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Wild Morning Glory/Bindweed

Dee-O-Gee
June 4th, 2009, 08:37 PM
I have had this STUPID wild morning glory in my one flower bed for a couple years now!! It has completely taken over all the beautiful flowers that have grown there for many years. I recently "googled" it and found that bindweed has roots that will travel in excess of 40 feet! :eek:

I also found that if you paint either round-up or killex on the leaves (once a week with a small brush) that eventually it will seep down into the roots and exhaust it. I have done this for about a month now and it has helped somewhat.

Does anyone here know other methods of ridding this strangling obnoxious weed? Here are a couple pictures.

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Last year, I tried to lay down landscaping fabric and mounded on mulch but that only smothered/killed my spring time perennials. :yell:

CearaQC
June 4th, 2009, 08:57 PM
There are a few options

Catch them when they are young. Pull and keep pulling. Eventually you will weaken them.

Heavily mulch in the fall with manure and straw, or leaf mold if you have it. (Leaf mold is just composted tree leaves, which takes a bit longer than regular compost.) If you starve the bindweed of light then it doesn't stand a chance. Plus the rest of your garden will thank you for all the nice moisture retention and nutrients!

Alternately you can pull up all your perennials and put them into a new bed while you sun-sterilize the soil with black plastic for a year.

Or remove the top soil and replace with new and mulch.

Space your plants according to their max maturity size so they overlap any exposed soil and shade out opportunities for any new weeds.

Dee-O-Gee
June 4th, 2009, 09:40 PM
There are a few options

Catch them when they are young. Pull and keep pulling. Eventually you will weaken them.

I've been doing this for two years and it ended up multiplying times a 1000! :evil: Then I read that the more you try to pull them out, it divides the roots and grows more. :yell:

Heavily mulch in the fall with manure and straw, or leaf mold if you have it. (Leaf mold is just composted tree leaves, which takes a bit longer than regular compost.)

I haven't tried the heavy mulch in the fall. Note to self :thumbs up

If you starve the bindweed of light then it doesn't stand a chance. I tried to starve it with landscaping fabric and mulch last summer--bad time I guess? Plus the rest of your garden will thank you for all the nice moisture retention and nutrients!

Alternately you can pull up all your perennials and put them into a new bed while you sun-sterilize the soil with black plastic for a year. Ho hum...last resort. :sad:
Or remove the top soil and replace with new and mulch.

Space your plants according to their max maturity size so they overlap any exposed soil and shade out opportunities for any new weeds.

Thank you very much CearaQC for the advise. I think I'll try the fall mulch next but should I try taking up the landscaping fabric before doing this?