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Coyote and TAS

NoahGrey
February 25th, 2009, 11:51 AM
I am surprised that this topic has not been brought up. I am sure everyone has heard of the coyote jumped a fence, attacked and carried off someone's dog.

Toronto Animal Services wants to hire someone to go, hunt it down and shoot it.

There is debate going on whether to humanely trap it and relocating it vs shooting it.

From what I have heard and read, most of the public are favoring towards humanly trapping it and having it relocated, rather then shooting it. And personally I feel that it should not be killed either.

And I just have to throw this out there. I can't believe that an animal welfare organization has this way of thinking. I could go on, but won't.

ACO22

Chris21711
February 25th, 2009, 11:59 AM
I am surprised that this topic has not been brought up. I am sure everyone has heard of the coyote jumped a fence, attacked and carried off someone's dog.

Most people in the Toronto area, a lot of people on the board are from other areas.

Toronto Animal Services wants to hire someone to go, hunt it down and shoot it.

They didn't actually say that from what I have read, but as you said below "there is a debate on".

There is debate going on whether to humanely trap it and relocating it vs shooting it.

From what I have heard and read, most of the public are favoring towards humanly trapping it and having it relocated, rather then shooting it. And personally I feel that it should not be killed either.

ACO22

The one downside to trapping and relocation, the majority of the times the animal will flounder. Coyotes in particular are very territorial and don't like interlopers.

NoahGrey
February 25th, 2009, 12:18 PM
The one downside to trapping and relocation, the majority of the times the animal will flounder. Coyotes in particular are very territorial and don't like interlopers.

I believe in this case, wildlife experts would be involved in the relocating. It would be relocated to a area where it would thrive.

I do agree with you that most animals die when relocated, but in these cases you have to look at the situation, knowledge of area, population, etc. There are alot of success stories of animals that have been relocated. I mean, being relocated at least it has a %50 chance of survivual..rather then just shoot him, whereas it gets no chance at all. All because it was doing what it is suppose too do.

Most animals are territorial and no matter where they are will encounter territorial issues. It is their way of life.

My issue is that this is a wild animal. This is not some dog that all of a sudden is agrressive and attacking other animals. This animal is doing what it is suppose to do...which is hunt. And because it unfortuanly attacked someones dog, people want it dead.

My heart goes out to the family, but I hope that this coyote is not shot.

ACO22

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 12:21 PM
Interesting topic ACO22.

Personally I would not like to see the coyote shot however I also look at the other side of the coin.

If a dog got out and killed another - would this dog be considered for re-location? I guess the arguement could be that the coyote killed out of survival. I am really not sure how I feel about it.

Unfortunately there is no easy answer. Shooting the animal - I say no. Humanly trapping and euthanizing humanely - I think so.

Chris21711
February 25th, 2009, 12:24 PM
I believe in this case, wildlife experts would be involved in the relocating. It would be relocated to a area where it would thrive.

There is no such place that exists ACO22. Wildlife just doesn't work like that unfortunately :sad:

ACO22

Were they able to trap the coyote, which is no easy task, other coyotes would move into the area and you would have the same situation all over again. There was a statement from one of the wildlife companies, a highly respected one and he said the exact same thing.

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 12:27 PM
Were they able to trap the coyote, which is no easy task, other coyotes would move into the area and you would have the same situation all over again. There was a statement from one of the wildlife companies, a highly respected one and he said the exact same thing.

Very true. They say that when an animal is removed, dies or is relocated, others will battle to acquire the 'new' territory. It can be a vicious circle either way.

I truly believe however that this animal must be removed as he/she is aware that there are 'easy' meals. I am concerned about the cat colonies which will also suffer such fates.

Chris21711
February 25th, 2009, 12:27 PM
Interesting topic ACO22.

Personally I would not like to see the coyote shot however I also look at the other side of the coin.

If a dog got out and killed another - would this dog be considered for re-location? I guess the arguement could be that the coyote killed out of survival. I am really not sure how I feel about it.

Unfortunately there is no easy answer. Shooting the animal - I say no. Humanly trapping and euthanizing humanely - I think so.

If they are intent on ridding the area of this particlar coyote, that would be the only humane option BenMax.

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 12:29 PM
Is there a wildlife animal sanctuary somewhere in Ontario? This could be an excellent option and solution.

Chris21711
February 25th, 2009, 12:31 PM
Very true. They say that when an animal is removed, dies or is relocated, others will battle to acquire the 'new' territory.

That is absolutely true

I truly believe however that this animal must be removed as he/she is aware that there are 'easy' meals. I am concerned about the cat colonies which will also suffer such fates.

If they dither long enough in coming to a decision, then Spring will have Sprung and all little critters will be out of hibernation.

NoahGrey
February 25th, 2009, 12:32 PM
Personally I would not like to see the coyote shot however I also look at the other side of the coin.

If a dog got out and killed another - would this dog be considered for re-location? I guess the arguement could be that the coyote killed out of survival. I am really not sure how I feel about it.

Unfortunately there is no easy answer. Shooting the animal - I say no. Humanly trapping and euthanizing humanely - I think so.

Can I ask why you think it deserves to be shot?

No, a coyote dog are two different animals. Yes, they share alot of physical traits/intelligance...one is wild, while the other is domestic.

ACO22

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 12:33 PM
If they dither long enough in coming to a decision, then Spring will have Sprung and all little critters will be out of hibernation.

You are right. Gosh - tough topic. I hope that something can be found as an alternative. I have to tell you though - if it were my dog that was scooped up, I don't know if I could answer this objectively.

Animal sanctuary would be great.

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 12:35 PM
Can I ask why you think it deserves to be shot?

No, a coyote dog are two different animals. Yes, they share alot of physical traits/intelligance...one is wild, while the other is domestic.

ACO22

Not shot ACO22. I don't think this at all. Euthanized humanly I am tettering on. I have to tell you I really am not easy with answering this with certainty. It is a tough question.

NoahGrey
February 25th, 2009, 12:36 PM
Animal sanctuary would be great.


I agree.

ACO22

Love4himies
February 25th, 2009, 12:37 PM
I don't think BenMax said shot, but to be humanely trapped and euthanised.

I am of the opinion that when you live where wildlife is, then you adjust your ways. That includes insuring your pets are safe. I have moved from the city to the country and have shifted my cat's freedom outside to address such incidents.

I think the coyote should live.

Chris21711
February 25th, 2009, 12:38 PM
Is there a wildlife animal sanctuary somewhere in Ontario? This could be an excellent option and solution.

There are, but they are few and far between, I don't think that they would take "nuisance" animals.

On the other hand if a coyote were hurt, they would examine the animal to see the extent of it's injuries, then decide whether that animal is fit enough to go back to the wild, if not they would try to find a sanctuary that would accept.

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 12:38 PM
I don't think BenMax said shot, but to be humanely trapped and euthanised.

I am of the opinion that when you live where wildlife is, then you adjust your ways. That includes insuring your pets are safe. I have moved from the city to the country and have shifted my cat's freedom outside to address such incidents.

I think the coyote should live.

Good point L4H. See - I am totally wishy washy on this one. You got me ACO22 - this is one subject that I really don't know where I stand.:shrug:

NoahGrey
February 25th, 2009, 12:40 PM
Sorry BenMax at first I thought you meant shooting it. I now know you don't want that. I agree. And if it came down to shooting it or humanely PTS. I vote Humanely PTS.

ACO22

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 12:40 PM
There are, but they are few and far between, I don't think that they would take "nuisance" animals.

On the other hand if a coyote were hurt, they would examine the animal to see the extent of it's injuries, then decide whether that animal is fit enough to go back to the wild, if not they would try to find a sanctuary that would accept.

Since there is so much controversy maybe it's worth a try. It would get them in the paper and sometimes they need this publicity to help with fundraising.

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 12:42 PM
Sorry BenMax at first I thought you meant shooting it. I now know you don't want that. I agree. And if it came down to shooting it or humanely PTS. I vote Humanely PTS.

ACO22

Don't think anything of it. It's ok no apology needed.:thumbs up

Chris21711
February 25th, 2009, 12:42 PM
If it were my dog, it would be difficult to make a non-biased decision, I would be heartbroken.

On the other hand, they are wild animals doing what they are suppose to do to survive, they know no different, it is what they are taught as pups.

Thinking about I'm with L4H........he lives.

NoahGrey
February 25th, 2009, 12:44 PM
I am of the opinion that when you live where wildlife is, then you adjust your ways. That includes insuring your pets are safe. I think the coyote should live.

Thank you and I agree. I am soo tired of hearing people bitch and moan about the wildlife in their area/backyards.

Expecially when they back onto a forest or a ravine. It's like you choose to make your home there. Yeah, your little house...just took aches of forest and ravine away from the wildlife, now having to sturggle finding shelter, food,etc. just annoys me.

ACO22

Love4himies
February 25th, 2009, 12:45 PM
If it were my dog, it would be difficult to make a non-biased decision, I would be heartbroken.



I think my decision would be different had it been my dog too. I do know that I would still have some compassion for the coyote as killing the coyote would not bring my dog back.

Chris21711
February 25th, 2009, 12:55 PM
I think they should leave him/her be, BUT it is YuppyLand in that area, so that probably will not be the case.

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 02:27 PM
I think they should leave him/her be, BUT it is YuppyLand in that area, so that probably will not be the case.

Hopefully someone in YuppyLand will stand up and make sense out of all this.

Love4himies
February 25th, 2009, 02:31 PM
Hopefully someone in YuppyLand will stand up and make sense out of all this.

We could only hope so, but they are so me me me me me me me, that they think the world should revolve around them and their family.

babymomma
February 25th, 2009, 02:43 PM
Expecially when they back onto a forest or a ravine. It's like you choose to make your home there. Yeah, your little house...just took aches of forest and ravine away from the wildlife, now having to sturggle finding shelter, food,etc. just annoys me.

ACO22



Well, I moved in the woods about 13 years ago. We have 5 acres of land. My dad chose to take about 1 acre and use it as a yard and whatnot, but the other 4 acres is left alone as forest and he animals are free to stay there. I complain about the coyotees all the time. We chose to move here, 13 years ago, But coyotess chose to come to my province just a few years back. I didnt choose to live in a coyote populated area. Coyotes are causing Species that are native to NFLD to die off. The almost extinct pine martin is being killed off. They are coming into rural areas and killing pets.

I dont like them, i mean i like them, I dont think they deserve to be shot, But something has to be done about them. I do not feel comfortable Going outside like I used to. Coyotees have ytaken over nfld. You can see the poor things dead in the ditch because they come out into the road. I too Am not sure where i stand.

But I have to ask you something. What about the coyotees that kill children in there own yards? Do you think they still deserve to live? They are doing something they were taught to do. :shrug:

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 02:59 PM
Well, I moved in the woods about 13 years ago. We have 5 acres of land. My dad chose to take about 1 acre and use it as a yard and whatnot, but the other 4 acres is left alone as forest and he animals are free to stay there. I complain about the coyotees all the time. We chose to move here, 13 years ago, But coyotess chose to come to my province just a few years back. I didnt choose to live in a coyote populated area. Coyotes are causing Species that are native to NFLD to die off. The almost extinct pine martin is being killed off. They are coming into rural areas and killing pets.

I dont like them, i mean i like them, I dont think they deserve to be shot, But something has to be done about them. I do not feel comfortable Going outside like I used to. Coyotees have ytaken over nfld. You can see the poor things dead in the ditch because they come out into the road. I too Am not sure where i stand.

But I have to ask you something. What about the coyotees that kill children in there own yards? Do you think they still deserve to live? They are doing something they were taught to do. :shrug:

Studies show that the coyote does not prey on humans - they are not 'taught' to do that. Also, since man has decided to move into areas that are more rural it is only normal that they also move due to the lack of space.

Man is greedy and have caused this imbalance - so the question is why are they the ones to pay the price for what WE have done.

The choice to move in wooded areas is ours - and we must deal with the animals that co-habitate with us. There are measures one can take to prevent them from causing imbalance in our lives - move and give them back their way of life.

Coyotes have taken over Nfld?

14+kitties
February 25th, 2009, 03:25 PM
I don't know. I tend to err on the coyotes' side. When people know they are in an area abutting an area where there is wildlife then people should take the initiative to not let a pet outside without supervision. We have a small fenced in area for Keesha. I also take her out on her leash if we go out the other door. Sam goes out by herself but she is bigger than most coyotes. I am pretty sure she would scare them off. We had a coyote in our side yard last month. Hubby went outside and it took off. I know the one that is being talked about is a little "tamer". Who made it that way?

As for relocating........ it would have to be moved to a spot where there were no other coyotes. They are pack animals. They do not accept "interlopers" easily if I am not mistaken. If that is not possible then the most humane way to do it would be to trap and euthanize. I have not heard of any children being attacked in their yards by a coyote. Most of them are terrified of humans. :shrug:

Chris21711
February 25th, 2009, 04:08 PM
But coyotess chose to come to my province just a few years back.

Coyotes didn't choose to come to Nfld. babymomma, you live on a Island. They were brought there by MAN.

But I have to ask you something. What about the coyotees that kill children in there own yards? Do you think they still deserve to live? They are doing something they were taught to do. :shrug:

Personally I have never heard of an attack on humans by coyotes, the ODD wolf attack but not coyote.

chico2
February 25th, 2009, 05:46 PM
We humans are very quick at yelling "kill"or calling wild animals pests as soon as they become an inconvenience,what gives us the right:confused:

Granted,this poor dogs demise was more than an inconvenience,however had this tiny dog been watched properly this would not have happened.
The owner said he was right there,but I somehow doubt that.

The wooded ravine area this happened,has probably been Coyote territory long before humans moved in,wild animals IMO,only adds to the beauty of living rural or in this case,in a wooded ravine.
I would say,leave him be,soon the area will be crawling with prey and with no Coyotes around,people will be complaining about rabbits eating their gardens:evil:
I have even seen Coyotes here in a very built up old area,I was thrilled when I saw one,the same way as when I saw a little Fox.
People have to learn to respect wild-life and look after their pets.
Maybe some people will keep their cats inside and that can only be good.

BenMax
February 25th, 2009, 05:49 PM
We humans are very quick at yelling "kill"or calling wild animals pests as soon as they become an inconvenience,what gives us the right:confused:

Granted,this poor dogs demise was more than an inconvenience,however had this tiny dog been watched properly this would not have happened.
The owner said he was right there,but I somehow doubt that.

The wooded ravine area this happened,has probably been Coyote territory long before humans moved in,wild animals IMO,only adds to the beauty of living rural or in this case,in a wooded ravine.
I would say,leave him be,soon the area will be crawling with prey and with no Coyotes around,people will be complaining about rabbits eating their gardens:evil:
I have even seen Coyotes here in a very built up old area,I was thrilled when I saw one,the same way as when I saw a little Fox.
People have to learn to respect wild-life and look after their pets.
Maybe some people will keep their cats inside and that can only be good.

Chico2 - so well said and you are so right. Seeing what you wrote I am no longer 'on the fence'. Excellent post!:thumbs up

Winston
February 25th, 2009, 06:03 PM
Wow this has been an interesting read.

THank you ACO22 for always bringing some interesting subjects to us! I think it is great to keep people thinking and reminding us all of different aspects! I havent read the whole story or viewed the news yet but I just wanted to say that I am fascinated when I see a coyote or a fox because you dont see them all that often but I always think how much we have encrouched (sp) on their territorys and places to live? its truly sad that we have forced them to places they are not used to! Its like the bears that come into the city because they are starving...yet we drove them to starvation in many ways? tough subject but one that must be discussed.

Cindy

babymomma
February 25th, 2009, 06:18 PM
Personally I have never heard of an attack on humans by coyotes, the ODD wolf attack but not coyote.

Funny, I was lead to beleive They came across on the ice. :shrug:

aslan
February 25th, 2009, 07:05 PM
Hate to tell you Chris but babymomma is right about how the coyote's got to newfoundland


The predators, which aren't native to the island, are believed to have crossed over from the mainland on pack ice 20 years ago.

mona_b
February 25th, 2009, 07:18 PM
Well the coyote's are here in Hamilton..A couple have been spotted here. I had a friend of mine tell me that there was one in Stoney Creek..I'm thinking it has alot to do with the Red Hill Creek. As I have seen more foxes and Deer around.

There was actually a Poodle type dog that was attacked by a coyote about a month ago.

I would like it if they could catch and relocate these beauties.:)

luckypenny
February 25th, 2009, 07:51 PM
How is a coyote humanely trapped and humanely euthanized :confused: :shrug:? Can't see them going along for the ride without experiencing great trauma :sad:. If it's decided that it be killed, somehow I think a quick accurate shot is the most humane way to go about it. Poor Coyote :sad:.

Another question for thought, there are dogs that aren't socialized who don't recognize babies and toddlers as humans, why would a coyote fear a young child? Especially if hungry and looking for prey?

mona_b
February 25th, 2009, 08:15 PM
Another question for thought, there are dogs that aren't socialized who don't recognize babies and toddlers as humans, why would a coyote fear a young child? Especially if hungry and looking for prey?

See the thing is,they won't fear a young child...Here there is a warning for pets and young children..It was said that they will go after them.

hazelrunpack
February 25th, 2009, 08:55 PM
How is a coyote humanely trapped and humanely euthanized :confused: :shrug:? Can't see them going along for the ride without experiencing great trauma :sad:. If it's decided that it be killed, somehow I think a quick accurate shot is the most humane way to go about it. Poor Coyote :sad:.

My thoughts exactly. The animal will be so traumatized by the trapping that there will be no chance of euthanizing it humanely...unless they gas it, and I'm not sure that falls in the 'humane' category. :shrug:

Another question for thought, there are dogs that aren't socialized who don't recognize babies and toddlers as humans, why would a coyote fear a young child? Especially if hungry and looking for prey?

Coyotes do not fear young children. An acquaintance of mine shot a coyote skulking up his drive after his 3-yr-old child as she played in the yard.

They are beautiful and interesting, but far from endangered. In fact, coyotes seem to be expanding their range. They are really very adaptable and clever. You really have to admire an animal that can do so well right under humanity's nose. Unfortunately, that adaptability sometimes creates conflict, as in the case of the dog and our neighbor's child.

happycats
February 25th, 2009, 09:45 PM
I say let him live......and as L4H posted when we move into "their territory" we need to adjust our ways and secure our property to ensure they don't eat our pets.

I find them to be amazingly adaptable, to be able to live and even thrive alongside and next door to humans is no easy feat.

We also have coyotes, and they actually come right up to our back fence (we back on to an overgrown greenbelt) I have no worries of them eating my pets, because my cats don't go out and we have ensured the fence is high enough and secure enough to keep them out, why can't these people do the same :shrug:

clm
February 25th, 2009, 09:55 PM
I'm siding with the coyote on this one. Living near a ravine has it's advantages and disadvantages. They can remove this coyote, but there will be more. Coyotes turf. Tiny dog out in a backyard alone with a fence not high enough to stop most large dogs from jumping it let alone a coyote. A hawk would find the same dog in the same yard just as easy prey. I doubt they would be out trying to shoot the hawk.
I've lived here for over 25 years with coyotes on the other side of our 8 foot tall fence behind the yard. Our dogs are not left outside alone. I'm sure the coyotes have got other peoples dogs around here and other peoples cats. Not everyone keeps their back fences in good repair making it easy for them to come into the neighbourhood if they choose. These are the same coyotes that are part of the airport pack that they tried to have a hunt to remove years ago and they didn't get one of them.
Coyotes keep a natural balance as any large predator does. They control rats, squirrels, mice and even help control the deer populations.
Leave them be and start acting like responsible people living with wildlife instead of trying to kill it.

Cindy

BenMax
February 26th, 2009, 09:24 AM
[QUOTE=luckypenny;751326]How is a coyote humanely trapped and humanely euthanized :confused: :shrug:? QUOTE]

LP have you ever seen how they euthanize wildlife? The animal is trapped, through the cage an injection is administered to sedate and then euthonal is administered.

As for shooting....well I went on a hunting expedition once to see for myself what happens. It truly is very sad and it is rare that an animal drops dead immediately from one shot. I can't tell you how horrible it is to see an animal struggle to get up from a bad aim.

I agree with most here. I think he should live.

Chris21711
February 26th, 2009, 09:46 AM
Funny, I was lead to beleive They came across on the ice. :shrug:

Hate to tell you Chris but babymomma is right about how the coyote's got to newfoundland


I stand corrected, I was unaware :o

Oh Aslan, please don't hate to tell me when I am wrong about something, if I am wrong, I'm wrong.

hazelrunpack
February 26th, 2009, 09:47 AM
I have seen how they euthanize wild animals. The animal always spends a number of hours stressing in the trap, and often gets ballistic at the approach of humans.

I have also seen animals shot. If you do it right, the animal drops. :shrug:

Either way there is a death involved and in neither case is it necessarily humane. :sad:

My biggest concern, regardless of how it's down, is that there is never 100% certainty (unless caught in the act) that the right animal is destroyed. And often, as in this case, how likely is the coyote to do the same again, anyway? Coyotes are opportunists and take a chance when they see it. Is it likely the same opportunity will offer itself again?

If the opportunity to take a pet comes up frequently, then it behooves the humans to take steps to prevent it, whether it be by securing the fence, making it higher, or whatever--and first and foremost, better supervision of pets when they're outside. Because even if a 'problem' coyote is destroyed, there are enough other coyotes out there capable of coming in and taking advantage of those same opportunities for a quick meal.

BenMax
February 26th, 2009, 10:47 AM
You are right on many counts Hazel, but if we choose to live in areas that were previously the main domaine of wildlife then it is not the animals that are having difficulty co-habitating - it is us.

We have caused this imbalance and yet our solution is to exterminate rather than find solutions. Animals will adjust and we will not.

As for the shooting of an animal - sorry I have seen enough of that. Unless someone is an excellent marksmen then I just do not think that this is a 'good' option.

hazelrunpack
February 26th, 2009, 12:03 PM
Actually, I'm agreeing with you. I don't condone shooting this coyote, merely commenting on what method, imo, would be more humane if it were done :shrug: Nowhere did I say it should be done.

Now, if the animal were out at an unusual (for a coyote) time of day and displaying abnormal behavior, it would be a different story. Around here, coyotes and racoons have been known to contract rabies and the authorities monitor the populations as closely as possible.

And I did offer some solutions--better supervision, better fencing, etc. It is up to the humans to make the solution work when problems occur.

However, one thing that continues to pop up is the idea that humans are necessarily moving in on traditional coyote territory. This isn't strictly true. Coyote ranges have been expanding into new areas, including into cities, in recent years, and this also creates problems.

Regardless, the solutions are the same.

BenMax
February 26th, 2009, 12:08 PM
Actually, I'm agreeing with you. I don't condone shooting this coyote, merely commenting on what method, imo, would be more humane if it were done :shrug: Nowhere did I say it should be done.



No where did I say any different about the word 'should'. So we agree about the problem but the method is still up in the air.

I have a feeling that the fate is sealed for this survivor for this reason we have gone a little off topis as to how this will unfold in regards to the method they will use.

Love4himies
February 26th, 2009, 12:22 PM
Coyotes have expanded north and eastward. They are exploding in population and the only way to control their population is to eliminate their food or to have natural predators, that is mother nature. To eliminate one or two coyotes and to leave their food source, will only allow for a new pack to move in.

There is no good way to kill a wild animal in my mind :sad:.

Sooooooo, to me that leaves education and safe practises to ensure pets and children are safe. If you have pets, they usually know before we do that there are coyotes in the area, learn to read their signs that there is something outside that is not right.

And yes they will attack children, they have even attacked teens, but on the whole, they are afraid of humans.

NoahGrey
February 27th, 2009, 12:51 PM
if we choose to live in areas that were previously the main domaine of wildlife then it is not the animals that are having difficulty co-habitating - it is us.We have caused this imbalance and yet our solution is to exterminate rather than find solutions. Animals will adjust and we will not.


So well said Bexmax...so well said.

ACO22

chico2
February 27th, 2009, 04:47 PM
In the Toronto Star this morning,there was a pic of this beautiful animal,apparently they are looking for his/her den,I don't even want to think of what's going to happen once they find it:sad:
To me it's just so darn sad..

NoahGrey
February 27th, 2009, 05:37 PM
In the Toronto Star this morning,there was a pic of this beautiful animal,apparently they are looking for his/her den,I don't even want to think of what's going to happen once they find it:sad:
To me it's just so darn sad..

Yeah...very true. And think TAS is suppose to be a Animal Welfare Organization.

ACO22

BenMax
February 27th, 2009, 05:38 PM
In the Toronto Star this morning,there was a pic of this beautiful animal,apparently they are looking for his/her den,I don't even want to think of what's going to happen once they find it:sad:
To me it's just so darn sad..

It is sad Chico2 - my thoughts are with this poor animal. What is this world coming to. We are at war with our fellow man and now animals. Pathetic.:sad:

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
February 28th, 2009, 12:54 AM
When will people (as a whole) learn to coexist with wildlife? If it's not seals or cormorants, geese, snakes, alligators (people are actually surprised when they become a "problem" when they build ther expensive homes into their territory), deer, bears, wolves, cougars, it's my favorite wild animal, coyotes. :(

Removing the coyote will definately bring more in, just as it's been shown that killing feral cats is not the answer. Some very informative coyote sites:

http://www.easterncoyoteresearch.org
http://www.coyoterescue.org
http://coyoteinfo.typepad.com/my_weblog/ (contains some very sad, graphic images of coyote abuse that would not be tolerated if it was something "cute" like a Golden Retriever or a kitten)

Seems Hamilton's animal control is much more educated on coyotes.:thumbs up I sent them an email with the links to these websites and they emailed me back with an pamphlet that they will be giving to Hamiltonians on how to coexist with coyotes. Here's hoping Toronto will do the same.

chico2
February 28th, 2009, 08:33 AM
MOTD,I remember the frenzied shoot-out of the Cormorants:sad:the killing of hundreds of Raccoons and Foxes by the Ministry of Natural Resources:evil:
I won't even think of the annual Seal-hunt:sad:
Hamilton seems to me to be more animal-friendly,I have dealt with Hamilton HS at one time and they were great,dealt very quickly with an Bunny-abuse case.
When we moved to Oakville many years ago,we were 2 minutes away from farm-land,cows grazing,now it's all built up with rows and rows of ugly houses and it's still going on...no room for wildlife:sad:
:pray:the Coyotes will be safe:pray:

Chris21711
February 28th, 2009, 06:48 PM
A short video of the coyote walking the neightbourhood, taken by a Toronto Star reporter:

http://www.thestar.com/fpLarge/video/593440

krdahmer
February 28th, 2009, 07:53 PM
if we choose to live in areas that were previously the main domaine of wildlife then it is not the animals that are having difficulty co-habitating - it is us.

We have caused this imbalance and yet our solution is to exterminate rather than find solutions. Animals will adjust and we will not.



:highfive: I can't tell you the number of times I've used that as an arguement when people start complaining about having to deal with wildlife, (my dad's always complaining about geese on the golf course... people whining about wild animals eating their garbage...etc etc). The farther we keep extending ourselves (and I can't tell you how much all those gaudy cookie cutter subdivisions with no green areas irk me).... the less space that is left for all the creatures that lived there for centuries before us. We push them out of their homes and territories and then get angry when they find ways to adapt. Somedays I think we need a reminder that we are not the top of the food chain simply because we say we are, nor do we have the right to decide the fates of every other living being! :frustrated:

and 'we' is not referring to us in particular but humans in general... ;)

chico2
March 1st, 2009, 08:15 AM
Dahmer,my sentiment exactly!!
Chris thank's,he is a beautiful animal for sure.
The lady talking(did not have my sound on) now at least gets off her butt going outside with her little pooch:thumbs up
Honestly,I would feel a little antsy too,would watch him from a safe distance,but at the same time be in awe over this wild creature,it would never enter my mind to have him killed.
I would of course keep my cats safe,but we always do.
When people buy these homes,maybe they should be warned about the wildlife that comes with the natural beauty they chose to live in.
What's next on the agenda???Raccoons,Deer,Skunks,Groundhogs,Possums,H awks,oh and of course the dreaded Geese,who poop and the destructive Squirrels:evil:

babymomma
March 1st, 2009, 01:46 PM
k, So i decided to check out a book from the library about coyotes.

