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Rescues and Children

Macomom
September 17th, 2009, 02:29 PM
Hello Pets.ca-ers,

I am interested in getting my dogs from rescue organizations because this aligns with my family and their beliefs, however, I have noticed many rescues post that they do not send large breed dogs to homes with children (under 8)- no exceptions!

This seems overly heavy handed to me, and I think our family is the exception.
I have two dog saavy children aged 5 and 7, who have had a dog their whole lives. They are never unsupervised with our dogs, and have been taught from the beginning, the importance of empathy and compassion with animals.
They do not pester, bug or play with our dogs inappropriately.
They do a limited and supervised amount of obedience with the dogs as well.

Does this limit me from my rescue adoption choices? I did not even try to communicate with these rescues since I thought it was a lost cause.
Please share your thoughts with me.
Cheers.

Love4himies
September 17th, 2009, 02:38 PM
I would talk to BenMax who is heavily into rescue. She may be able to recommend some rescues

BenMax
September 17th, 2009, 02:38 PM
Some rescues are very strict on this subject and will not deviate. I know other rescues that do have this restriction however will look into this on a one to one basis.

Rescues have this restriction also for little dogs as well. Again some are overly strict while others not so.

Being in rescue, what I would do is try to reach the rescue by phone if possible. Invite them to your home with everyone present. This way, they can observe the dynamics in your home environment and I am certain once they see with their own eyes that everything is cool - they will lift that restriction based on your requirements as well as a dog.

Rescues are cautious and normally base their pre-requisites based on experience. There are exceptions to every rule and I am certain you will find a rescue that will be more interested in your family individually and in person. If you tell me what breed or mix you are looking for, I may be able to gear you into the right direction.

BenMax
September 17th, 2009, 02:40 PM
I would talk to BenMax who is heavily into rescue. She may be able to recommend some rescues

:) You beat me to it!! LOL

Bailey_
September 17th, 2009, 02:49 PM
You might want to try and explain your situation and your childrens experience with dogs to some of these rescues. Around here, generally any child under 3 is the exception when a rescue deems a dog unsuitable for kids. With our daughter (who is a mere 15 months old) and our dog Blaze that we adopted from a rescue, we just walked right in and let the adoption coordinators see our daughter with the dogs.
Blaze was a dog that they had thought inappropriate for kids, but a lot of times, this is due to the dogs energy or age, not neccessarily because they don't 'tolerate' kids well, which was the situation in Blaze's case. She is quite an exuberant animal.
Even though we know Blaze would never intentionally hurt our daughter, the two are always supervised. If we, for whatever reason, can't watch them at the same time - the dog will go to her crate, or Kiley will be put in her high chair.

brianna079
September 17th, 2009, 02:51 PM
Our rescue puts every dog through a behaviour assessment before they can be adopted, and one of the things is to check if the dog can live with children. All dogs are evaluated fairly, and neither size nor breed determines whether a dog can live with or without children. it really depends on the dog and what they demonstrate in their evaluation.

Macomom
September 17th, 2009, 02:52 PM
I guess it is more of an ideological complaint. I may be whining, sorry :(

I adopted by DDB from a rescue and am fostering a bulldog now, but when I started this journey I became interested in a Great Dane rescue, who were adament about no children.

To my experienced foster friends- have you experienced many irresponsible parents who became pet owners? Is it so common that it becomes a staple rule?
Cheers.

BenMax
September 17th, 2009, 03:01 PM
I guess it is more of an ideological complaint. I may be whining, sorry :(

I adopted by DDB from a rescue and am fostering a bulldog now, but when I started this journey I became interested in a Great Dane rescue, who were adament about no children.

To my experienced foster friends- have you experienced many irresponsible parents who became pet owners? Is it so common that it becomes a staple rule?
Cheers.

If you already rescued a DDB from a rescue, use this rescue name and give this as a reference. I don't know why they would flatly say 'no' if they do not investigate the application.

BTW - just for your information - many shelters get danes as surrenders. If this rescue turns you down, this is another option. But - this rescue is not the only rescue with danes either....keep looking.

To answer your irresponsible parents question: The rescue will base the pre-requisite due to irresponsible PEOPLE that claim an animal is being given up due to children. Some people are not forgiving if a large dog runs over their kids without malice of course. Some families do not educate their children on how to treat an animal and due to this, the animal suffers greatly. Really, the rescue are taking precautions. But yes, there should be restrictions, but again I truly believe in evaluating on a one to one basis.

Bailey_
September 17th, 2009, 03:08 PM
To my experienced foster friends- have you experienced many irresponsible parents who became pet owners? Is it so common that it becomes a staple rule?
Cheers.

