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People with more then 1 dog

MTD
August 5th, 2009, 11:39 PM
Hi everyone. I am looing for some info from those of you that have more then 1 dog.

I have a 2 year old Miniature Pinscher. She is a great dog, Very smart and obedient, no issues with her behaviour and she gets along great with other dogs and people.

My wife and I are considering getting another dog, possibly another Min Pin or something similar. Id like a Doberman, but she wants a small or medium sized dog.

Anyway, our concern is that if we get another dog, if the 2 of them will have issues getting along with each other and that if our current dog might start misbehaving if we get another dog.

THoughts or advice would be appreciated.

Bailey_
August 5th, 2009, 11:45 PM
Bringing another dog into the home is without a doubt more work, more training, double the finances and vet bills, etc.

It's usually a good rule of thumb to introduce a new dog when the first dog is around the age of three, generally most dogs have reached a stable and mental maturity by that point.
If you feel however that your current dog has good in-home manners, is obedient and likes other dogs, I don't really forsee any issues with you bringing a new dog into the mix as long as the new dog is also stable and has no issues from a past history. (I'm assuming you are going with a puppy?)

It's important to be consistant with both dogs however - if one feels that the other is pushing boundaries with you, this is when behavior can get a little out of control and more difficult.

As far as what breed, that is entirely up to you and your wife. Dogs don't compare one another on size, so regardless of whether you get a Doberman, your min-pin will most likely still hold her ground.

hazelrunpack
August 5th, 2009, 11:45 PM
As long as you make sure they get the proper training and plenty of loving, there's no reason two can't get along well without any behavioral issues. The one exception might be if you're intending on getting a puppy...a two-year-old may find puppy's bad habits hard to resist! :laughing: But even that temptation can be controlled if you make sure to keep up on the training. :thumbs up

It's a good idea to let any potential addition and your current dog meet on neutral ground before bringing any newbie home--if the two are incompatible and won't get along, you want to know it before you commit to the newbie.

MTD
August 5th, 2009, 11:56 PM
Great thanks. Im hoping that the fact that she gets along great with other dogs would help transitioning her into having a friend in the home. She really has no bad habits. She has never chewed anything up besides her own toys and she was house trained and took to being alone in her crate very easily.

Now Im wondering, would another female or male be preferred? Ive read the females are easier to train and better behaved, but Im wondering if 2 females would get along better then 1 of each.

Would getting another puppy from the same breeder make a difference? Would they know they were related and would it make a difference? The breeder was great and I was thinking that another puppy from the same breeder and from the same family might have the same good traits that she has now.

kashtin's kin
August 6th, 2009, 12:31 AM
Lotsa good advice above, and more doubtless to follow. We've had 2-3 dogs for the past few years, and I think one of the most important things is spending time with critters-whatever the situation-but in times of stress/change, simply being there to monitor and encourage/insist on 'decent' social etc. behaviour.

Sounds like things have gone well with the min pin, so I'm assuming you (and partner) are established 'alphas' in the domestic pecking order...which is how things should be (this spoken by a critterslave, BUT our 3 dogs/7 inside cats/2outside!! ponies know where they ultimately stand, and thus rarely step seriously outta line).

After working with kids for many years, I know they're not critters, but there are a lot of parallels. Being with kids/critters, setting clear boundries-heck, even 'role modelling' to a certain extent; all this contributes to a more harmonious household, in all ways (everyone behaving, everyone content/safe etc.).

We'd always had female dogs, until we threw a youngish huge Lab boy into the mix-of one small 8 yr. old dog, and one crabby 15 yr. old senior dog. We've had to (and still do, daily) monitor the senior and the boy; nothing serious, just have to make sure the senior knows she's still 'top dog' (but doesn't havethe right to crabbily nip the boy), and keep the boy from getting too rambunctious with the senior...he sort of thinks HE'S top dog, but is so easy-going and affable that he doesn't push the issue.

Years ago, with 2 similarly aged/sized females, I fostered a very enthusiastic but 'unsocialized' 1 yr. old female lab; the lab needed some real attention in terms of learning to live inside, and calming down/focusing. Things were a bit BUSY for a while, but again, having someone home to supervise the dogs (or having them crated, but not for lengthy periods) was key to creating a 'successful' mix everyone could live with.

