my main argument for declaw when I was pro.

Love4himies
November 19th, 2009, 06:44 PM
Here's where I am a little torn on the subject. There are so many homeless kitties out there that might have a chance at a family if they couldn't mutilate the furniture. It's horrible to disfigure the poor thing, but maybe we would have more homes...

Just thinking out loud, I guess. I don't declaw anymore, but that was my main argument for declaw when I was pro.

If a cat happens to be destructive (I have fostered many and have owned many), which I have never encountered myself, then there are ways to prevent it, such as keeping the claws clipped short and putting a quality cat stand in appropriate places (not necessarily where the human wants it).

Equla
November 19th, 2009, 07:09 PM
Didn't they used to have little cap thingies they could put over the claws to keep them dull?

I imagine it might not work for the same reason just clipping the muscle wouldn't work. The claws need to shed and it would be pretty annoying to the cat to not be able to do it, but...

Do they still do that?

Also, for those with clawing issues on furniture: you can put double-sided tape on the corners. The cats hate the way it feels and will eventually be turned off of the surface.

My Mom also used to put pepper in her plants to keep the kitties from peeing in them. Is that safe? Could sprinkle some of that on the carpet where they like to scratch.

sugarcatmom
November 19th, 2009, 07:56 PM
Here's where I am a little torn on the subject. There are so many homeless kitties out there that might have a chance at a family if they couldn't mutilate the furniture.


Then why are there so many declawed cats in shelters?
http://www.pawproject.com/html/faqs.asp

Do declawed cats find homes more easily because they won't damage furniture? Will people abandon or euthanize their cats if they cannot have a veterinarian declaw their cats?
Actually, declawed cats may be at a disadvantage. There is evidence that declawed cats are disproportionately abandoned at shelters, and that declawed cats may be euthanized more often because of the behavioral and physical problems that result from declawing. Pet owners typically cite protection of their furnishings as being foremost among their reasons for having a cat declawed; however, such owners may not realize that the pain and other complications from the surgery can cause behavioral problems that are even worse than the problems for which the cat's toes were amputated. A cat can still bite a child and may become more prone to do so if it has no claws. A cat whose paws hurt when scratching in a litter box may avoid the litter box altogether, a behavior that may not be tolerated by the owner.

sugarcatmom
November 19th, 2009, 07:58 PM
Do they still do that?


Yup, they're called Soft Paws (http://www.softpaws.com/). They work for some kitties, but need to be replaced frequently as the nails shed.