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fluffy update

tlogan
August 14th, 2009, 01:22 AM
Fluffy has had the pu surgery that allows him to pee like a female cat (end of May 2009) . He seemed to be doing fine until the last two weeks, he is leaking urine everywhere - it is dripping vs stream of urine. He sits somewhere then gets up from a puddle of urine - he now has to see a vet specialist in Southern Ontario. He even pees in drops vs stream like he did after the surgery.

The food that he was to be on for the rest of his life maybe the cause making the urine's specific gravity off balance. And maybe his blood calcium level will tell us something when a complete blood-work is done. There is also another thought that the opening has gotten to small and he now has a functional problem with the ureter?

We have changed the food and hope that helps - I am seriously thinking raw food diet although Vet and food reps say urinary SO is what he should be on. His crystals were calcium oscalate that this food prevents but could essentially cause struvite crystals by lowering the ph to much.

I will keep everyone updated for anyone else experiencing this sort of dilema:shrug:

growler~GateKeeper
August 14th, 2009, 02:42 AM
It sounds like there might be a partial blockage :shrug: the surgery Fluffy had would allow for a larger urethra opening but it won't guarentee all stones would be passable, however it is less likely for female cats to have blockages for this reason. Or maybe scar tissue has developed in the urethra causing the passageway to narrow :shrug:

Fluffy may have also developed a UTI :shrug:

Personally I would have a urine culture done to be sure and at the same time have the vet check the structure of the urethra.

:goodvibes: Good luck & let us know how it goes :fingerscr

I feed my CRF (chronic renal failure) cat a raw diet, and would highly recommend it :2cents:

Some info here: http://rawfedcats.org/

tlogan
August 14th, 2009, 02:30 PM
Thanks for the information and link. I did have Fluffy do a urine sample for the vet - actually we were running around the house together trying to catch a few drips here and there. He wasn't sure what to think of it...

He has a yeast infection (secondary) and he maybe starting renal failure - but to be sure I need to have blood-work done and to have his x-rays and results seen by a board certified veterinary surgeon to be sure if he needs another surgery to widen the opening or possible re-construction of the ureter if it is a functional problem.

I just want to make sure that he can get through this - he is a tough little kitty and I love him to bits - the cost has become over whelming - I haven't added the total but I am afraid to... I am looking at it one visit at a time seems to not be as expensive looking at it that way.
First vet visit 1,200 -
Second - 3,800
Third - 2,000
And the little visits in between ?

The second and third Vet are working collaboratively. The second Vet donated x-rays and lodging and other things otherwise it would have been more.

The procedures he had was catheterized 9 plus times, 2 surgeries to remove stones, final PU surgery - urine samples, blood-work, and not to mention the unpleasant wearing of the cone, food changes - he is still purring and grooming but can he handle anymore?

Last night I asked him to tell me what he wants and he winked at me and I really don't know if that meant it is your decision or let me go or let's go for it... (I want it to mean lets go for it):cry:
I work two jobs so another bit of money will put me behind the 8 ball and still enable me to meet the necessary commitments but the rainy day funds no longer exist. I know he is worth it. These are my children, so I have to learn when they have had enough, the vet says he seems ok and not suffering :confused:etc So we keep trudging along.

:sick:

Thank you for the link - I will bookmark and check it out

Fluffy and Tlogan

Love4himies
August 14th, 2009, 02:48 PM
So sorry to hear about Fluffy.:grouphug:

Just to let you know that Calcium Oxalate stones can't be dissolved from a food change, but the struvite ones can by adjusting the urine ph.
A food change for one stone can lead to the formation of the other type of stone.

Research (Winn foundation supported) is finding more and more cats are getting the Oxalate stones and think it is because of commercial food changing a cat's natural ph, which should be 6-6.3 to prevent the struvite stones. I'll try to find the research summary for you.

You may want to try the raw diet to keep your kitty's ph as close to natural as possible and add extra water to his diet to make sure his kidneys and bladder are able to flush out the stones before they get too big.

http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/pages/bladder_stones_obstruct_web.pdf

Tundra_Queen
August 14th, 2009, 04:14 PM
I am so sorry to hear about your fur baby. I hope the vet can figure out how to fix it and that the fix is something very simple! :grouphug:

Debbie

sugarcatmom
August 14th, 2009, 04:23 PM
We have changed the food and hope that helps - I am seriously thinking raw food diet although Vet and food reps say urinary SO is what he should be on. His crystals were calcium oscalate that this food prevents but could essentially cause struvite crystals by lowering the ph to much.

I would give the raw diet a go. Of course the vet and "food reps" are going to say stick with the prescription food :rolleyes:. I'd love to ask them what they think it is about he following ingredients that make it appropriate for ANY feline, nevermind one with a life-threatening medical condition.

Dry -

Chicken Meal, Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, Corn, Chicken Fat, Natural Flavour, Soy Protein Isolate, Powdered Cellulose, Salt, Dried Egg Powder, Dried Brewer’s Yeast,.....

Canned -

Water Sufficient for Processing, Chicken, Chicken Liver, Pork Liver, Pork By-Products, Corn Flour, Fish Oil, Powdered Cellulose, Dried Egg, Vegetable Oil, ....



Also, just to clarify, struvite crystals form in urine with a high ph (so alkaline urine, where the ph is consistently above 7), and calcium oxalate crystals form in low ph (overly acidic urine, with a ph below 6). The reason calcium oxalate crystals have become so common is because of the recent trend of adding acidifiers to dry cat food in an attempt to cancel out the alkalinification that results when cats eat high carb diets.

I'd suggest getting some ph test strips from a health food store and monitoring Fluffy's urine at home. Since ph fluctuates throughout the day, several readings at different times would give a more accurate picture than the occasional test at the vets. If you find it's too acidic or to alkaline, you can add supplements accordingly.


Thanks for the information and link. I did have Fluffy do a urine sample for the vet - actually we were running around the house together trying to catch a few drips here and there.

This wouldn't have been a sterile sample and a culture and sensitivity would be useless. The best way to get urine is with a cystocentisis, where they use a very fine needle inserted directly into the bladder. (Doesnt hurt the cat, they object more to being held on their backs).

The procedures he had was catheterized 9 plus times

That is absolutely ridiculous!! The vets should not have let this go on so long. What was he eating during all of this?


- he is still purring and grooming but can he handle anymore?

Only you can know for sure, but I would say that if he still purrs and grooms and eats okay and still has a spark in his eye, then he's probably not ready to leave this earth just yet. Do try changing his diet to something a carnivore should eat (if he aggrees ;)), and see how that goes.

All the best to you and Fluffy.

tlogan
August 15th, 2009, 05:28 PM
Thanks for the information, I am still learning - I have had cats for most of my life and this is my first cat that has had all of the trouble - The two cats have been on Veterinary prescribed food for most of their lives. S/D, C/D, Urinary SO and now Mature Formula Wet Medi-Cal. With the occasional treat that people would buy my cats to nibble on.

I was told when Fluffy was about 6 months to a 1 year old that he needed to be on dry and dry only to prevent crystals - they didn't have wet food at the time to help prevent - maintain flush out crystals (the vet told me this 8 yrs ago) -Note: not the vets fluffy currently see's.

I knew if the ph was to low or to high it would cause some sort of crystal I just got them backwards I guess - to much info going through my head right now..

Fluffy is on anti-biotics until we can get a blood culture done on Monday - he is sleeping alot and of course peeing - which is all he wanted to do in the first place. I hope he can trust that I am doing what he needs.

I am really serious about the raw diet but scared all at the same time - do I wait until I figure out what is wrong - or do I just go ahead and do it...

Back to reading

Fluffy and tlogan

sugarcatmom
August 15th, 2009, 10:29 PM
The two cats have been on Veterinary prescribed food for most of their lives. S/D, C/D, Urinary SO and now Mature Formula Wet Medi-Cal.

So the prescription diets have helped Fluffy how? Here was a previous post I wrote to you on this subject: http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?p=782010&highlight=s%2Fo#post782010


I was told when Fluffy was about 6 months to a 1 year old that he needed to be on dry and dry only to prevent crystals - they didn't have wet food at the time to help prevent - maintain flush out crystals (the vet told me this 8 yrs ago)

Absolutely tragic. http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-angry009.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)


I am really serious about the raw diet but scared all at the same time - do I wait until I figure out what is wrong - or do I just go ahead and do it...

No reason not to try introducing some raw right now to see if Fluffy will recognize it as food. Have you ever offered him some fresh meat in the past? If you want, start with some lightly boiled chicken breast as a treat and gradually cook it less and less. Eventually you can offer some balanced pre-made raw from a pet food store, and then move on to making your own if you're up for it.