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Info required - bequeathing cats and $

14+kitties
July 8th, 2009, 10:36 AM
I have recently had a customer asking me if I know of any place in Ontario, preferably Niagara region, that would guarantee her that her cats would be looked after in the event of her and her husband's death. For that she would bequeath a sizable amount of money for their care. There, of course, would be stipulations involved for the use of this money. They want reassurances whoever agrees to take the cats would not simply put the cats down and spend the money.
Seeing as I don't know of any such place I thought I would throw it out there and see if anyone else did.

Sylvie
July 8th, 2009, 10:41 AM
Sorry 14+, I do not know the answer to this question, but I am interested in that answer.

14+kitties
July 8th, 2009, 10:51 AM
Me too. I had told her before I would consider taking her cats in but I have a feeling she may outlive me!! :rolleyes: I *think* she is in her early 70's but is very active.

BenMax
July 8th, 2009, 01:03 PM
There should be an executer to ensure that all guidelines are followed to the 'T' outside of this rescue. Maybe set up a trust fund for the cats as well to ensure that they are getting the proper care.

Also, whatever rescue she decides on, she should request full disclosure of all financial matters and all policies. There should also be a board of directors.

There are many great cat organizations I am certain. I know of only one that takes in ferals and I trust him 150%. Wherever she turns to - she should have a list of questions about the rescue and have access to whatever she wants to ensure that her felines will be well cared for.

Really - you need to ask alot of questions. This would include the volunteers, the board, president and also adopters. Always keep your ears open.

Shaykeija
July 8th, 2009, 08:16 PM
hmmmm if we were to die right now the critters would be well off. We tied everything up with someone we trust. The money goes into a trust fund, our appointed guardian looks after them. Any medical stuff has to be passed by the trustee and the animals must live out a healthy, happy life. All bills are paid by the trustee and the vets appointed, give reports back to the trustee. Vets visits 2 x per year or as often as needed. After the last surviving animal dies, the trust is broken up in to 3. 30 percent goes to the guardian and 60 percent to a animal rescue and 10 percent to the trustee. Any frigging around, the lawyers get involved. As for family..(blood sucking leeches) I left them all 50 cents, they can all call 1-800-Eat-Dirt...

Tundra_Queen
July 11th, 2009, 04:13 AM
She could ask her lawyer. She might be able to word it correctly in the will so they have to look after the cats or they don't continue to get the money. Maybe sending a yearly or six month vet report to the lawyer?

Debbie

14+kitties
July 11th, 2009, 07:57 AM
So does anyone know of any particular organizations that will take the cats? At this point that is what she is worried about.

Winston
July 11th, 2009, 08:30 AM
Hmm 14+ I think you would be hard pressed to find any organization that would honor that regardless of a will or instructions. In reality I think what happens is if the persons family/trustee doesnt deal with it then the animals would likely be taken by animal control.

BMDLuver
July 11th, 2009, 10:09 AM
So does anyone know of any particular organizations that will take the cats? At this point that is what she is worried about.

I would think that Westminister Pet Sanctuary would be a great place to approach about this. They are well set up for cats living out their lives with them.

14+kitties
July 11th, 2009, 10:18 AM
I would think that Westminister Pet Sanctuary would be a great place to approach about this. They are well set up for cats living out their lives with them.

Thank you BMDLuver! Could you tell me where that is located?

14+kitties
July 11th, 2009, 10:38 AM
I just checked it out. Not sure if this is what she had in mind. She was more concerned with them living thier lives in one home. Not being placed somewhere where they may be rehomed.
I will let her know about it and see if she is interested in checking it out. Thanks again!

hazelrunpack
July 11th, 2009, 10:50 AM
How many cats does she have, 14+?

14+kitties
July 11th, 2009, 07:48 PM
How many cats does she have, 14+?

Two. That is the number she will always have. I have thought about offering but don't want her thinking it's for the money. It's a sizable amount.

Love4himies
July 11th, 2009, 08:23 PM
To me, that is a question for her relatives. I have ensured my daughter if anything happens to her, her two kitties will stay together with me.

My co-worker has asked me to take care of her three cats should something happen to her. They don't have to be adopted together, but that I will ensure they go to good homes.

Love4himies
July 11th, 2009, 08:24 PM
Two. That is the number she will always have. I have thought about offering but don't want her thinking it's for the money. It's a sizable amount.

It sounds like she trusts you, maybe she was waiting for the offer :shrug:

14+kitties
July 11th, 2009, 08:41 PM
To me, that is a question for her relatives. I have ensured my daughter if anything happens to her, her two kitties will stay together with me.

My co-worker has asked me to take care of her three cats should something happen to her. They don't have to be adopted together, but that I will ensure they go to good homes.


She has no children L4. Or any relatives she is close to that I know of.
I jokingly had said I would take the cats quite some time ago. I really think if I had it set up so she knew they would be safe she would be ok with that. I will have to look into it. I just thought there may be some organization around that would be better for her. :shrug:

SnowDancer
July 12th, 2009, 12:17 AM
Unfortunately pets are considered chattels. We have provided for our dog in our wills - Plan A person and Plan B - just in case something happens to Plan A person - or she is not in a position to take our dog should something happen to us. But you need to choose your people wisely because they could take the money and not the pets. There are many people who die certain that their children/grandchildren will care for their beloved pets - who sadly dump the pets on the way to picking up their inheritances. I think setting up a trust if feasible is the way to go. $$$ wise in our case so much would depend on when we died and how - life insurance etc. - if we died tomorrow we would be worth a lot more than we would be in 10 years - but our assets would first go to the care of our dog. We are 59 and 60 - our dog is just over 5 - and he will be our last dog - provided he lives to the 15 to 18 years that is possible for his breed - because of this very worry.

hazelrunpack
July 12th, 2009, 12:30 AM
It sounds like she doesn't really have any close family around her to trust, 14+? In that case, I think you should go ahead and make the offer if you have room and the inclination. She couldn't ask for a more caring guardian for her kitties--and if the fates are willing, it won't ever become a problem because she'll outlive her little sweeties!

But if making the arrangements would put her heart at ease and you're really serious about it, then imo you should make the offer. :thumbs up The worst that could happen is that she says "no"! :shrug:

14+kitties
July 12th, 2009, 08:06 AM
It sounds like she doesn't really have any close family around her to trust, 14+? In that case, I think you should go ahead and make the offer if you have room and the inclination. She couldn't ask for a more caring guardian for her kitties--and if the fates are willing, it won't ever become a problem because she'll outlive her little sweeties!

But if making the arrangements would put her heart at ease and you're really serious about it, then imo you should make the offer. :thumbs up The worst that could happen is that she says "no"! :shrug:

:o Thanks hazel.
Unfortunately the "outliving her sweeties" would never happen. She has said that she will always have cats around. That was her biggest concern. Young cats and her getting older. I suggested when the two she has go that she starts adopting older cats - 6, 7, 8 year olds. They still have lots of love to share and may be the answer to her "problem".
:eek:That isn't quite as cold hearted as it seems after typing it out but I can't think of an easier way to type it. :shrug:

hazelrunpack
July 12th, 2009, 11:41 AM
I don't think it's coldhearted at all--I know some seniors that have adopted older cats for just that reason :thumbs up

kiara
July 12th, 2009, 12:21 PM
This is something we don't think about, but it is a great subject to discuss. I would imagine this should be a part of your will and everything should be in writing, including relatives' or friends' names and marking the amount of money included for each pet. Maybe a lawyer also should be a part of this deal to ensure that the cats, or dogs are taken to a vet once a year for a check-up and vaccines. Fed good quality food, get looked after by a vet if they get sick etc... Also you could make arrangements with a good rescue group that they would take your pets in, in case of death, for them to be adopted. It would be nice to include a money donation, so that other pets could be rescued. It brings to mind, this poor woman that called our cat rescue, deperately looking to place her cat, as she had emphysema. We could not help her, but she told me that she had six children. None of them wanted to help her. I thought " What six little darlings you got". If she was giving money away I'm sure they would all be at the door!!!!

sugarcatmom
July 12th, 2009, 03:33 PM
There's an interesting article in the latest issue of Animal Wellness Magazine (http://www.animalwellnessmagazine.com/r/toc.htm) on this very topic. In the U.S., you can set up a Pet Protection Agreement, which is a legally binding document covering everything from the naming of the guardian to the pet's daily routine and amount of funding. It's binding in all 50 states and takes effect immediately upon death/injury/illness (unlike a will, which takes time to go through probate).

Alternatively, one can set up a Freestanding Traditional Pet Trust, which is what you want if you believe someone might contest your will. 41 states (http://www.professorbeyer.com/Articles/Animal_Statutes.htm) also have statutes governing pet trusts initiated by a statement in the will, which mean that the money and the animal must stay together when both are bequeathed to a specific person.

It's not so easy in Canada to make provisions for your pets. Unfortunately trust funds for animals up here are unenforceable. "You can request that your animal be delivered to your estate trustee upon your demise. The trustee's role is to find a good home for your animal and to provide a legacy to the person to care for him." (Audi Donamor, founder of Smiling Blue Skies Cancer Fund). Here are some tips from the article, courtesy of Toronto lawyer Mary MacGregor:


Find 2 responsible friends or relatives to be temporary caregivers upon your death. They should have keys, feeding and care instructions, name and # of your vet, and info on long term care.

Neighbors, friends and relatives should know how many animals there are and the names of the temporary caregivers.

The animal guardian should carry a wallet card listing the names and numbers of emergency animal caregivers.

As an alert to emergency response teams, notices should be places on doors and windows of a home, indicating the type and number of animals inside. http://www.aspca.org/about-us/free-aspca-stuff/free-pet-safety-pack.html

Emergency contact names and numbers should be listed on the inside of the front and back doors.