The fact that you're thinking ahead, anticipating issues etc. is likely a very good predictor of the smooth integration of whatever dog you may acquire. All change, good or bad, can rattle people and critters, and throw them off their stride for a while...but by planning carefully, and being aware of possible conflicts, things should go well for your family of people and dog[s]. Just be sure to spend that quality AND quantity! time, especially for the first while. Best of luck with whatever you do!

p.s. often, an older dog can help 'train' a younger one...but be aware-I've had the younger one also try to corrupt the older critter!!

hazelrunpack
August 6th, 2009, 10:06 AM
How is your current dog around other canines? If she interacts well with other dogs, you'll have less to worry about.

We have a mix of genders here--started with a fem, added two boys as pups, added three girls (all about 18 months of age), then another male and finally another female. In our experience, the males are harder to integrate into the Pack than the girls--they seem to be more sensitive about status in the Pack. But since you already have a female, gender probably won't create an issue no matter which way you go.

As for staying with the same breeder, just be aware that even pups from the same litter can have totally different personalities. But if you keep up with the training and maintain the discipline, there's no reason to believe that you can't successfully integrate even a pup with an outgoing and rambunctious personality.

And I missed it during my read through your first post--but I have to go with your wife on the size of the new dog. Min pins can be a little fragile, so think small. Remember that it will take puppy a little while to learn its bounds and you wouldn't want your current girl to get hurt in the process.

Bailey_
August 6th, 2009, 11:35 AM
As far as a dog knowing they are related - no - they aren't capable of putting those things together. Dogs create bonds, so if you were to get two puppies from the same litter, you would have two dogs that would grow up knowing one another from the earliest of all ages and thus they would have a very, very strong bond.
However if you were to introduce your female to one of her littermates now, chances are while they'd get along, they don't understand that they are brother or sister the way we as humans understand this.

When dogs make introductions, by sniffing one another and checking eachother out, they're able to tell a LOT about the other dog. But as far as checking to see who the other dogs parents are? Not so much.

I'm probably going to be outnumbered when I tell you this, but I also highly disagree with the thought that a smaller breed dog will be better for your home just because you have a small breed dog now. The fact is, big dogs and small dogs CAN easily live in the same house. Dogs teach one another what is safe play and what is not, and I have no doubt in my mind that if you were to bring a large breed puppy into your home that your MinPin would teach it manners, especially if you get a puppy. Many people assume that because a puppy is rambunctious or excitable, that it's big bouncy play will injure a small dog, but big dog/small dog injuries are more common with two adult dogs that don't know one another.
The fact is that a healthy puppy absolutley 100% respects what an older dog is telling it - regardless of how large it is. Your MinPin will be able to tell a bigger breed puppy what is 'okay' play, how rough of play she will tolerate, and she'll set boundaries for the puppy. (This will happen regardless of your decision to get a big breed pup or another MinPin.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqTTm3OptOg


The only thing I want to add is that regardless of whether or not your current Min Pin was easily trainable, your next addition may not be - even if you get the dog from the same breeder with the same family lines as your female. This doesn't mean the dog wouldn't have the same great traits as your current dog, but every dog is different, learns differently and at various speeds.
As long as you're aware and prepared for the possibility that training your new dog may present a variety of it's own very unique challenges that you may not have had to deal with from your female, I'd say it sounds like you and your wife are ready to bring home a new dog. :thumbs up

BenMax
August 6th, 2009, 12:39 PM
Oh this thread is just up my alley!:laughing:

Let me start off saying that I have a 3 year old min pin (that I totally foster failed with) and she had (and still has) issues.

During this past year and a bit, I have continued to foster dogs of all sizes, all issues, all breeds. Julia adapted very well to all, regardless of size. She has always introduced herself as 'top dawg' and maintained that position with each and every dog that came to my home.

What I have noticed however, is that min pins are very possessive. They are territorial and it takes them time to 'accept' sharing attention with another. It does however tapper off after all feel secure.

I also have had an equal amount of small dogs (almost her size) and big dogs (a collie and doberman) fostered with Julia. Julia was more playful and content with the smaller dogs than the larger ones. With the big dogs, I always was worried about rough housing with Julia who is only 5 lbs. Knowing that something innocent in play could very well put her in danger was constantly on my mind, and I spent alot of my time and energy monitoring the play.