I agree with BM on this one. Generally a lot of parents don't know how to properly show their child how to approach or handle a dog. I have so many kids running up to my dogs on walks, bending down and hugging them (without even asking first).

The problem lies with societys perception that a dog should just tolerate a child, which is never the case in a dogs world. Obviously we all know that dogs expect respect, just like humans. So I do think it's important for rescues to place these age limits with their dogs, because of this line of thinking that has been adopted by people who don't fully 'understand'.

It's a shame that some rescues feel the need to be very strict about this, because I also believe that there are so many great families with kids who are understanding of dog behavior/language who could easily adopt, and I'm personally SO thankful that we were allowed to take Blaze. She's been such a joy.

But on the flip side, if it means a dog has to stay at a rescue a little bit longer to find a home that understands how to handle it, and avoid having that dog rehomed a few more times, then I'm all for that too. :thumbs up

BenMax
September 17th, 2009, 03:14 PM
Just to give you some insight - when my daughter was 1.5 years old, I volunteered at a shelter and took her with me. My daughter wanted Max, a large GSD that had been shot and beaten by his owner. Max was not up for adoption however my daughter was insistant on having him. I was given access to work with Max for 6 months before taking him home as he was really a tough case. He instantly took to my daughter but not me at first.

So - I am telling you this because the shelter saw me and knew me well. Had I just applied for him without them meeting me and my child first, I guarantee you that I would not have had the right to have Max as a part of my family. Having my daughter with me only proved that we were tolerant, determined and educated. Even a child so young knew by watching mom, how animals were to be treated.

Macomom
September 17th, 2009, 03:48 PM
I am quite proud of how my children treat our pets. It warms my heart to see them be so respectful and loving consistently.

Bailey_
September 17th, 2009, 04:02 PM
I am quite proud of how my children treat our pets. It warms my heart to see them be so respectful and loving consistently.

:D That is awesome Macomom. It is such a great feeling to know that our children are learning from our example in regards to animals.

Do you think you'll call the rescues and see if you can plead your case?

BenMax
September 17th, 2009, 04:13 PM
I am quite proud of how my children treat our pets. It warms my heart to see them be so respectful and loving consistently.

If that is the case, then stick to your guns and go the rescue route. Try to actually speak with them on the phone so that they can get an essense of who you are. Invite them to your home.

fosterpat
September 17th, 2009, 05:04 PM
As a foster parents for the last 5 years and a mom of 3 kids. I sometimes think all children are like mine, respectfull around animals. But i have unfortunately learned that this is not the case.
I have however adopted out small breed pups and dogs to homes with young children. But by a rule, I always like to meet them first. I have also turned some down after meeting them.
When we take in a dog there is always a honeymoon phase until we see the thru colours of the dog. Even as a foster, I sometimes have to transfer a dog to another home because he/she is not good with my children. Sometimes it's not the child, but rather the dog who is not used to or nervous around children.
As everyone has said before, send an email explaining your family. Certainly use your previous experience with the other rescue as a reference. I sometimes have to relook at certain applications and I do change my mind after speaking with them. Put a lot of info in your email...it will help the rescue to make their decision.
Good luck!

Frenchy
September 17th, 2009, 09:55 PM
I have noticed many rescues post that they do not send large breed dogs to homes with children (under 8)- no exceptions!



I totally agree , and also for small dogs , not only the big ones.... see , we usually don't know the dogs past lives. Dogs in rescues are often pulled out of shelters , we don't know where they have been. Or we do know that they came from abusive homes. It's for the welfare of the kids but also , rescues can't afford attorneys. And if ANYTHING happens between the dogs and kids , it's the rescue who will be blame or worse , sue. And the dog can suffer from this too , if the owner reports it , the dog will be put to sleep. Not to mention if a kid gets injured ..... So some rescues don't want to take that chance.

Yes , your kids might be very experience with dogs but , rescues don't know YOU personally , they don't know your kids. :shrug:

That put aside , many rescues will go case by case , I for one , let a family with 4 kids (all 8 +) adopt one of my fosters , a puppy mill survivor. Some people told me I shouldn't let that dog go to that big of a family. But I exchanges e-mails with them , then phone calls , then I met them , and got a VERY good vibe from them. They were all devoted to work with the dog , and they did. I got updates from them , for about 2 years , and the dog did very good !

So I say , if you really want a rescue dog , at least try , and apply. :shrug:

Shaykeija
September 20th, 2009, 12:30 PM
i do small dog rescue and I will not adopt to anyone who has kids under 30:evil:. Just joking there. but I do not adopt them to people with kids under 14. My rescue, my rules. I just want to make sure my dogs get the perfect fit. Most of the dogs I get are the ones who face death and I am their last chance, so I work very hard to make sure they get the best I can find. These dogs are old and sometimes cranky but still need a place to be safe and loved.