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Need Help with Passive/Agressive Dog

sweetdee
March 26th, 2009, 12:38 AM
I have a big problem with my dog. Here is the situation. I adopted him in January. He was skinny to the point of having his ribs and spine showing, full of parasites and of course, not neutered. I was told he was a toy poodle but found out he is poodle/dachshund. He has become very aggressive to the point of growling and biting when he goes into his crate. he tries to attack me when I walk past it and if I try to make him do something when he doesn't want to he growls and tries to bite me. I can't trust him with children or seniors as well. He also has not bonded totally with me yet but will go to any man before he comes to me.

He does not know how to play with other dogs and sometimes he will wag his tail at them then attack them. We have not been shunned from the parks yet but it won't be very long before this happens.

I am at my wits end to know what to do. The vet says there is no medical problems. Does anyone have any suggestions for me? If I can't get this under control I'm not sure what my next step will be.
Thanks for any suggestions.

cuko
March 26th, 2009, 04:50 AM
Sounds like you have your hands full there!

When i put my babies or dogs in training in their crate.. mine normally howl but what i do it put them in a place they can carry on such as a room or laundry but also cover it. If they do something i dont like i splash them with water.... good ole water works a treat!

but your poochie sounds like it has a bit of a problem and I would suggest as alpha you would put the doggy on it's side and hold it down by the neck like any alpha dog would do. You WILL find your dog will scream and carry on as it i's being skinned alive but if you growl back at him and i mean growl and put enough pressure on him to show him you are serious.. he will get the message long enough. You might have to do this a number of times AND be prepared for testing times.. I had a friend who did that to their poodle only to find he ran into the house and pissed on his bed.. but with perseverance... it does work. It wont happen over night but it will happen.

How old is the dog? Also have you managed to find out a bit of background about the dog? That would also help i gather.

Good luck!

sugarcatmom
March 26th, 2009, 07:25 AM
I would suggest as alpha you would put the doggy on it's side and hold it down by the neck like any alpha dog would do.

I have to say I think this is totally the wrong thing to do. Alpha-rolling what may be a fearful dog is very likely to backfire. I think the OP needs to contact a trainer and get some professional help. In the meantime, some basic obedience training using positive methods is a good place to start to build some confidence in this pup. http://www.dogstardaily.com/

hazelrunpack
March 26th, 2009, 09:05 AM
I have to agree with sugarcatmom--alpha rolling often only escalates the problem. You really do need to have your dog evaluated by a behaviorist or trainer with aggression experience, sweetdee. Until you know exactly what's triggering the behavior you won't be able to fix the problem...and it's something that has to be observed in person. Trying to diagnose something like this without seeing the dog in action has it's own perils.

Aggression can be a tough problem to tackle, but with appropriate training, it can be controlled. Please let us know how it goes!

luckypenny
March 26th, 2009, 09:32 AM
I totally aggree with sugarcatmom and hazelrunpack.

Pinning your dog will only exacerbate the situation.....it'll teach him that you're aggressive and not to be trusted, not a leader.

Here's a site that may help you find an experienced trainer/behaviorist in your area. Just click on "finding a trainer" in the left hand column and enter your info there. http://www.cappdt.ca/public/jpage/1/p/Home/content.do



Good luck :fingerscr.

Blackdog22
March 26th, 2009, 10:07 AM
I have a big problem with my dog. Here is the situation. I adopted him in January.


You have only had him for about 3 or 4 months then?
Some dogs will take a decent amount of time to fully bond to the owner, if the dog has been traumatized or abused, you will also have that working against you (I have heard of some dogs taking over a year to regain trust in humans).

He was skinny to the point of having his ribs and spine showing, full of parasites and of course, not neutered.

Is he fully recovered from all of these parasites? This could be making the dog very uncomfortable if he is not fully recovered. I would also get him nuetered asap.

He has become very aggressive to the point of growling and biting when he goes into his crate. he tries to attack me when I walk past it and if I try to make him do something when he doesn't want to he growls and tries to bite me.

Before trying any methods I suggest I would speak to a behaviorist or positive reinforcement trainer, at this point in your young relashonship, you don't want to do anything that will damage trust.

However, here is something I would try for the crate aggression. It seems to me the crate is the comfort zone for him. If I were you I would make a crate schedule (he goes in for one hour at 4 o'clock, and one hour at 1...etc.). Do not let him have free access to the crate, he has to know (eventually) that the crate does not belong to him, it belongs to you and you allow him to use it. This will enforce you as leader, without denying him the security of his crate....it's just not on his terms anymore.

As far as biting and growling when you give commands, speak to an educated trainer or behaviourist as they will need to assess why the behaviour is happening (where it's coming from)


I can't trust him with children or seniors as well.

Good, you shouldn't! In the future this will be an option, I hardly think he is a hopeless case. Right on to you for being responsible, so many people would be in denial and put the dog and public at risk.


He does not know how to play with other dogs and sometimes he will wag his tail at them then attack them. .

Do some reading on canine body language, more often then not a wagging tail (coupled with other body signals and posture) indicate a pending attack. Once you have an understanding of body language you should be able to predict when he will act out, this will greatly benefit you in the future with dogs you may encounter as well.

I would suggest staying away from the dog park until you get some more control over the situation. You don't want to overload yourself and dog on too many issues at once, if you know he is going to start stuff, don't take him there. Prevention is key. NOT saying you should ignore this problem, just syaing you should work on your problems in the home before taking on other dogs.

Bailey_
March 26th, 2009, 11:07 AM
I would suggest staying away from the dog park until you get some more control over the situation. You don't want to overload yourself and dog on too many issues at once, if you know he is going to start stuff, don't take him there. Prevention is key. NOT saying you should ignore this problem, just syaing you should work on your problems in the home before taking on other dogs.

Blackdog brought out a very important point here, which I think is essential for the first few steps of your dogs rehabilitation. I still think it's important for your dog to have that 'opportunity' to see other dogs, but not at the park. Dog parks should be used as rewards, and too many people use this form of excercise as their dogs ONLY daily routine: and this is why that's dangerous.

Dog parks do not offer a dog any boundries or structures. You're essentially saying to your dog - go do your own thing, be your own boss, have fun. Which is fine - UNLESS your dog is not under control before you even reach the park. If your dog is unstable, not listening to you, before you even get there; there will be problems.
Keep taking your dog out daily, but give him excercise on-leash. This, coupled by contacting a local behavioralist will be able to help you figure out what direction you and your dog should be going.

sweetdee
March 26th, 2009, 01:31 PM
:cry:Unfortunately, I have made the decision to give him up. When I brought him in from his walk he ran to his crate. I got there before him and closed the door. He then attacked me and drew blood. It seems like one minute he is okay then he goes nuts with fangs bared and snarling and even drooling at times.

I just don't want anyone, including myself or my cat, to get hurt anymore.
This is not an easy decision for me to make but I need to think about Buddy, the dog, as well.

I appreciate all the advice given. When I got him I was told the owner was moving to Ontario and couldn't take him with her so left him with her daughter and her boyfriend. Somehow I don't really believe that as the vet says the aggression issues have been there for a long time not just recently, and so got rid of him due to his issues. Not sure how old he is

BenMax
March 26th, 2009, 01:48 PM
Poor little soul. Sometimes it takes time to help them feel safe when they are re-homed time and time again.

I hope that this dog is now with a rescue group or dedicated shelter that will not give up on him.

Training and consistancy is the key. Hopefully he will find a home where he can flourish.

BenMax
March 26th, 2009, 01:54 PM
Actually I want to add that a professional whether a behaviouralist or trainer should have been consulted. I think that this would have saved the day...or at least his day.

Bailey_
March 26th, 2009, 01:56 PM
Really sorry to hear about this, Sweetdee.

I don't want to be a downer, but I do have a few things to say regarding this situation.

When we bring an animal into our homes, we have the incredibly important responsibility to do the best we can for them. Constant rehoming of an animal is so damaging, sad, and in a lot of cases avoidable.

Sweetdee, I understand that in your situation you were frustrated and also concerned about the well-being of your cat and your home. I know how hard it is to feel like you've come to your wits end with an animal; but did you actually try to contact a proffessional? Someone who could come into your home and help you work through this aggression and get to the root of the problem?

I have NO doubt that this poodle was not a lost cause, nor did it sound like a very serious case of aggression. (From what you've told us, I would say it comes out of serious lack of socialization, and insecurity.) These are all things that can be worked on, you just need someone who knows what they're doing to tell you how - to meet your dog - and help both of you get through this.
You've had your dog for such a short period of time, (I know it probably doesn't seem short when you're dealing with behavioral issues) but 3-4 months is not long enough to create a bond and expect your dog to trust you fully.

Please don't take offence to this, but I think it's extremley sad that you've made this choice, without consulting someone who can help you.
This is why so many dogs are bouncing around - their behavioral issues only getting worse with each home they land themselves in. We can all, as responsible owners, do our part to keep this from happening. We just have to TRY.

WE CHOOSE THE DOGS. They do not choose us.

Bailey_
March 26th, 2009, 01:58 PM
Actually I want to add that a professional whether a behaviouralist or trainer should have been consulted. I think that this would have saved the day...or at least his day.

You beat me too it BenMax. Very, very true.

BenMax
March 26th, 2009, 02:01 PM
Thank you Baily for adding the following. I am convinced that this dog can be worked with based on what I read. I just hope that he is given to a rescue that will help with the re-habilation and then find him a family that has experience, time and patience to see him through it.

I can tell you that I always, always take the underdog that is deemed unadoptable based on temperment or behavioural issues and you would be surprised how well they do with me and their forever new homes. One must be committed and determined.

My major problem with this is that help was requested today, and given up upon today as well.

I feel so badly for this dog.:sad:

Bailey_
March 26th, 2009, 02:04 PM
Thank you Baily for adding the following. I am convinced that this dog can be worked with based on what I read. I just hope that he is given to a rescue that will help with the re-habilation and then find him a family that has experience, time and patience to see him through it.

I can tell you that I always, always take the underdog that is deemed unadoptable based on temperment or behavioural issues and you would be surprised how well they do with me and their forever new homes. One must be committed and determined.

I feel so badly for this dog.:sad:

Ditto.

I want to take him. :cry:

BenMax
March 26th, 2009, 02:05 PM
Ditto.

I want to take him. :cry:

Me too Bailey. There is hope and potential. When they are little breeds they are a little easier to manage. It is not a lost cause.

Damn!:sad:

Bailey_
March 26th, 2009, 02:16 PM
Me too Bailey. There is hope and potential. When they are little breeds they are a little easier to manage. It is not a lost cause.

Damn!:sad:

Very true. :sad: The poodle breed is so smart too; I just hope this dog finds a home that is aware of his problems and can help him right from the get-go.

Sweetdee, if this really is your final decision to find a new home for your dog - please ensure that you make the rescue that takes him AWARE of the things you've seen and gone through. It will help give them a step up on finding the best possible home for this little guy.

aslan
March 26th, 2009, 03:27 PM
Me too Bailey. There is hope and potential. When they are little breeds they are a little easier to manage. It is not a lost cause.

Damn!:sad:

Sorry Benmax but i do have to disagree on a couple things. Size has nothing to do with how easy a dog is to manage unless you are planning on physically handling the dog. A small dog can be just as nasty as a large dog, and from experience i can say they bite just as hard. And we can't say one way or the other if the dog is a lost cause. Not knowing anything of the dogs history, he very well could be inbred and a little off if you know what i mean. Not everyone can afford a behaviorist and not all dogs can be fixed. It's sad but its true.

BenMax
March 26th, 2009, 03:40 PM
Very true Aslan but it is easier to endure the off behaviour of a small dog then you would one like perhaps a rottie. I stand by saying that they are easier to work with based on their size.

Bailey_
March 26th, 2009, 03:57 PM
Sorry Benmax but i do have to disagree on a couple things. Size has nothing to do with how easy a dog is to manage unless you are planning on physically handling the dog. A small dog can be just as nasty as a large dog, and from experience i can say they bite just as hard. And we can't say one way or the other if the dog is a lost cause. Not knowing anything of the dogs history, he very well could be inbred and a little off if you know what i mean. Not everyone can afford a behaviorist and not all dogs can be fixed. It's sad but its true.

I have to disagree. The toy breeds can certainly give quite the bite, however they do not bite 'just as hard', for a number of reasons - one being most toy breeds don't have the ability to physically lock their jaw such as the larger bully breeds. They also don't have the same diameter of a bite, nor do they have the same jaw size. If we want to get particular here - a small dog does not physically have the capacity to exhibit the SAME kind of aggressive physical bite as a large breed dog, simply based on size difference.

With that said, it does not mean that a toy breed does not have the ability to be in the same state of aggressiveness as a large breed. Absolutley this is possible.

Many, many dogs that have been labelled for euthanasia based on aggressive behavior COULD have been rehabilitated. The problem is exactly what's happening to this little poodle in this thread - people giving up on him. Behavioral issues proggressivley get worse when a dog is constantly rehomed because they learn to never really trust a human - they aren't given the chance to bond - thrown from home to home, and eventually unable to find someone that wants to work with them. A dog that 'can't be fixed' is usually the result of the above, and when do we say as humans: This animal should not be given another chance? Or perhaps, a LONGER chance.

People that cannot afford a behavioralist, have not asked for help. Speaking as a behavioral trainer, I not only do pro-bono work - volunteer my time to many rescues around my area and to those that adopt from them - if you "can't afford a trainer" then you have not looked hard enough. Most people in this business are in it for the love of animals; and any trainers I know would absolutley help someone (to at least a certain degree) if they truly could not afford anything.

Which brings me to another point: If you do not have the money to afford proper training (if need be) then you should certainly not be adopting a dog you know nothing about.

Blackdog22
March 26th, 2009, 04:13 PM
RIGHT ON BAILEY

That was very well said. I agree wholeheartedly.

Aslan, I agree that sometimes a dog can just be a bit screwy, but the incidence of this is extremely rare. In most dogs the beahviour is always caused by something....not just a loose screw.

It is true that we cannot say for sure that the dog is not indeed, aggressive to the point of no return, but if one has experience with aggressive dogs it is fairly easy to see that this was not likely the case. (jmo)

There are many clubs and groups that specialize in aggression that will allow you to train free of charge. All you have to do is ask.

aslan
March 26th, 2009, 04:29 PM
oh not the urban legend again.. bullies DO NOT have the ability to lock their jaws anymore than any other breed they just have the second strongest jaw there is, it's not that it locks, they just don't want to let go. Might want to look it up here.

www.badrap.org/rescue/myths.cfm

Yes large dogs can bite larger areas, yes the bite from both hurts, yes both can do damage, etc, etc.

As for inbreeding being rare, tell that to several people who have gotten the gorgeous rotti/sheppard mix that turned out to be inbred in ontario. It's not as rare as you'd think.

Blackdog22
March 26th, 2009, 04:50 PM
Inbreeding is MUCH different then a having a dog that is genuinely pyschotic and aggressive. So many "inbred" dogs are fine healthy specimens of their breeds. The problem with inbreeding is the same problem with linebreeding(which in some breeds it is essentially the exact same thing) is that you are doubling(or quadripling) on both postive and negative characteristic of that line or dog. I'll agree that most people do NOT know what they are doing when it comes to breeding, nevermind linebreeding. Usually the dogs end up with very weak nerves, they are sharp (reactive) and unstable....hardly incurable and untrainable as they are in fact animals and all behaviour stems from instinct. To have a truly insane dog, is very rare, an incurable dog would not rely on his canine instincts and would therefore be unpredictable. I'm not saying inbreeding is right or wrong, I am just saying even with a very inbred dog, it is not likely to have incurable aggression.

That being said, a dog with a genetically poor tempermant is likely to have behaviour problems, the severity of those problems stems directly from 3 things, genetics, enviorment, training(all are equally important).

Bailey_
March 26th, 2009, 05:52 PM
oh not the urban legend again.. bullies DO NOT have the ability to lock their jaws anymore than any other breed they just have the second strongest jaw there is, it's not that it locks, they just don't want to let go. Might want to look it up here.

www.badrap.org/rescue/myths.cfm

Yes large dogs can bite larger areas, yes the bite from both hurts, yes both can do damage, etc, etc.

As for inbreeding being rare, tell that to several people who have gotten the gorgeous rotti/sheppard mix that turned out to be inbred in ontario. It's not as rare as you'd think.

Aslan: Thanks for bringing up the locking thing. I did mean 'lock' as in the dogs ability to hold a bite; and I was using the bully breed as an example as they are obviously an incredibly strong line. A bite from say, an american bulldog, would be completley different than our dog in question (poodlexbeagle) BECAUSE of the bulldogs ability to hold it's pressure during an attack. It's more common for a toy breed to bite and release, compared to that of the larger - stronger breeds - who bite and clamp.

As BlackDog pointed out, inbreeding is certainly NOT a cause for behavioral issues. In fact, you're more likely to have a dog with funny physical traits, than you are to have a dog with neuro problems due to inbreeding.

sweetdee
March 27th, 2009, 01:59 AM
I think I need to clarify something here. Over the last month he has progressively gotten worse, ending with me being attacked and bitten on the leg and foot today. He actually broke the skin on my leg through my jeans. All I did was walk past his crate, he was not in it but in front of it.
He is thought to be part poodle part dachshund.
I know a lot of you think that the problem has only just started but it has been ongoing for me since I got him. I am disabled and can't move very quickly and don't want to put myself in jeopardy any more.

BenMax
March 27th, 2009, 07:38 AM
Sweetdee, truly we understand. Sometimes it's just not the right 'fit'. Is there a rescue group around you that will assist you in taking this dog? This is probably the best scenario.

If you get another dog, go to a rescue that has dogs in foster homes. This way they can help you find a companion that fits your needs and requirements.

I always say that sometimes getting an animal you do not know could be a 'bad marriage'. Not to say that one should give up but if there are certain restrictions due to medical issues then this may indeed not be the right dog for you. If you tried and cannot cope then it's understandable.

It just goes to show all of us that sometimes we jump to conclusions without knowing the full picture. My apologies Sweetdee.

Please try relinguishing him to a rescue however. They will help him with his problems and re-home him hopefully.

Best to you.

aslan
March 27th, 2009, 08:44 AM
To quickly respond. My point is we can't give general responses to the OP or anyone else without seeing the situation first hand, knowing the OP etc,etc. Benmax you will say yourself, that LP's lucky was not the same dog you originally saw. All due to LP's experience,heart and patience. But what she did with him she may not be able to do with another dog. People are becoming too quick to jump on the people posting for help,information, etc. I have no doubt if i was a first or second time poster when i posted about my Bishop i would have been jumped all over aswell. Mind you i still got a couple dense remarks. Because i know members here i knew who to listen to such as Hazel,LP, and angeldogs(by the way i owe you a huge thanks for your help angeldogs). Each case is different from the next and we have to stop lumping them all into the same category. I'm sure a few new posters were thinking nasty things about me when i asked for help, but members here who have seen me with not only my pets, but some of theirs with issues know I know how to handle an animal. Can we try giving suggestions to people and refrain from voicing our opinions for abit.

BenMax
March 27th, 2009, 08:49 AM
Aslan I already said this. It's over. I don't think anyone was judging you and I am sorry you feel this way.

aslan
March 27th, 2009, 09:01 AM
Aslan I already said this. It's over. I don't think anyone was judging you and I am sorry you feel this way.

At no point did i say i felt judged so no need to apologize. I think from meeting me in person you know i don't let what people think about me concern me too much unless i consider them a friend. I was speaking for the new people coming here for help.

BenMax
March 27th, 2009, 09:04 AM
At no point did i say i felt judged so no need to apologize. I think from meeting me in person you know i don't let what people think about me concern me too much unless i consider them a friend. I was speaking for the new people coming here for help.

I hear what you are saying Aslan. I don't know what happened when you asked for help.

Infact I think that most know your committment to your pets. You asked for help and where mentored by those that you consider valuable people and friends. You tried everything that was handed to you and you worked it through. I know that you tried the suggestions and succeeded.

I think everyone wants to help the OP and not hurt.

aslan
March 27th, 2009, 09:10 AM
lol, hon this isn't about me or bishop.... We(me included) need to read the post. go read something else and then comeback and respond to these kinds of threads. We are developing a nasty habit of pointing fingers at alot of these threads. What i'm saying is take a minute, move emotion aside, then post.

BenMax
March 27th, 2009, 09:18 AM
lol, hon this isn't about me or bishop.... We(me included) need to read the post. go read something else and then comeback and respond to these kinds of threads. We are developing a nasty habit of pointing fingers at alot of these threads. What i'm saying is take a minute, move emotion aside, then post.

You are right Aslan. I apologized and hopefully re-deemed myself in a small way.:)

Blackdog22
March 27th, 2009, 09:37 AM
Perhaps I'm confused, I don't see anyone in this thread "pointing fingers"
Maybe someone can enlighten me?

BenMax
March 27th, 2009, 09:42 AM
Perhaps I'm confused, I don't see anyone in this thread "pointing fingers"
Maybe someone can enlighten me?

I think what is meant is that we were trying to encourage someone to do something that they were physical incapable of doing.

What Aslan is saying is that perhaps we should ask more questions before trying to fix something that has extenuating circumstances.

I myself judged before knowing the full story about the perdicument that the OP is in.

Blackdog22
March 27th, 2009, 09:57 AM
As far as I know, most who replied, did so to the best of their ability by going what the OP written. NOBODY knew the OP was disabled until AFTER the fact, we can only go by what is written.

I just want everyone to know this is a forum. We don't know anything about OP, that's not the perogative of this place(from what I know). Why would you judge yourself for not knowing the full story......do we EVER know the full story? I didn't know we had to be fully versed on the OP's situation to reply...

I certainly wasn't trying to "fix" anything, simply offering my advice on the circumstances presented.

Is this forum not in place to give advice and offer opinions?

BenMax
March 27th, 2009, 10:06 AM
BlackDog22 - it is a place to provide advice and to assist where we can.

Did you think that maybe Aslan was directing this at me? I have been in rescue for years and I sometimes jump onto people. I did so by saying what I said within this thread. I judged, wrote what I wrote and then after the OP saying her situation I personally feel a little badly.

It's over now. The only thing to do at this point is point the OP into a rescue direction and not make matters worse.

Blackdog22
March 27th, 2009, 10:26 AM
Regardless of who it was directed at, I feel it was unwarranted.
Your right, it's over now.

OP I wish you the best of luck for the future and I do hope you will come back when you find your perfect match :)
Perhaps even someone on the forum invloved with rescuing small dogs can assist you on your journey. I hope you wont let the mismatch with your current dog scare you away from dog ownership. When you find the right match, dog ownership is one of the most rewarding experiences. Nothing compares to the love of a dog!

Good luck.

aslan
March 27th, 2009, 10:40 AM
could you point out what exactly i said that was unwarranted. I was not just speaking about this thread but many others on the forum. I wasn't rude and if suggesting people take a second to think before posting is rude then i apologize for offending sensitive persons. But how do you think someone coming here and asking for help feels when jumped on. ( not talking about this thread).

Bailey_
March 27th, 2009, 02:09 PM
could you point out what exactly i said that was unwarranted. I was not just speaking about this thread but many others on the forum. I wasn't rude and if suggesting people take a second to think before posting is rude then i apologize for offending sensitive persons. But how do you think someone coming here and asking for help feels when jumped on. ( not talking about this thread).

Aslan, I think that's what we did do. We read what was given to us, and we thought about that, and we replied. I don't think anyone was jumped on at all - but I do think that this is the one downfall of the internet. Often what can be written in one tone, is read in a completley different one.

In this particular situation, we saw that the OP was asking for advice the exact SAME DAY that they also posted that they had decided to get rid of the dog; without first consulting a trainer or someone who could help them.

If my telling that person they should look a little harder to try and find someone in the area is 'jumping on them', then I hope that I can 'jump on' everyone else that tells me they're having problems with their dogs and are considering getting rid of it. I'll do MORE than just jump on that person, if it means helping the owner and the dog to live a happy life together.

As far as 'thinking' about any personal situations that are not mentioned by an OP to be more considerate with what I say in the future: we ALL have personal situations. When I hear about someones struggles with their pet, I immediatley take into account all the different varying types of personal home life that each individual may be withholding. But here's the thing: none of those personal issues are going to change my viewpoint or how I get it across, when I feel like an owner needs to pursue more help before rehomeing their pet. Period.

Am I sorry that the OP has a physical limitation that prevents them from feeling they can 100% fix their dog? Yes. Am I sorry for telling them to get the NEEDED help before making this incredibly serious decision? No.

I'm sorry if you felt like we were 'attacking' the OP, obviously that was not anyone's intention, and I understand where you were coming from. I just had to put in my two cents, I'm a big mouth, and I'll admit it. lol I do hope that Sweetdee can find a new suitable home for her dog in the meantime, and Aslan, I really do appreciate your comments on this.

*** Sweet Dee *** Please keep us posted as to what choice you'll make with your dog. I'm located in Alberta, and would be MORE than happy to help you with your current pooch - or refer you to someone who will.

sweetdee
March 27th, 2009, 08:18 PM
:thumbs up After some very hard soul searching, I am going to keep Buddy and work with a training group to see if we can work things out.
I understand the responses to my posts and must admit that I myself have taken that stance before as well. At first I was really upset but realize that my posts were not informative right away. I was at my wits end with Buddy and was ready to give up. BUT I am not a quitter and after reading the posts realized that I was acting with my emotions, not my head.
Thank you for all the suggestions and advice. I will definitely keep everyone updated on what's happening with us.

sweetdee

Bailey_
March 27th, 2009, 08:26 PM
So glad to hear it Sweetdee!!!!! :thumbs up Keep us posted, and if you need any further help, let me know.

totallyhip
March 27th, 2009, 09:08 PM
Oh I am glad to hear your keeping the dog. Can I suggest that you do NILF with him. And I agree do not alpha roll him. This is a submissive position that they should be giving up freely and not forced to do it.

I agree too that some training or consulting with a behaviourist would greatly help.

Blackdog22
March 27th, 2009, 09:18 PM
Fabulous news SweetDee!!
Keep us updated on the little fellow, I look forward to hearing all about your journey.
:)

angeldogs
March 28th, 2009, 05:11 PM
I just read this thread know and think it's great that you are going to work with him and get help.when you rescue an animal it can be impossible to know what they have been through to cause the aggression or other behaviour problems,unless you know where the animal came from where the abuse happened.dominate rolling can very dangerous to a human by leading to serious bites.

Please keep us updated.

aslan your welcome.