So you will be fine with big or small. You must consider however the compatibility of whatever dog you chose. My advice is as such:

Foster! Go to a rescue group and foster before you adopt or purchase a pup from a breeder. Also, if you are considering another min pin - there is an excellent rescue group in Ontario that specialize and take in only min pins. For your research - look into the Ottawa area for this rescue group - they are #1, A-class.

Frenchy
August 6th, 2009, 02:32 PM
With a rescue , it would be easier for you to find the right match. You can go and meet foster dogs with your own dog and see if they are ok with each others.

Male versus female , doesn't really make a difference. What you need to look for is dominant or submissive. If your dog is dominant , then you must find a submissive dog. If your dog is submissive , you can choose between either another submissive one or a bit dominant. And always remember that dogs are like people , your dog may not like one just because ... well .... she doesn't like the other's attitude :p

Mat&Murph
August 6th, 2009, 02:37 PM
Hey I have 2 boys but I got them the same time. But you have got Awsome advice so far from great ppl who know

Purpledomino
August 6th, 2009, 02:41 PM
Is your female spayed? If she is you will have better success at introducing another dog into the home, however I do suggest a male anyway. I have three Minpins, and the ONLY real squabbles we have around here are between my two females (spayed).
I also recommend getting another of a similar size, only because they are a VERY active breed and will really enjoy playing and roughousing together, which is a good thing to help burn off steam around the house. This is handy during the winter when there are not many good "walk" days because of the weather. I also own two giant breed dogs, and although they get along very well with the Minpins, I keep them separate most of the time just because of the size difference.
My bullmastiff has stepped on their tiny feet before completely by accident, and judging by the screams of a Minpin being stepped on by a 166 lb dog, it is just best not to take chances, even though my Bully wouldn't harm a fly. Minpins are delicate and even if they get along famously with larger breeds, they would need to be babysat in the company of larger breeds which could harm them without intending to. You also must realize that Minpins can get themselves into trouble due to their feisty nature, and should a larger breed take them up on a challenge a tiny dog is at a great disadvantage, and the effects could be devastating.

rainbow
August 6th, 2009, 03:11 PM
Everyone has given you lots of good advice. :thumbs up

The only thing that I would repeat is to take your dog along with you and let her make the decision. :)

BenMax
August 6th, 2009, 03:38 PM
I also recommend getting another of a similar size, only because they are a VERY active breed and will really enjoy playing and roughousing together, which is a good thing to help burn off steam around the house. This is handy during the winter when there are not many good "walk" days because of the weather. I also own two giant breed dogs, and although they get along very well with the Minpins, I keep them separate most of the time just because of the size difference.
My bullmastiff has stepped on their tiny feet before completely by accident, and judging by the screams of a Minpin being stepped on by a 166 lb dog, it is just best not to take chances, even though my Bully wouldn't harm a fly. Minpins are delicate and even if they get along famously with larger breeds, they would need to be babysat in the company of larger breeds which could harm them without intending to. You also must realize that Minpins can get themselves into trouble due to their feisty nature, and should a larger breed take them up on a challenge a tiny dog is at a great disadvantage, and the effects could be devastating.

I have to agree 100% with this comment. Even though the bigger dogs have no intention to deliberately hurt the wee ones -it happens. If the leg of a min pin is broken, it could very well lead to an amputation. Also, mini pins are also suseptible to back injuries as well. These dogs are big in mind, but still small in stature. To enjoy your dogs and not worry about injury - go small.

MTD
August 7th, 2009, 08:00 PM
Thanks everyone for all the kind words and advice. We have decided that we will be gettign another and more then likely another Min Pin. Neither of us has really found many other smaller dogs that we like unless someone has some suggestions.

We are looking for a smaller dog, under 20 lbs with easy grooming needs. A dog that is easier to train and good with people.

The breeder we got our current Min Pin from doesnt have any pups or any planned, so Im looking at a few other breeders in my area.

Bailey_
August 7th, 2009, 08:09 PM
I'd say another MinPin would be a great choice.

Other small breeds that might be suited to what you're looking for could be Jack Russells, Dachshunds, Miniature or Toy Poodles, Miniature Schnauzers, Boston Terriers, or an Italian Greyhound.

You do have a lot of options if you're looking for a small breed dog and aren't set on a MinPin. Here's a great site that could give you more basic insight onto breeds you may like. http://www.allsmalldogbreeds.com/popular-small-dogs.html

Purpledomino
August 7th, 2009, 10:13 PM
This is a good rescue site for Miniature Pinschers.

http://www.minpinrescue.org/dogs1.html#CAN

MIA
August 8th, 2009, 12:24 AM
Too bad you aren't in BC, I am fostering the sweetest MinPin ever! LOL Just for reference, I have two MinPins and a Doberman, and foster both! My house is Pinscher heaven!!!!

BenMax
August 8th, 2009, 09:59 AM
Seriously, I would be checking out the min pin rescue in Ontario. They get many of these little ones and you will be surprised how gorgeous and problem free some of them are. Don't miss an opportunity to rescue one in need. Once one is adopted, it gives them an opportunity to save another. There is many ages also. If you own a min pin then you know that not everyone can handle this breed. For this reason the min pin is a very desired breed yet a very 'thrown away' breed as well. Also remember, these dogs originally came from breeders of sorts at some point of their lives.

Check it out and save a life.

BTW - shelters also get them. They are not anymore 'special' to be dumped at pounds and shelters.

MyBirdIsEvil
August 8th, 2009, 11:24 PM
Another minpin would be a good idea.

There's no need to buy from a breeder when there's SO MANY minpins at shelters and in need of rescue. Some of them don't even have any issues, people just couldn't deal with the high energy. For that matter some people give up their dogs for reasons as minuscule as they didn't stay as small as they wanted :wall:
I don't think there's a necessity as far as sex. It has more to do with the individual dogs temperament.
If you find a minpin that has an easygoing temperament just like yours you shouldn't have any problems. Let the dogs meet, interact, and play a few times (or more) before you bring them home and you should get an idea of whether they have a chance of living together peacefully.

ScottieDog
August 11th, 2009, 04:19 PM
We introduced our female rescue Scottie to our male Scottie when he was 6 (she was 4). We did the introductions outdoors on neutral territory. I won't say the my two were the best of friends at first; my male basically took a "leave me alone" attitude. Except for what is known as the "animal cracker incident" we had no fights, biting or baring of teeth. Our male was the alpha of the dogs and he got first choice of treats, toys and his food bowl placed before him first. Our little girl respected his status, but they never really played much together. When our little girl got critically ill, our male became very protective of her. When she passed away, we debated on introducing another dog to our family. We would see how our male reacted to other dogs and how excited he was when around them. We brought a 2 1/2 year-old female into our family in December; our male was 13 at the time. I have to say they bonded the first day. Mac walked over to Cass and placed a paw on her shoulder, looked at her and walked away. Cassie has brought new life to my old boy.

Don't discount your breeder. Good breeders don't typically have pups available, but they can help you find a dog of your breed. Most have contracts to take back dogs they bred if the owners can't care for them. They are also frequently involved with rescue. And they can tell you who may have pups or a planned litter. Good breeders know the other good breeders since they may want to stud a dog, etc. We found our new dog because I tracked down my male's breeder and asked about puppies. She didn't have puppies, but had an adult female she had kept who just was not to her breeding standards and was willing to place her if the right family came along. We were interviewed, had an introductory visit, etc. before we were picked as "the right family". And we already had one of her dogs.

Rescue can also match you to a dog that will be a good fit to your family. You have a 2 year-old, so you may even wish to consider a dog a year or so older or younger. Be prepared to wait to find the right dog. It took us over 8 months of looking, calling, applying etc. to find our rescue. Boy was she worth the wait!

One thing I want to stress is that you must address any behavior issues your current dog has before bringing a second dog home. We focused on Mac's issues before bringing our rescue home.

As far as getting a female or male, if the dogs are altered, you shouldn't have too many issues. Obviously you do not want an unaltered male and unspayed female in the same family. I have heard that unspayed females are more prone to fighting in my breed, but I have no experience with this.

Good luck finding your new family member.