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My dog will NOT stop stealing food

punkwood
June 24th, 2009, 12:08 PM
I have 3 year old female Beagle / Terrier mix. No matter what we have tried, she absolutely will not stop getting in the trash, or stealing food. She steals food right in front of us, even out of our hands.. Nothing stops or even slows her down. She always has fresh food and water, so I know she isnt doing it out of hunger.
To compound the issue, she is a very submissive urinator, and half the time you even raise your voice to her, she urinates.
If anyone has any REALISTIC advice for me, I would really appreciate it. I only say realistic because previous advice I've gotten has ranged from "let her do it" to "change your families lifestyle to accommodate her". I need real-life solutions that dont involve rearranging my life for a pet.

Thanks for your help.

bendyfoot
June 24th, 2009, 12:30 PM
Sorry, but my recommendation was "change your family's lifestyle to accomodate her"...:o

It doesn't have to be complicated...we have a huge garbage-hunter/food stealer too. What have we adjusted?

1. Put garbage in bins with tight fitting lids or in cupboards (the dog can't open cupboard doors...unfortunately our cats can so we now only use garbage cans with lids, the kind that you push a lever with your foot).

2. When thawing food for dinner, put it in a cupboard, fridge, microwave or oven.

3. don't leave other food items on tables or counters

IMO, if you have a dog that's hugely motivated by food, it's your job to keep it out of reach. It's no different than keeping dangerous things like electrical cables out of reach of a curious, explorative puppy. :2cents:

That said, taking things out of your hands is an ABSOLUTE NO-NO and downright bad manners...this would not be tolerated in our house and the dogs know it. This tells me that you need to work on basic manners (obedience) with your dog and reestablish the role of the humans as the leaders of the household...it tells me that your dog thinks he's boss....and yes, even bossy dogs can be "submissive" urinators...we've got one of those too. It can be a very effective distraction technique if it stops the scolding...you might want to consider other ways of managing the behaviour.

allfurlove
June 24th, 2009, 12:36 PM
I have 3 year old female Beagle / Terrier mix. No matter what we have tried, she absolutely will not stop getting in the trash, or stealing food. She steals food right in front of us, even out of our hands.. Nothing stops or even slows her down. She always has fresh food and water, so I know she isnt doing it out of hunger.
To compound the issue, she is a very submissive urinator, and half the time you even raise your voice to her, she urinates.
If anyone has any REALISTIC advice for me, I would really appreciate it. I only say realistic because previous advice I've gotten has ranged from "let her do it" to "change your families lifestyle to accommodate her". I need real-life solutions that dont involve rearranging my life for a pet.

Thanks for your help.

Ok, I know you are probably very frustrated at this point, but YOU need to be realistic. To solve your problem, things need to change. You don't need to rearrange your lifestyle, just a few small things.
1 Get a garbage can with a good lid that she cant get into, keep it outside, or in a closet. Lots of dog owners have to do this. One of my adopted dogs was surrendered to the shelter by her past owners because she wouldnt stop going in the garbage. You just cant give them the opportunity...and problem solved :thumbs up

2 Confine her to a crate or room while you eat. Since she is a beagle and will always follow her nose, she needs you to set the boundaries.

3 Provide her with an interactive way of aquiring her food. You can buy balls that you fill with kibble and they have to roll it around and the kibble slowly comes out one piece at a time. This will mentally stimulate her and make her a happier doggy.

None of these things require you to rearrange your lifestyle, just a couple mins a day for peace of mind :shrug: I dont know what other people have told you that you are so upset about

bendyfoot
June 24th, 2009, 12:55 PM
oh, the crate is a good idea. Since we don't have crates out with our adult dogs (we only use them with pups) our spin on that is (we put down a big blanket on the floor and that becomes the dogs' "stay there" spot during the meal...at least until Grandma or someone calls them over to give them scraps :rolleyes: I find it helpful to give them a defined space to go to rather than just "lie down" wherever when they're feeling very tempted.

ETA: also, never ever ever ever feed (or allow the kids to feed) the dogs food that people are eating EVER (I won't say "no people food" b/c we feed our dogs "people food" as their regular meals)....so I mean only what people are consuming at that moment. No scraps, no licks of popsicles, NEVER, not even on your terms. Dogs eat out of dog bowls or in designated areas only, otherwise you're sending mixed messages IMO.

Frenchy
June 24th, 2009, 01:33 PM
Sorry, but my recommendation was "change your family's lifestyle to accomodate her"...:o



Ditto bendyfoot !

Dogs can't have access to garbages or human food. I don't see why it would be any other way.

If a dog eats socks , don't let socks around the house .... same with food and garbage ! Simple ! :cool:

ancientgirl
June 24th, 2009, 02:21 PM
I've seen trash cans with locks on them. I saw one at The Container Store. It was a bit pricey, but looks like it would work with dogs. I myself have a can with a button that opens it.

I have cats, so I also have to keep an eye on my food at times. I agree with the others, you need to actively and consciously also not give her reason to be tempted. I used to have a cookie jar, to keep their treats. Well, until they figured out how to knock the top off the jar, now I keep their treats as well as all of my cleaning supplies in the dish washer. THAT they haven't figured out yet.

Sylvie
June 24th, 2009, 08:31 PM
I am with everyone else. You must keep the garbage and food away from the dog.

