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Ant Nest! What to do?

Bailey_
September 1st, 2009, 12:07 PM
Some of you already know that on Mondays and Tuesdays I've been helping my cousin with his summer/fall inventory. He has a big warehouse that he stores all this things in, and last week the DH was in the "lunchroom" (really just an area they keep a table, fridge, watercooler) and noticed that on the floor between the fridge and the wall everything was just black and moving. Upon closer inspection we found those tiny little black ants, and among them were black flying ants. :yuck: I'm NOT a fan of bugs.

The DH used some kind of spray, (I can't remember what it was, will get the name soon) but each morning they were back. He sprayed three days.

Yesterday we checked and they were back!!

I don't really *mind* them, they aren't hurting anything, but it is slightly disturbing because you can tell the nest is huge and we're concerned that damage could be done to the foundation.

Does anyone have any comments on these types of ants? If we need to worry, if we can leave them be, or if we need to do something? And if so, what?:confused:

hazelrunpack
September 1st, 2009, 12:08 PM
Are they sweet-eating or wood-eating?

Bailey_
September 1st, 2009, 12:09 PM
How can you tell?

breeze
September 1st, 2009, 12:11 PM
I heard that you can put down cornmeal and the ants will take them back to the nest, the ants cqan't digest cornmeal and well in turn they will die.

Bailey_
September 1st, 2009, 12:13 PM
Cornmeal? No way! I hadn't heard that. I'll pass that along. Of course we don't really want to kill them if we don't *have* too. They seem fairly harmless right now, are only staying around that one portion of wall/floor that they come up out of.

hazelrunpack
September 1st, 2009, 12:21 PM
I'm afraid if you want to be rid of them, you'll likely have to kill the nest.

If you put out some sugar water (just a few drops) in their path as a test, you'll see soon enough if they're attracted to sweet. If they're wood-eaters, you'll find sawdust somewhere and you'll need to check for structural damage. Are they large or small ants?

Are you still seeing winged ones? Sounds like they're getting ready for a fall flight. :D That's the newest generation in the making.

Bailey_
September 1st, 2009, 12:23 PM
Yes, still seeing the winged ones. I just checked and they're starting to come up and out of the hole again - they weren't this morning, I only saw one or two little non-winged ones.

Will pepsi work? I don't have any sugar on hand...

If they are sweet eating, are they a danger to the foundation?

Thanks for the tips all!

pbpatti
September 1st, 2009, 12:25 PM
I heard that you can put down cornmeal and the ants will take them back to the nest, the ants cqan't digest cornmeal and well in turn they will die.
no, no the cornmeal does not work :yell: I tried it and they just hauled it into the nest and when the nest was full they dug new ones:cool: I hate antssss

Bailey_
September 1st, 2009, 12:26 PM
no, no the cornmeal does not work :yell: I tried it and they just hauled it into the nest and when the nest was full they dug new ones:cool: I hate antssss

Uh oh, really!? Yes, they are sneaky that's for sure!!!

breeze
September 1st, 2009, 12:31 PM
Bendy can you help ,


she is very good with bugs..

Dog Dancer
September 1st, 2009, 12:49 PM
Well on the getridofthings website I looked at for carpet beetles, it said Boric Acid will kill most insects it comes into contact with yet it won't harm people. So I'd get some and put it on and around the hole the ants are coming from. I might also try baking soda.

Marcha
September 1st, 2009, 12:53 PM
If they're wood-eating (carpenter) ants, they wont' bring anything back to the queen. If they're sugar-eating ants, they will.

For carpenter ants, spraying will only exterminate the ones that are sprayed. The only thing that works is nasty powder that kills them when they cross the powder and it is blasted into the area where they are by means of a sprayer under pressure. The powder is mildly toxic to humans and animals too, in that it is a skin irritant. The powder is lethal to fish and birds (and ants, of course). If you get the area treated, you'll need to vacate the area for a few hours. Personally, because it is a skin irritant, I prefer to remove anything from the room that is being treated, and cover furniture with plastic so that the powdery residu doesn't settle onto the furniture or into textiles. Makes for a bit of work, but gives peace of mind. The outside workers (workers that go beyond the core of the nest) who gather food for the inside workers (workers that don't leave the core) and larvae won't return with food, the inside workers die, the larvae starve, the queen doesn't get fed (she 'eats' the excrements from the larvae. If they're dead, there's no food for the queen).

If it's carpenter ants, then be on the lookout for satellite nests. There can be 20 or more satellites on a soccer field sized area.

Find the area where they enter and exit the house. This is best done at or after dusk, when outside temps drop and the outside workers come out in droves. There'll be some 'guards' by the entry point, and after dusk there'll be a steady path of ants going out to 'hunt'. Entry points are cracks in the siding, the border of siding/foundations, electrical or water outlets, and they even use power lines or gutters to get from the house to the outside and back. Powder spray the area where they enter/exit too, because each one that crosses the line will also not return to the core with food.

If they are sugar ants, they bring food back to the queen, and you can use borax mixed with a juice concentrate or something (or regular ant-traps) to kill the ants and the queen.

hazelrunpack
September 1st, 2009, 12:53 PM
If they're all winged, Bailey, they may be on their way out. Winged ants disperse to find new colonies.

And if some are small, likely they aren't carpenter ants (the wood-eaters) cuz they tend to be quite large (like a cm or more).

Pepsi would work--as long as its fully loaded (sugared :D)

Boric acid would work with sweet eaters--and I think some people actually mix it into something sweet so they bring it back to the nest, don't they? Hmmm...can't remember where I read that.

Bailey_
September 1st, 2009, 01:20 PM
Thanks everyone for the information!!

Hazel, the little black ones are very - very small. The ones with wings are larger. Does this mean they could be from different nests, or probably just the same? I did the pepsi test and they flocked too it...I still haven't been able to remove the juice lid (which I put the pepsi in) because they are all over it. :yuck: LOL I think I may have just given them a feast for a month.

Ahhh, so many questions. Thanks all!

hazelrunpack
September 1st, 2009, 01:28 PM
I think the winged forms can be larger than the rank-and-file workers. They're the new queens. Bendyfoot would know for sure.

Love4himies
September 1st, 2009, 02:00 PM
Yes, the new winged ones are Queens off looking to start another nest.

Boric acid it think does work. It creates gas in their tummies and makes them explode. The trick is to get them to take it back to the queen to kill her off.

Bailey_
September 1st, 2009, 02:09 PM
:eek: Explode? OMG!

Do you have to give it to them at a certain 'time' of day for them to take it back?

CearaQC
September 1st, 2009, 03:17 PM
Mycologist Paul Stamets has developed a method with fungus that attracts the bugs and they take it back to the nest. Once it's in the nest, the fungus colonizes the bug bodies and a tiny mushroom will pop out of their heads. The whole nest is killed.

Then the fungus sporulates and REPELS bugs like carpenter ants, protecting your house against further invasion for a few years.

A much better alternative to any chemical in my opinion. Here is a video showing how Stamets battled carpenter ants that were destroying his home.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XI5frPV58tY

In the video he also shows how Oyster mushrooms can reclaim crude oil contaminated soil, and other benefits of fungi.

Love4himies
September 1st, 2009, 04:27 PM
:eek: Explode? OMG!

Do you have to give it to them at a certain 'time' of day for them to take it back?

I don't think so, but I think they may need something to attract them to it, perhaps molasses :shrug:.

Marcha
September 1st, 2009, 04:55 PM
Mycologist Paul Stamets has developed a method with fungus that attracts the bugs and they take it back to the nest. Once it's in the nest, the fungus colonizes the bug bodies and a tiny mushroom will pop out of their heads. The whole nest is killed.

Then the fungus sporulates and REPELS bugs like carpenter ants, protecting your house against further invasion for a few years.

A much better alternative to any chemical in my opinion. Here is a video showing how Stamets battled carpenter ants that were destroying his home.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XI5frPV58tY

In the video he also shows how Oyster mushrooms can reclaim crude oil contaminated soil, and other benefits of fungi.

Brilliant! I am definitely looking into that to see whether it's an available option for us!

CearaQC
September 1st, 2009, 06:59 PM
Brilliant! I am definitely looking into that to see whether it's an available option for us!

He's patented it and shows off his patents in several filmed lectures like the one at TED, but don't know where the product is sold, if at all. May have to contact Paul Stamets at his website. It needs to be out on the market but many larger corporations don't like a cheaper natural alternative taking away their profit.

I figure if people continue sharing information, things will change for the better. And that's why I share TED talks a lot, because they show things that don't make it onto mainstream TV. But Stamets is one of my favorite speakers, even though he stutters a lot. :laughing: