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How long do my eggs have left?

dollface
August 18th, 2009, 04:08 PM
Date on the pkg is Jul 31st but that's usually the sell by date. Bad eggs float in water. If the bottom of the egg is raised to the surface and the egg is about to start floating freely, how many days do you think I have left? I would eat them for lunch but it's too late for lunch...

luckypenny
August 18th, 2009, 04:13 PM
You can hard boil them all to save you another three days.

dollface
August 18th, 2009, 04:17 PM
Not really a fan of hard boiled eggs unless they are devilled :)

luckypenny
August 18th, 2009, 04:25 PM
Deviled eggs, egg salad, egg sandwiches, add to a potato salad....mmmmm I love my eggs :cloud9: :D.

dollface
August 18th, 2009, 04:29 PM
lol I like to fry my eggs, and i wish i knew how to make all you just said lol

luckypenny
August 18th, 2009, 04:32 PM
Over easy fried eggs on toast are my fav :).

Here ya go...no shortage of recipes here :D

http://www.eggs.ca/EggRecipes/AllRecipes.aspx

dollface
August 18th, 2009, 04:48 PM
ooo thanks! :D that will go to use right away! and i think i will fry those eggs up either for dinner or tomorrow's lunch!

Gail P
August 18th, 2009, 05:18 PM
The float or sink theory doesn't always work. Believe me, I know :rolleyes: When I was a kid my cousin and I had fun finding eggs that were stashed away all over the place at the farm where we use to ride. We did the float test and then started giving eggs away to all of our neighbours at the cottage. Most were good but someone got a bad one and let us know. :o

What makes the egg float or sink actually only has to do with how much moisture has evaporated from inside the egg. I have chickens and have occasionally incubated my own eggs and if you candle them you can see the air chamber and use it's size as a guide as to whether to increase or decrease the humidity in the incubator.

I honestly have no idea how long eggs will really keep, mine are fresh from the hens and don't come with expiry dates :D I would say if in doubt crack the egg carefully into a container and see how it looks/smells. Don't crack it directly into anything else you're cooking (eg. if you're frying bacon) or into any baking or if it's bad it will contaminate the other food.

Egg salad is super easy to make, just hard boil the eggs than mash them with a potato masher, add some mayonaisse, onion, salt or pepper to taste and you're done. Funny enough, I have hens but I don't eat a lot of eggs myself. Only in pancakes, omlettes or scrambled, and I add scrambled eggs to the fried rice I make too. Occasionally french toast. My daughter likes them soft-boiled and my dh likes them fried and in a sandwich with bacon. The dogs love them raw, complete with shell.

dollface
August 18th, 2009, 05:46 PM
Thanks Gail P! Did not know the float test didn't always work :( Guess I will just have to eat them asap! mmmm fried rice :drool: lol

Gail P
August 18th, 2009, 09:26 PM
mmmm fried rice :drool: lol
The one-dish wonder meal :D Once the rice is boiled or steamed, in a large electric frying pan saute onions and celery in a bit of butter or oil, then scramble egg into it. I add in any leftover cooked meat I may have (roast beef, chicken, turkey, ham etc.) Add the rice, soya sauce, frozen veggies like peas and carrots are a nice touch at this stage too. If I have some bean sprouts I also throw them in. Stir frequently to prevent sticking. MMMMMMmmmm. Great served with chicken balls and chow mein. Sometimes I just do the rice for a quicker meal, sometimes the whole shebang.

dollface
August 18th, 2009, 11:49 PM
OMG plz teach me everything you cook! :laughing: I love shrimp fried rice the most! :cloud9: :lovestruck: Can you make most chinese dishes? That would be an awesome talent! :thumbs up

Gail P
August 19th, 2009, 08:29 AM
OMG plz teach me everything you cook! :laughing: I love shrimp fried rice the most! :cloud9: :lovestruck: Can you make most chinese dishes? That would be an awesome talent! :thumbs up

You can substitute shrimp for the other meats, or add it as well as. I also sometimes make fried rice without meat when I have friends over who are vegetarians. My chinese food repertoire is pretty limited to the things I already mentioned. Chow mein or any other kind of stir fry is easy, heat up your pan/wok to a high temperature (I have a wok-shaped frying pan that I use) with just a tiny bit of oil in it. If you want any meat in it start with that and then add the larger/thicker veggies (eg. sliced carrots, celery etc.) and the softer things like the bean sprouts after so they don't overcook. keep it on pretty high heat and stir often so it doesn't burn. I find that most of the work is the preparation not the actual cooking. Stir fries and chicken balls all cook pretty quickly so you need to have everything chopped and ready before you begin. Also for the chow mein, in a little margarine container I mix together some salt, sugar, cornstarch, soya sauce and just a bit of water. Sorry, I don't measure so I can't really say how much of each, it might take a bit of experimenting to get it right. When you're almost done stir-frying the veggies (don't overcook, you want them to be a little crunchy still), shake up the mixture and pour it in. If it thickens the juices in the pan too much/too quickly (too much cornstarch), just add a little more water. I found a great recipe for onion rings in an old, old Country Woman magazine and I use that batter on the chicken balls. Tastes great and it's super easy. The chicken balls themselves are easy too. Just dip the chicken pieces into the batter and drop them into a deep fryer or a pot of oil that's on a pretty high heat. They'll sink at first and then begin to float. When the colour looks about right remove them (I put mine in paper-towel lines foil dishes to soak up any excess oil) and they can be kept warm in the oven at about 300F while you do another batch. Mmmmm. Scary how many of these I can eat. It's a good thing I don't make them too often. Onion rings are cooked the exact same way, just substitute onion for pieces of chicken. And believe it or not, cold onion rings make a great snack. Sounds kind of gross but when I've got leftovers in the fridge I can't stay out of them. I usually make the chicken balls while the rice is frying, and then put them into the oven to keep warm and do the chow mein last so it doesn't end up soggy.

dollface
August 19th, 2009, 05:56 PM
Wow Gail P you must be a whiz in the kitchen! Thank you for sharing :D I've got some experimenting to do! :goodvibes:

Gail P
August 19th, 2009, 08:22 PM
Wow Gail P you must be a whiz in the kitchen! Thank you for sharing :D I've got some experimenting to do! :goodvibes:

I don't know about whiz but I do what I can! :D Sometimes that involves improvising too. I remember once when I was cooking a big turkey for a holiday meal (and it was a BIG one, we raise our own and I have cooked them up to 36.5 pounds, luckily this one wasn't quite that big, probably more like 25 pounds). Anyhow, I'm thinking the turkey isn't cooking very fast, and wondering what's going on? Turns out the heat element in the bottom of the oven had quit working. So, what do you do when you're expecting a group of people for dinner and you have a half-cooked turkey? I thought about using my neighbour's oven since they were away and I was taking care of the place, but they have all new-fangled appliances and I didn't want to wreck something trying to figure out which button to push. I decided to go with option 2 and broil the darn thing. Cranked up the heat so that the upper element was on and after cooking for a while we flipped the turkey over so that the top side didn't get too dried out and the underside could get more heat. That was an interesting experience. I was afraid it would be all hard and dry but it didn't turn out too bad at all. I little dry on the very outside but still nice and moist inside.