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Pros and cons of neutering cats

14+kitties
March 13th, 2009, 11:00 AM
I know there is a thread on this already. It deals mostly with dogs. I think it's only fair cats get one too.
For some reason breeding dogs seems to get more attention. Mainly I suppose because dogs are more "out there". However, the cat population is far outweighing the dog population. Take a look at shelters. There are so many cats waiting for adoption. We know it will never happen. :sad: They also get dumped in the country left to fend for themselves. We know how the majority of this ends up too.
I am doing this thread mainly because we have had a few people show up who don't feel it necessary to fix all their cats. It is so frustrating dealing with this. Especially knowing what so many of us on this site go through daily because of irresponsible people.
I am adding the other link for the other breeding link here..........
http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=59820
L4H, krdahmer, cpietra16 , lUvMyLaB<3, chico, clm, Coco350, everyone I forgot in my haste to do this and anyone else out there who deals with this daily, this one is for you............

And as always....... feel free to add to this.

http://cats.about.com/od/spayneuter/i/spaypregnantcat.htm

http://www.thepetcenter.com/sur/Spayandneuter.htm

http://www.petplace.com/cats/pros-and-cons-of-spaying-and-neutering-in-cats/page1.aspx

It's time to start thinking about spaying or neutering your cat. But, you are not quite sure if it is the right thing to do. If you're wondering whether you should just leave your cat as nature intended, consider the positive and negative aspects of spaying and neutering before making your decision.

First, what does neutering mean? Neutering is a procedure used to "de-sex" an animal. This procedure has been used to control animal population growth, reduce unwanted sexual behavior in pets, and decrease or eliminate the possibility of certain disease conditions later in life, such as pyometra or infection in the uterus.

Castration is a term used to describe the removal of the gonads (testicles) in male animals. Spaying is a term used to describe the sterilization procedure of females. The procedure of spaying most often consists of removal of both the ovaries and uterus, which is called an ovariohysterectomy.

Both procedures are performed under general anesthesia and both involve a surgical incision.

Neutering is done most commonly at or around six months of age. However, many veterinarians perform this procedure earlier – as early as 8 to 10 weeks in some situations. Early neutering can be done safely and has a number of advantages, especially in cases of pet adoption.

Spaying – The Positive Side


Spaying removes the risk of pregnancy.

Pet overpopulation is a serious problem and by allowing your cat to have litters, you are adding to the problem. Finding homes for your new family additions is not as easy as you may think. Even if you choose to keep the kittens, you will have the additional cost of vaccines, parasite control, toys and food for several pets. In addition to costs, the health of the mother can be in jeopardy during delivery. Some new mothers can have serious complications delivering kittens and can even develop health problems during nursing. All these potential problems can be avoided by spaying your cat.


Spaying makes for a calmer cat.

Without the drive to mate, your cat may be quieter and won't be prone to cat calls and the incessant need to seek out a mate. The spayed pet no longer attracts males and their annoying advances and serenades. Spayed cats are also easier to get along with. They tend to be more gentle and affectionate.


Spaying keeps your cat healthier.

A final positive aspect of spaying your cat is that spayed cats tend to have fewer health problems. Spaying is the removal of the ovaries and uterus. Without these organs, ovarian cysts, uterine infections and cancer of the reproductive tract are no longer a concern.

Spaying – The Negative Side


Spaying means sterilization.

Spaying will result in the sterilization of your cat, and she will no longer have the ability to become pregnant. In the era of pet overpopulation and the fact that thousands of unwanted pets are euthanized each year, this is really not so bad.


Spaying may cause weight gain.

Some cats may gain weight after spaying and as they get older. Unspayed animals typically have a strong mating desire and can expend a lot of energy seeking a mate and reproducing. Without this energy burden, your cat may eat the same amount but not burn off as many calories. Cutting back on food intake or increasing your pets activity will help reduce weight gain.

Neutering – The Positive Side


Neutering removes the risk of pregnancy.

Pet overpopulation is a serious issue and by allowing your cat to breed, you are adding to the problem. Although you may not own the female cat, and you are not burdened with finding homes for those new kittens, someone else is. Even if you accept your responsibility and choose to keep the kittens, you will have the additional cost of vaccines, parasite control, toys and food for several pets.


Neutering makes for a cleaner, calmer pet.

Another positive aspect of neutering your cat is that neutering can result in a calmer, and sometimes cleaner, home. Without the drive to mate, your cat may be quieter and not prone to cat calls and an incessant need to seek out a mate. The neutered cat no longer feels the need to seek out and serenade females. He no longer has the stress of needing to mark his territory and urinate throughout the house and yard. Neutered cats are also easier to get along with. They tend to more gentle and affectionate. Neutered males tend to roam less and typically are not involved in as many fights with other animals.


Neutering keeps your pet healthier.

A final positive aspect of neutering your cat is that neutered cats tend to have fewer health problems. Neutering is the removal of the testicles. Without these organs, testicular cancer is no longer a concern and the risk of prostate problems is reduced. For those people who would like to sterilize their cat but do not wish to alter his appearance, testicular implants are available.

Neutering – The Negative Side


Neutering is sterilization.

Neutering will result in the sterilization of your cat.


Neutering may cause weight gain.

Some cats gain weight after neutering. Intact animals typically have a strong mating desire and can expend a lot of energy seeking a mate and reproducing. Without this energy burden, your cat may eat the same amount but not burn off as many calories. Cutting back on his food or increasing his activity can help reduce the weight gain.


Last year about 17 million dogs and cats were turned over to animal shelters. Only one out of every 10 taken in to the shelters found a home. This means that over 13.5 million had to be destroyed. The tragedy is that this is unnecessary. Much of the problem could be eliminated by simple surgery: Spaying and neutering operations are performed under general anesthesia and are quite painless. By neutering pets, owners can help lower the numbers of unwanted and homeless creatures.

TacoGrl
March 13th, 2009, 01:59 PM
Excellent topic! :thumbs up

"For those people who would like to sterilize their cat but do not wish to alter his appearance, testicular implants are available."

Do people actually do this? I did not know that...seems like a waste of $$$, but then again so are a lot of things. :rolleyes:

As for the debate...

I have owned both fixed and non-fixed cats in my life and I have to say, I would NEVER have a non-fixed cat in my home again! The two I had when I was a kid, peed everywhere, howled and ran out of the house whenever possible. Since I was introduced to fixing, my cats have been quiet (not howling, but still the usual talking), clean (better litterbox habits as well) and content to live inside. Fixing is not even an issue anymore.

krdahmer
March 13th, 2009, 02:46 PM
:thumbs up No matter how many posts there are on this subject... there'll never be enough! Great post! :grouphug:

chico2
March 13th, 2009, 04:39 PM
I agree 150% and it's time people start looking at the cute little kitten they get,as part of the family,not a little play-thing who when it becomes a grown cat,gets forgotten and neglected.
Anyone taking ownership of a little kitten,has to think of the often up to 20yr lifespan of a cat.
The $$$ needed to take proper care,neuter/spay,meds etc..
A cat is a wonderful,trusting,loving animal,he/she depends totally on the owner.
Being dumped or left outdoors,he is lucky if he runs in to a caring person who will feed him,care for him,if not,he will more than likely die a slow and painful death,wondering why nobody loves him anymore.:cry:and there are many thousands out there:sad:

clm
March 13th, 2009, 05:55 PM
I actually consider it far more important to get a cat spayed or neutered than a dog. Indoor cats, females go into heat and do everything to try to get out if they're not spayed. No one is going to be happy in a house with a female in heat. A male indoor may start spraying. Anyone who has ever smelled cat urine would know that in it's own would be incentive enough to get a male neutered.
A female cat who is allowed to go outdoors and is not spayed is going to get hurt and going to get pregnant. No question about it. A male is going to spray your yard, your neighbours yard, yowel at night and get into more fights.

Dogs are easier to control, a female in heat can be kept inside or in a yard and away from male dogs. Not responsible to not get her spayed, but not impossible to prevent pregnancy. Likewise, unless you're foolish enough to let your male dog run at large, an unaltered male is unlikely to breed.

Cindy

14+kitties
March 13th, 2009, 09:14 PM
Well said Tacogrl, chico and clm! Taco - I had forgotten about the "implants" to make male pets look more natural. What a bunch of hooie!
Does anyone else have more info they can add that isn't already here? Maybe some personal stories? I know we all have them!

Love4himies
March 13th, 2009, 09:19 PM
I have thought about this thread and can't think of anything negative, only the positives that you have stated. I would never consider having a pet who was not altered. After having Sweet Pea in heat, I think they are much happier altered, than not.

ancientgirl
March 14th, 2009, 01:13 PM
Excellent post 14+. I'm so happy all of mine are fixed. Kiska went into heat a week before her scheduled spay, and that was one of the most stressful weeks of my life. I know it was harder on her though. I'm happy none of my girls will ever have to go through that. And even though I sometimes wonder how cute Vlad and Oksana's kittens may have been, I'm happy to not have to see it for myself. It would have killed me to have had Oksana go through giving birth, and being in pain and being so tired. Not to mention if she had not lived through it.

S/N is the best thing to do, all the way around.

14+kitties
March 14th, 2009, 05:03 PM
Thanks for your input gals! I just don't know how someone can watch more and more kittens being born only to meet a horrible ending without doing something about it. To me it is just :crazy:!