Until we fostered Greta, we never had to dogproof the house. As Bendyfoot does, we use crates for puppies, therefore teach the dog from the beginning. My other 3 do not get into anything.

Bendyfoot, Greta opens cupboard doors. Opens the microwave and did too many things to mention. However, we did not give up on her and have had to make a few changes. Not to accomodate the dog but to make life for both Greta and us a little happier.

There is no simple solution, but you must keep working at it until you find something that works. :thumbs up

bendyfoot
June 25th, 2009, 08:31 AM
Bendyfoot, Greta opens cupboard doors. Opens the microwave and did too many things to mention. However, we did not give up on her and have had to make a few changes. Not to accomodate the dog but to make life for both Greta and us a little happier.


Oh, I meant MY dogs can't open cupboard doors, I know many others figure that trick out. OMG I can't IMAGINE a pet that can get into a microwave!!!:eek: Clever :evil:
:laughing:

dullmau
June 27th, 2009, 03:04 PM
i'm not all-time animal rights supporter.

In the case, i'd try electronic shock dog collar. Just let it go for a trash, and as it enjoys its rubbish, you press a bottom on your remote control and pretend nothing happens. I believe that is controversial, but from the experience that my friend stopped his dog barking at midnight, it's very effective. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_collar )

Frenchy
June 27th, 2009, 03:09 PM
i'm not all-time animal rights supporter.

In the case, i'd try electronic shock dog collar. Just let it go for a trash, and as it enjoys its rubbish, you press a bottom on your remote control and pretend nothing happens. I believe that is controversial, but from the experience that my friend stopped his dog barking at midnight, it's very effective. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_collar )

wtf ? shock collars are for morons who don't want to take the time to train their dogs. It should be illegal !

ancientgirl
June 27th, 2009, 03:31 PM
i'm not all-time animal rights supporter.

In the case, i'd try electronic shock dog collar. Just let it go for a trash, and as it enjoys its rubbish, you press a bottom on your remote control and pretend nothing happens. I believe that is controversial, but from the experience that my friend stopped his dog barking at midnight, it's very effective. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_collar )

You're kidding right?

luckypenny
June 27th, 2009, 03:42 PM
In case you haven't noticed dullmau, this is a dog training/behavior forum, NOT a sadism forum :mad:.

aslan
June 27th, 2009, 04:17 PM
i'm not all-time animal rights supporter.

In the case, i'd try electronic shock dog collar. Just let it go for a trash, and as it enjoys its rubbish, you press a bottom on your remote control and pretend nothing happens. I believe that is controversial, but from the experience that my friend stopped his dog barking at midnight, it's very effective. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_collar )

oh please ladies i can't believe you wasted your precioous time responding to anyone who would post a comment like this. Go grab a drink and go out in the sun. Morons bore easily and this twit will go away.

dullmau
June 28th, 2009, 02:48 AM
yeah, it's controversial i know it. If you don't like it, try a water gun or a can with a lot of coins inside to make a noise.

They don't like all of them but they won't tell you which one is the least detestable. It's really up to a dog's owner to make a choice on it. Be aware of peer pressure too. :grouphug:

Schalke et al. study

Schalke et al.'s study sought to investigate whether stress is caused by the use of electronic collars, in an attempt to evaluate their impact on animal welfare. (Schalke et al. 2007) Heart rate and saliva cortisol were used to determine the stress levels in three groups of dogs: those who received a shock whenever they performed a specific behavior; those who received a shock when they did not obey a command; and those who received random shocks. The first group did not show a significant rise in cortisol levels; the other two groups did show a significant rise, with the third group showing the highest level of cortisol.

From this the researchers concluded that the dogs who could clearly associate the shock with their action, and as a result were able to predict and control whether they received a shock, did not suffer from considerable or persistent stress. The evidence of increased stress in the other groups was felt to support earlier findings that poor timing and/or inappropriate use of a shock collar puts the dog at high risk of severe and ongoing stress. They conclude that "the general use of electronic shock collars is not consistent with animal welfare."

Longblades
June 28th, 2009, 12:20 PM
electronic collars,e-collars have come a long way from when they were first introduced and did only have a shock feature. Now most are coupled with a vibration or a tone. The shock stimulus can be adjusted from very low to higher and need not be used at all if the tone or vibration work. Many invisible fence companies use the same technology. Other collars employ a spray of liquid to accomplish their goal.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T48-4MJBTD3-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=d9816e91b9d460f81cac91c5d8630371 a link to the excerpt quoted in the post above, Schalke.

It does seem though, that putting the trash can in another room, or locking it, would be the preferable way to go. Otherwise a smart dog might become collar wise and learn the shock or tone or vibration or spray, cannot be administered if the collar is not on and a person is not present.

dullmau
June 28th, 2009, 03:14 PM
Thanks Longblades for being rational. The information is useful.
I think we, as pet owners, often put ourselves too much on pets' shoes and lazily assume that everything bad to us is wrong to them too. In some other cases, we simply rely too much on grandmother's wisdom without further investigation.

I've heard many misconceptions: crating training is cruel; overdosage of vitamin c is lethal; eating poop means a dog is poorly fed; having salty food in any quantity will damage their kidney; having a raw carrot can cause diarrhea; all human meds can't be given to dogs, etc.

It was okay in the past when looking up further information was difficult, but we have google now. :goodvibes: