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Staffy for young family help pls

Marina31
August 18th, 2009, 09:23 PM
Hello,
I was after some advice on purchasing dog if anyone can pls hlp!?
We have two kids under 5. My hubby is a dog person growing up with staffies and rotties. I don't know a lot so am doing some research before we make the life commitment.

I know many say not to get dogs till after kids are 6 - however hubby not interested in this theory. I'm fully aware they would have to be under direct supervision all the time. He really wants a staffy. Here are some of my questions.

1) How much training is required for stafforhshire bull terrier- Are the easily trianed, hard to train etc etc

2) How energectic are they? I heard you can get lazy ones and then really hyper ones????

3) Do they tend to rip washing off line, jump, bite, dig, when in yard? Do they rip things up if inside?

4) Are they dog/people agressive when walking? Do they pull or lunge?

5) Do they whimper at night or bark at everything that walks by?

5) How are they with kids - gentle or do they need to be taught, bowl kids over etc etc?

I know some of these questions are all what training is for and that most dog/puppies do all these things, really just wondering if staffy is a suitable dog for our current situation. My mum tends to freak out when I talk about getting one - however i have only had contact with very loyal gentle staffies.
Any advice is great!! If I hve missed any vital questions please let me know. I'm also happ to hear of other suitable dogs - however hubby not keen on retrivers or little cuddly dogs which i know are often ones recommended for families! THANKS

babymomma
August 18th, 2009, 10:21 PM
lol... Answers to questions..

Q. 1) How much training is required for stafforhshire bull terrier- Are the easily trianed, hard to train etc etc

A. Terrier.. TERRIER.. ALOT of training. Most terriers I have come in contact with can never be let of leash, even with all the training in the world. If they see something running.. They want it.. All dogs require training but be prepared and have PATIENCE.. Terriers are known to puch boundaries and be a little hard headed and strong willed.. Ok Ok i know guys.. Its not ALWAYS the case but lets face it. The majority are.

Q. 2) How energectic are they? I heard you can get lazy ones and then really hyper ones????

A. That can be the same with ANY breed. You may luck out and get which ever one you want.. But the truth is, Unless you adopt an adult from a shelter (Which I recomend BTW) you wont know with a puppy what it will turn out like.. I have to go back to the Terrier thing.. Terriers have a strong will to work.. They are EAGER to work.. If you Give them a good 40 minutes to one hour of walking per day (Split into 2-3 walks) They should be fine.. All dogs need excersize.. If you get a hyper dog, all you need to do is take some extra time to excersize more to calm... Along with walking you terrier will need mental stimulation. That includes about 10 minutes at leat of training per day and Some playtime with balls, pull toys, chew treats, A stuffed kong.. Etc.


Q 3) Do they tend to rip washing off line, jump, bite, dig, when in yard? Do they rip things up if inside?

A. If your dog gets his/her required amount of activity and stimulation thru-out the day the dog should NOT be destructive as he will be tired and , stimulated. Dogs do these things when they are bored.. They do them to create something fun for themselves. For outside, Dont leave him alone unatended out there. That way he cant get into trouble and if he tries you can correct the behaviour. Inside, Same thing. If your not at home, Crate him/her.


4) Are they dog/people agressive when walking? Do they pull or lunge?

A. Staffies are not known to be People agresive.. If you purchase a puppy, especially one of this breed. You need to socialize socialize SOCIALIZE. With humans AND more imprtantly DOGS. They are Known for being DA. They have something Bred into tthem that tells them to NEVER give up. Just like the American Pittbull terrier.. That is Why training can sometimes be a pain and that is why it would be dangerous for them to become either Human or dog aggresive. Because they will not gve up very easily.. Pulling on walks is EASY to train them out of. They are STRONG dogs so you need to start teaching leash manners from day one..They should ALWAYS walk besideyou and there should NEVER be any pressure on the leash.

4) Do they whimper at night or bark at everything that walks by?

A. I think this and some other questions doesnt go for the staffie. It goes for ALL dogs.. Again, you can train them out of these things.. I dont know if thats something the breed is "Known for" But if you get a puppy I would expect it to whimper in its crate for the first few nights. Just remember NEVER give in to any whimpering. Do not take them out of there crate just ignore them until they stop.. Easier said then done I know.. lol.. Most dogs bark when people come to the house. Some bark when people walk by. But f trained properly and socialized properly I dont see why it owuld be much of a problem.

5) How are they with kids - gentle or do they need to be taught, bowl kids over etc etc?

Staffies Are good with children. But they ARE a pretty big dog compared to a child.. If they get too excited they may knock them over, That could be avoided by keeping the dog well excersized and stimulated. But most importantly you need to teach them (Any dog) not to be rough with children. Not to take food out of there hands. To be gentle. And Even more imprtant. Teach your children that Pulling on the dog, hitting a dog and being rough to the dog is a big NO. Dogs have feelings too and if, Godforbid a child was pulling on the dog and the dog snapped. Not only would it be bad for the child but the dog would be blamed. By you, the child, And authorities and would likely get PTS. And there would be another black mark for the breed.


If you ever plan on having your staffie around other dogs or getting another dog. I recommend getting a dog thats around 2 years old from a shelter. Because many staffies and Pittsbulls tend to be DA and Sometimes it doesnt show until a later age.Looking for a shelter staffie they will be able to tell you if the dogs are good with dogs, If they are bad with them or if they are just Dog reactive. Alot of rescues say alot of larger dogs are not good with kids (Not because of bad experiance) but if you are experianced and are willing to work with the dog dont be discouaraged they may change there minds with the situiation.


Anything I missed please ask. These are just my opinions, observations and personal experiances. And Alot has come from 2 years of research.. lol

LavenderRott
August 18th, 2009, 10:31 PM
First - tell your husband that if he wants a Staffy - he needs to do his homework. You are bringing this dog into a home with small children and you need to be sure that your children are safe. While the answer to your questions will mostly depend on how your husband trains your pup - you really need to start out either with a temperment tested adult from a reputable rescue or a genetically sound puppy from an ETHICAL breeder.

If you go to this website, it will give you a list of genetic issue that you need to know about. You want to find a breeder who tests for them and does not breed dogs that are affected.
http://www.upei.ca/cidd/intro.htm

Bailey_
August 18th, 2009, 10:38 PM
I have a fourteen month old daughter and we currently have two dogs. A labradoodle puppy that we aquired when my daughter was just a few months old, and lab mix rescue that we brought home two months ago.

Both dogs do wonderful with my extremley young daughter, and even when Kiley was a baby - our puppy, Bailey, learned very quickly how to play properly with her. It's ALL about supervision, consistancy, proper training and learning to understand your dog. With any age of dog, children need to be supervised. Often times it's a matter of teaching them how to handle the dog and how to approach the dog, first and foremost, to ensure safety.

http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs026.snc1/2651_141278250530_685520530_6260033_4979556_n.jpg
My Daughter (10 months old) & Bailey

Picking the correct temperment and energy levels for a new dog to your family is essential - if you're not a very active "outdoorsy" family, chances are a Staffy won't be the right breed for your home.

Do you have any local reputable breeders that you can take your children to meet their adult dogs and get a better idea of what to expect in person? It's a great idea to read up about different dog breeds online, but the only real way to understand is to meet them yourself. Once you've determined whether a staffy is for you, try locating local rescues instead of immediatley buying from a breeder. There are a lot of wonderful dogs of all ages in need of homes already.

babymomma
August 18th, 2009, 10:47 PM
Good post bailey and OMG your daughter is SO cute!.. She is gorgous.. As is the puppeh! haha

Bailey_
August 18th, 2009, 10:49 PM
Awwh, thanks BM! :) She loves her dogs, thats for sure! :D

Marina31
August 18th, 2009, 11:27 PM
Thanks for all the replies and advice so far! We have been keeping a look out at the two shelters we have here. I am in Cairns and am unsure about breeders as yet, I have seen ads in the paper and had suggested we take our 2 year old son to meet/view puppy and parents. I thought a puppy may be preferable so that it is trained to be around the kids, other people and dogs, trained in the way we would like. However I do understand an older dog may be better but am also concerned that it may show traits or behaviours that were acceptable in its old home but not in ours if you get what I mean? Would it be hard to break these if they are an older dog? I really want to get this right seeing as we have two young children. Any opinions are welcome.
Bailey - lovely pic!

babymomma
August 18th, 2009, 11:39 PM
First of all, you need to resaerach what how to find a GOOD breeder.

If you see puppies advertised in the newspaper or on an internet webpage.

RUN.. As far and fast as possible from those breeders.

You need to stay away from backyard Breeders, Puppymills and petstores. As People like that are breeding dogs just for the money and not taking into consideration how healthy the dogs should be and what the temperment should be.

When finding a breeder, ask as many questions as possible that you want to know. Parents temperment, if they have any people with there puppies willing to talk to you on how there pup has been doing, where the dogs are kept, if the health test, what food they feed etc etc.

If the breeder doesnt want to answer questions. he/she has something to hide.. they get defensive. RUN. Dont look back. Find another breeder.

With this particular breed, I would say find somebody that is definatly health testing there dogs.

Ussually the only breeders doing that are CKC/AKC/Other KC registered breeders.

Ask about tempment. That is the other most imprtant thing. You do NOT want a pup from a breeder who has dogs with bad temperments. Weather it be her dogs are too shy and skittish, or they are down right nasty and aggressive dogs.

Registered or WELLBRED dogs Cost more. but you have to understand that in the long run, reputable breeders make NO money off of a puppy. They speand juhst as much, if not MORE money on your puppy and its parent then you speand on it.. They are in it for the love of the breed not money.

Go to the breeders home and see the dogs. Do your research. the dogs shuld be friendly towards you. Its not unusual for some dogs to be wary at first but they should come around after a few minutes, if not i would be wary.
If the dogs are kept outside in kennels. Never in the house. Im afraid there is no way that the pups ever go the right socialization to humans and things around the house at an early age. I wouldnt buy a puppy from somebody like that. because when you bring your pup home there will be problems. It will be scared of the house because everything will be new.

And you have to remember that just because a breeder has registered dogs. Does not mean they are a good breeder. I knwo a breeder of shelties that are CKC registered and they are Downright neglected. They get no vet care and are producing puppy after puppy after puppy and She is making 700 bucks a pup and all she speands on the pup is the cost of her crap food.


Just my :2cents:

babymomma
August 18th, 2009, 11:42 PM
. However I do understand an older dog may be better but am also concerned that it may show traits or behaviours that were acceptable in its old home but not in ours if you get what I mean? Would it be hard to break these if they are an older dog? I really want to get this right seeing as we have two young children. Any opinions are welcome.
Bailey - lovely pic!

Not hard at all.

You hear that saying, you cant teach an old dog new tricks? yea, bot true at all. I think it would be easy. Ive yet to have a dog come into my home that belongs to family and just start to take over as it woul din its own home. We establish that it is our home and they have to play by OUR rules as soon as they set paw inside the door.

Dont want him on the couch? make him get off. They get the message very quickly.

You just have to work on establishing your role as the leader at the very beginning.

Marina31
August 19th, 2009, 12:24 AM
Thanks babymomma! I'm going to make my hubby read all these posts haha!
I might get him to do some askin around as to which breeders are reputable here. I know he has a few friends who hve got staffies from here. It would be a great if a nice adult one comes up in a shelter!

Bailey_
August 19th, 2009, 12:34 AM
I agree with BabyMomma on the fact that you can certainly teach an old dog new tricks.

Our rescue that we took in a few months ago is still learning, but she's doing wonderful. We however did luck out and she didn't ever seem to have an issue with kids, possibly because she came from a child-home previous to our adopting her.

The only thing I want to add about adopting an older dog into a home with children is that, while extremley rewarding, from experience I can tell you that you may have to look a little bit longer and a little bit harder to find a suitable adult Staffy to be around your children if you go the rescue route.

Dogs who have never been around children in their life, tend to have a lower tolerance for them than dogs that have been. This does not mean to say that the dog would *hurt* your child however.
It's not their fault, and they can quickly learn if taught properly how to behave around your kids. Because you have a specific breed in mind, you may find that the first few Staffies you meet should not be the one to go home with your family.

With that said, a puppy is a LOT of work, especially with children. I can't even tell you how thankful I was to have my Mother-in-Law so close to watch my daughter for me a few days a week so I could dedicate my time to house-training Bailey. It's a very intense, sometimes long process. You have to be ready for an added "child" when you bring any dog into your home. They require a lot of attention and love, and you will naturally have to devote time to them that could be spent otherwise with your kids.

A few times I've had to peel my crying daughter off of me and hand her to my husband as I put the leashes on the dogs and headed out for a walk, on the odd occasion that she couldn't come with me. It's heartbreaking, but it's life with pets. :shrug:

As long as you're aware of all the pros and cons to having a dog, and whether or not you want a puppy or an adult; there are a lot of really knowledgeable people on this forum who can help you through the process. :thumbs up

Marty11
August 19th, 2009, 07:35 AM
Look at a larger male Boston Terrier. Great with kids and stocky enough that they aren't small and intimidated by children.

mollywog
August 19th, 2009, 09:40 AM
Originally Posted by Marina31
. However I do understand an older dog may be better but am also concerned that it may show traits or behaviours that were acceptable in its old home but not in ours if you get what I mean? Would it be hard to break these if they are an older dog? I really want to get this right seeing as we have two young children. Any opinions are welcome

Originally posted by BabyMomma:
Not hard at all.

You hear that saying, you cant teach an old dog new tricks? yea, bot true at all. I think it would be easy. Ive yet to have a dog come into my home that belongs to family and just start to take over as it woul din its own home. We establish that it is our home and they have to play by OUR rules as soon as they set paw inside the door.

Dont want him on the couch? make him get off. They get the message very quickly.

You just have to work on establishing your role as the leader at the very beginning.

Babymomma, I have to respectfully disagree with you on this one. Especially where a bully breed and young children are involved. Many "mature" dogs who are in rescue have been through the wringer and may not trust humans, so it's not always as easy as just taking it into your home and suddenly it's following your rules. It is MUCH harder to work out old habits/ behaviours in a mature dog than it is to train the "right" way from puppyhood. When we rescued Molly we had no idea of some of the issues that would come along with her. It's been a long road and personally, if I had kids right now, I don't know if I would have the time or energy to be working through those issues. I don't regret it for a second, but I just want others to know what to expect. :2cents:

Marina31- some good advice has been given to you here. Mainly- do your research!!! And make sure you are ready to make the commitment to this dog, no matter what comes your way.
Why is it that your husband wants a Staffy as opposed to any other breed? I am sure you could find some great pups in rescue who have the same great qualities he is looking for. Once you find the right one, ask if you can have a "trial weekend" with the dog before you fully commit.
Good luck and keep us posted!!!

babymomma
August 19th, 2009, 12:05 PM
No Prob MollyWog:thumbs up

But when she said bad habbits I was thinking more along the lines of eating from the table, beging for it, Jumping all over furniture..

Other issues such as, say issues with men, issues with children. LArger issues that ARE hard to get out of the should be warned by the rescue. And If they are not up to it. They find another dog:shrug:

Keely was allowed on the couch since we had her. When we were eating on the couch she would be up in my moms arms or my dads arms and getting the scattered snack.. You would think THAT would be hard to ge out of an adult dog. BUt like, Last month in took us TWO DAYS to teach her that, that was now a HUGE no-no. Two days and when we were eating she woul go to her mat and lie down.. She is juyst now allowed to get up on the couch again, when invited again.

It wasnt easy because keely is an "easy dog" TRUST ME, she is the FURTHEST thing from that.. She is a Terrier. Which means she has what I call a thick skull.. She is the most strong willed dog ive seen:shrug:

Another look.. Kacee. She isnt an house dog. When I started walking her she came into my home for the first time and started digging at the couch. (The fact that she was on the couch was rude enough) It really didnt take her long at all to learn where she should be and what she should be doing. And she was 7 years old. :shrug:

luckypenny
August 19th, 2009, 08:19 PM
Many "mature" dogs who are in rescue have been through the wringer and may not trust humans, so it's not always as easy as just taking it into your home and suddenly it's following your rules. It is MUCH harder to work out old habits/ behaviours in a mature dog than it is to train the "right" way from puppyhood. When we rescued Molly we had no idea of some of the issues that would come along with her. It's been a long road and personally, if I had kids right now, I don't know if I would have the time or energy to be working through those issues. I don't regret it for a second, but I just want others to know what to expect. :2cents:

I'm glad you brought that up mollywog. A dog temperament tested in a shelter environment may not behave the same in a home environment. Perhaps if you inquired about a dog from a Rescue that uses fosters who also have very young children, you'd have a better idea if the dog is well suited for children. That said, there's no guarantee that if one raises a dog from puppyhood, that the dog would tolerate children better either, regardless of the training. There are so many factors involved but, most importantly, I believe both parents should be well experienced with dogs before bringing any into the home with such young toddlers.

kandy
August 20th, 2009, 10:39 AM
Take your children with you to the shelter - watch for dogs who 'light up' at the sight of the children. Some dogs will never enjoy being around children, even if they are raised from a pup. Rather than limiting yourself to one specific breed, I'd look for the desired interaction between a dog and your children. And of course, no matter what breed you eventually get, the children must be taught that dogs are living, feeling creatures and need to be treated gently and calmly. My newfie girl absolutely loves kids, even though she wasn't raised with children. My collie mutt will tolerate older children who can throw a ball for him, but has no interest in younger children. He could be trained to tolerate younger children, but he would be much more likely to snap at a child than my newf.

If you are intent on buying from a breeder, start by contacting the regional Staffordshire Bull Terrier club for recommendations. Just because a breeder is registered with a kennel club does not mean they are reputable. Normally the breed clubs will have moral and ethical standards that a breeder must conform to in addition to health testing standards. Reputable breeders have no need to advertise because their pups are all spoken for long before they are born, and most times will have a waiting list for those pups.

Akira
August 20th, 2009, 08:45 PM
I don't mean to rain on any parade, but aren't staffies illegal too? I know I would be worried about getting a staffie and somone mistaking it for a pitbull.
Why not a american bulldog, or.. somthing along those lines. You said your hubby grew up with rotties, why not one of those? Ive heard they are good family dogs, and could possibly be easier to train then a terrier. Don't quote me though, I know how difficult terriers are, but I dont know much about rotties.

Maybe before you bring the dog/puppy home, bring your children to meet them and see how they interact. Just be sure to teach your children how to approach a dog without intimidating them, its actualy on the main page of the website.