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I need to ask a question...not sure if I'm at the right place

sstackiegal
April 14th, 2009, 12:52 PM
I have a 61/2 year old doberman female. If she has an ulcer, which is unknown to me or her vet, when that ulcer gets enflamed and starts leaking, could that make her insulin levels be misread? Could this ulcer make it seem as if she has diabetis?

sugarcatmom
April 14th, 2009, 02:14 PM
Where is the ulcer?

There are situations where stress or an infection can cause blood glucose levels to increase. One way to know if this is temporary or not is to have a fructosamine blood test done. This gives the average glucose levels over a longer period of time (like a couple weeks). Does your dog have any symptoms typical with diabetes, like increased drinking and urinating, excessive appetite, lethargy?

Bailey_
April 14th, 2009, 02:16 PM
Bump.Bump.

Maybe someone here knows anything regarding dog diabetes or ulcers?

The only thing I could reccomend to rule out ulcers spiking your dogs insulin would be to have your vet check her stomach cavity. Has she had diabetes for a while?

**Edit** sugarcatmom, beat me too it! :)

sstackiegal
April 15th, 2009, 11:46 AM
The ulcer was found hidden by the gall bladder. My main question is: can an ulcer (when bleeding or leaking) make it seem as if the dog has diabetis? She first got sick in Nov.2008 they said she had a urinary track infection, gave her antibotics. She didn't get much better, but a little bit. A few weeks later, she had the same symtoms and they gave her more antibotics....again she got a little bit better. The symtoms came back about 4 weeks ago, they then said she had diabetis...we started her on insulin 2x per day and changed her food to the diabetic dog food. She hurt her leg about 2 weeks ago they gave her a pain killer and something else to take for 7 days. On the 6th day she vomited one time. On the 7th day she vomited many times and I rushed her back to the vet. They then said she had pancreites and needed to be hospitalized to get stable. They called me later that night and said she was getting critical and needed exploratory surgery. When they did the surgery they found the ulcer which was hidden by the gall bladder. COULD it have been an ulcer problem this whole time? She died on the operating table

clm
April 15th, 2009, 12:20 PM
Oh my. I'm so sorry you lost your dog. I have no answers for you but you have my condolences.

Cindy

Diamondsmum
April 15th, 2009, 12:22 PM
Ohhhh I am soo sorry for your lose..:candle: :cry:

I wish I could answer that Q :sad:

Maybe Dr. Lee resident vet can answer it

sstackiegal
April 15th, 2009, 12:31 PM
How can I ask Dr. Lee? I'm new here and don't really know my way around.

Diamondsmum
April 15th, 2009, 01:02 PM
he visits the part of the forum and hopefully he has some insight for you.

As well I will PM his the link.

Bailey_
April 15th, 2009, 01:13 PM
SO incredibly sorry to hear about your loss. Hopefully someone here will be able to answer your questions!!!

Kahne9Lover
April 15th, 2009, 02:50 PM
I am so sorry for your loss. Hopefully Dr. Lee can help answer and give you some closure.

Dr Lee
April 16th, 2009, 02:45 AM
My main question is: can an ulcer (when bleeding or leaking) make it seem as if the dog has diabetis?... The symtoms came back about 4 weeks ago, they then said she had diabetis...we started her on insulin 2x per day and changed her food to the diabetic dog food.... They then said she had pancreites and needed to be hospitalized to get stable.... needed exploratory surgery. When they did the surgery they found the ulcer which was hidden by the gall bladder. COULD it have been an ulcer problem this whole time? She died on the operating table

Firstly, I am very sorry for your loss.

I would like to, I hope, give some peace in that a gastric (stomach) ulcer (which is what I am assuming was mean by ulcer) cannot alter a blood and urine test and 'simulate' diabetes. (Also no other form of ulcer can 'stimulate' diabetes either;)). Stomach ulcers can be difficult to diagnose.

Diabetes and pancreatitis can increase the risk of a stomach ulcer. In fact, pancreatitis can lead to diabetes as well. Thus if we had to pinpoint the initial culprit to this devastating and unfortunate situation, pancreatitis is likely to blame. Pancreatitis usually arises for reasons unknown although some causes and many theorized causes exist. Also the treatment of pancreatitis is difficult and in many cases the disease persists and/or progresses despite treatment. It is a horrible disease that affects many. Luckily for other dogs out there, many cases do not have such terrible effects.

I am sorry for your pet. It sounds like you and your vets did everything that they could including persistent workup, diagnostic testing and even exploratory surgery. Earlier diagnosis, if that was even possible in any way, of the ulcer would not likely have changed the course of events in the face of a severe, non-responsive pancreatitis. :pawprint: