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Is my dog normal?

Rebecca53714
March 1st, 2009, 12:01 AM
Hello, my name is Becki and this is my 1st question/newbie. Ok here goes...
So I have a 2 yr old blue heeler mix that I got when he was 8 months old.(he was found stray as a puppy). He is my 1st dog so I don't really know if his behavior is normal or not. What he does is pretty much lie around in our bedroom in the evening while we are in the living room eating dinner,watching tv, and unwinding from our day. He will come out if you call him, tail wagging. After a few pets he retreats back to the bedroom. He does not chew things up,bark, jump up, dig,or create any other problems, he is just really quiet when we are at home. At the dog park he has a blast running and playing with other dogs. So...is what he's doing at home normal? Thanks for your help!

Scuba
March 1st, 2009, 12:51 AM
Like people, every dog is different. As long as there is nothing wrong with him medically I wouldn't worry about it. Some dogs just like to chill out and relax in a comfortable place. With your dog, it is the bedroom. He feels safe there and finds it relaxing probably.

I don't have my own dog, I just volunteer at the shelters. But I have noticed that some dogs just like to go and lay down in their beds in their kennels. Then on walks they act all goofy and want to check everything out. Whilst some dogs that are bouncy off the walls are really calm on walk.:shrug:

Each dog is an individual, they are not going to behave the same. Even if they are the same breed. Heck even dogs from the same litter can have very different personality.:D

Hopes this help.

Chaser
March 1st, 2009, 08:54 AM
A lot of days in the evening my one dog, Chase, will retreat to our room so he can have some quiet time. He loves us and loves his sister....but sometimes he just seems overstimulated and needs a break.

As long as he's been going for regular check-ups and is in good physical health I woudn't worry about this at all. If he was doing it all the time and never wanted to play or get attention I may worry, but this just sounds like he enjoys having his quiet time. :)

Sylvie
March 1st, 2009, 09:01 AM
If there is nothing wrong medically with your guy, then I think he could be bored. Do you play with him, are you fun to him??? It sounds like you have to make yourself more interesting, as he should have interaction with you.

Since he is having a blast with all the other dogs, he should be enjoying you also.

Sylvie
March 1st, 2009, 09:05 AM
Sorry,:o I did not welcome you to the site. You will find this a great place to be. There are so many good people willing to share their experiences with you and to give you advice when needed.

Enjoy

hazelrunpack
March 1st, 2009, 10:03 AM
Welcome to the board, Becki! (We'll need some pics of your beautiful boy, btw :D)

As for your questions, is this something that has come on suddenly? It sounds like a carbon-copy of what Cole does when he contracts Anaplasmosis...or what Belle does when she's having a Lyme's disease flare-up. These are both tick-borne diseases...and they're not the only two... Given that you're in Wisconsin, your dog is at risk. Even if you happen to live in Milwaukee or Madison, you can run into ticks. And if you're anywhere near the north and west part of the state, like us, you're in Tick Central. :frustrated:

So, if it were me, the first thing I'd do is ask your vet to run a 4DX snap test--it's a test put out by Idexx and it tests for 4 things: heartworm, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis and Lyme's. These last three are very common tick-borne diseases in the state and they can be killers if not treated.

Treatment is usually 2 - 6 weeks of doxycycline, sometimes followed up with 2 weeks of amoxicillin. We just finished treating all eight of our dogs for anaplasmosis using a 2 wk doxy/2 wk amoxi protocol, but we've also had good luck in the past with 4 -6 weeks of doxycyline alone. Make sure you treat for at least 4 weeks--vets with little tick experience will often treat for too short a time...

It's possible, of course, that your dog is just maturing and prefers to nap in the evenings. We have setters and at the age of about 3 they suddenly undergo what we call SSMS (Sudden Setter Maturity Syndrome) and become couch potatoes. :o Although this is perfectly normal for setters, we still always have them do blood tests and a 4DX when it happens, just to make sure it's just SSMS and not something more insidious.

I don't think your dog is just bored--bored dogs tend to chew up things and get destructive :D At least ours do! :laughing:

Rebecca53714
March 1st, 2009, 11:11 AM
Like people, every dog is different. As long as there is nothing wrong with him medically I wouldn't worry about it. Some dogs just like to chill out and relax in a comfortable place. With your dog, it is the bedroom. He feels safe there and finds it relaxing probably.

I don't have my own dog, I just volunteer at the shelters. But I have noticed that some dogs just like to go and lay down in their beds in their kennels. Then on walks they act all goofy and want to check everything out. Whilst some dogs that are bouncy off the walls are really calm on walk.:shrug:

Each dog is an individual, they are not going to behave the same. Even if they are the same breed. Heck even dogs from the same litter can have very different personality.:D

Hopes this help.

Thanks for the information. It makes me feel better already:dog:

Rebecca53714
March 1st, 2009, 11:14 AM
A lot of days in the evening my one dog, Chase, will retreat to our room so he can have some quiet time. He loves us and loves his sister....but sometimes he just seems overstimulated and needs a break.

As long as he's been going for regular check-ups and is in good physical health I woudn't worry about this at all. If he was doing it all the time and never wanted to play or get attention I may worry, but this just sounds like he enjoys having his quiet time. :)

He seems to not have any medical problems, and he still has his energy when we go for walks and to the dog park. It helps knowing that other people have dogs that do what mine is doing. Since he's my first dog, I have nothing to compare his behaviors to. Thanks so much!:pawprint:

Rebecca53714
March 1st, 2009, 11:16 AM
Sorry,:o I did not welcome you to the site. You will find this a great place to be. There are so many good people willing to share their experiences with you and to give you advice when needed.

Enjoy

Thanks so much for welcoming me to the site. I cannot tell you how thrilled I am that I can talk to other pet people and get their opinions and feedback with my dog. I may even have questions about my cat too sometimes!:pawprint:

Rebecca53714
March 1st, 2009, 11:25 AM
Welcome to the board, Becki! (We'll need some pics of your beautiful boy, btw :D)

As for your questions, is this something that has come on suddenly? It sounds like a carbon-copy of what Cole does when he contracts Anaplasmosis...or what Belle does when she's having a Lyme's disease flare-up. These are both tick-borne diseases...and they're not the only two... Given that you're in Wisconsin, your dog is at risk. Even if you happen to live in Milwaukee or Madison, you can run into ticks. And if you're anywhere near the north and west part of the state, like us, you're in Tick Central. :frustrated:

So, if it were me, the first thing I'd do is ask your vet to run a 4DX snap test--it's a test put out by Idexx and it tests for 4 things: heartworm, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis and Lyme's. These last three are very common tick-borne diseases in the state and they can be killers if not treated.

Treatment is usually 2 - 6 weeks of doxycycline, sometimes followed up with 2 weeks of amoxicillin. We just finished treating all eight of our dogs for anaplasmosis using a 2 wk doxy/2 wk amoxi protocol, but we've also had good luck in the past with 4 -6 weeks of doxycyline alone. Make sure you treat for at least 4 weeks--vets with little tick experience will often treat for too short a time...

It's possible, of course, that your dog is just maturing and prefers to nap in the evenings. We have setters and at the age of about 3 they suddenly undergo what we call SSMS (Sudden Setter Maturity Syndrome) and become couch potatoes. :o Although this is perfectly normal for setters, we still always have them do blood tests and a 4DX when it happens, just to make sure it's just SSMS and not something more insidious.

I don't think your dog is just bored--bored dogs tend to chew up things and get destructive :D At least ours do! :laughing:

Thanks for your welcome! I am so happy to be talking with you! I will have a picture of my doggie for you to see soon.
:thankyou::thankyou: Actually, my dog has always done this pretty much since I got him. In regard to the ticks, we do live in Madison, so we are in a high risk area. I will be taking him in to the vet in the next week for his heartworm test , so I will talk to the vet about checking him for tick-borne diseases. Thanks for all of your help and expertise, I love my dog soo much and I just want him to be happy.:dog::lovestruck:

hazelrunpack
March 1st, 2009, 11:35 AM
If he's always been like that then you may have just lucked out and gotten a very mellow soul as your companion :cloud9: I'd still have him checked just to be sure...

I don't think we've gone a year yet since moving out here 4 years ago without at least four dogs coming down with something or other tick-related... :rolleyes: But we're a ways up I94 and into the woods from you. :D

Corrie
March 1st, 2009, 11:44 AM
Becky...welcome to the board!

I must agree with all the other folks who say "normal for one is not necessarily normal for another” My little Westie, Charlotte is ALWAYS by my side…I have not gone to the bathroom by myself in 4 years!!! So if she suddenly was in another room by herself so hours on end that would not be “normal” for her and I would be concerned. Sounds like your little one needs some quiet time!

Miss Moe
March 1st, 2009, 12:39 PM
Hi newbie, I'm a newbie too. To the site that is, not dogs. I have a red heeler mix who is now 4 years old. Her bed is beside our bed and whenever she wants to be alone, that is where you will find her, which isn't very often. She would rather be with us at all times. She is either at my side or my husbands. Heelers need to work or think they're working. They usually pick one member of the family and that's who they work for. They need lots of one on one time with that person. I don't think yours is bored or it would be destructive. My Elli-Mae loved stuffing!! Until she was 2 no pillow or comforter was safe! I'd say the first 8 mos of his life has something to do with his demeanor or another breed is more dominant than the heeler. But then again you may have just lucked out and got a mello heeler, I've just never met one yet. Enjoy!
Ellie-Mae's mom

Gail P
March 1st, 2009, 08:16 PM
Welcome to the boards! I have a cattle dog mix too, that I adopted as a pup. He has always liked his quiet time and a "safe" corner to lie in, or under the bed. He loves to run and play outside but in the house he is usually pretty settled and doesn't like to be crowded by the other dogs. He sometimes lays in the living room but he has a spot in a corner behind the kitchen table that's out of the way that he likes, and as I said, under the bed is a favourite spot. It's just his personality. Sometimes when he's out of the way napping I forget where he is, if he's inside or out in the yard and I have to check. Here are a couple of pictures of Flash

http://www.racingrescues.com/images/photos06.jpg

http://www.racingrescues.com/images/a001.jpg

Miss Moe
March 3rd, 2009, 08:40 AM
He's beautiful!

BenMax
March 3rd, 2009, 09:03 AM
Very very handsome boy!!!:cloud9:

Gail P
March 3rd, 2009, 11:35 AM
Thanks :) Now we need to see pics of Becki's boy (hint,hint)

chico2
March 3rd, 2009, 04:37 PM
Wow Gail,he's a beauty:lovestruck:
Becky,welcome to our great Forum,you know we also like to see your kitty,right;)