Shooting them will not do ANY good and may make the situation worse.

When the coyote population decreases in a certain "turf", females will start having more puppies to bring it back up.

When it increases to high, females will cull puppies so that the population isnt too high as the food sources decrease.
or just not have pups. Apparently they are more in control then dogs:shrug:

ruby2sday
March 1st, 2009, 01:57 PM
If everyone who owned pets kept them in a secure fenced backyard the coyotes wouldn't be able to get at them. I'm talking about a 6 foot fence with no space below it. Lock your gates as well as people have been known to steal them right from the backyard too.

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 3rd, 2009, 01:05 AM
MOTD,I remember the frenzied shoot-out of the Cormorants:sad:the killing of hundreds of Raccoons and Foxes by the Ministry of Natural Resources:evil:
I won't even think of the annual Seal-hunt:sad:
Hamilton seems to me to be more animal-friendly,I have dealt with Hamilton HS at one time and they were great,dealt very quickly with an Bunny-abuse case.
When we moved to Oakville many years ago,we were 2 minutes away from farm-land,cows grazing,now it's all built up with rows and rows of ugly houses and it's still going on...no room for wildlife:sad:
:pray:the Coyotes will be safe:pray:

My thoughts exactly! Lets not forgot when they wanted to trap the beavers in Bayfront Park :rolleyes: Gee, a beaver in a lake? How shocking! MNR harasses legitimate wildlife rehabbers yet completely ignores roadsidze zoos. Ugh.

It boggles my mind that Toronto overreacts to coyotes and pit bulls but not to real human predators.

happycats
March 3rd, 2009, 07:10 AM
k, So i decided to check out a book from the library about coyotes.

Shooting them will not do ANY good and may make the situation worse.

When the coyote population decreases in a certain "turf", females will start having more puppies to bring it back up.

When it increases to high, females will cull puppies so that the population isnt too high as the food sources decrease.
or just not have pups. Apparently they are more in control then dogs:shrug:


Wolves are the same, only the Alpha male and female breed, but if "we" (meaning dumb humans) try and control their populations by killing them, then all the wolves in the pack will breed to compensate for it.

chico2
March 3rd, 2009, 08:55 AM
I honestly have nothing good to say about the MNR or the way they"manage"wild-life,it seems killing is their only solution:evil:
At the time when no baby-raccoons were allowed to live,Igette,a member here,found 5 baby--raccoons on her property.
She tried in vain to find anyone to care for them,but no sanctuary would,they'd been ordered to kill any babies by MNR.
She was only able to save one,the others did not survive....here he is all grown,he was free to go if he wanted and eventually he left.

BenMax
March 3rd, 2009, 09:23 AM
Chico2 - this is very sad. I do not understand why people don't get it. I think it boils down to us having the ability to be 'selfish'. Humans can never think beyond their needs - everything else is expendable.:sad:

chico2
March 3rd, 2009, 11:06 AM
Yes,it really is,at the time everyone on the Forum was trying to find some place that would keep the babies alive,but no,they had to be killed.
I forgot how many they had killed,but it was several hundreds....found to be 99,9 % very healthy animals.

BenMax
March 3rd, 2009, 11:13 AM
Yes,it really is,at the time everyone on the Forum was trying to find some place that would keep the babies alive,but no,they had to be killed.
I forgot how many they had killed,but it was several hundreds....found to be 99,9 % very healthy animals.

Seriously Chico2 - this really breaks my heart. I am not just saying this, I mean it. There was an idiot here that had killed 125 squirrels and asked for advice on how to rid them because more kept coming. He was explained that number 1 - it is illegal, and # 2 - it only will add to his 'problem'.

I wish that we could all just find peace. Where is it?:sad:

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 5th, 2009, 02:54 AM
Stupid MNR! :mad:RIP little guy/girl

March 04, 2009
The Hamilton Spectator
(Mar 4, 2009)
Coyote caught and killed

The city's animal control department has killed one of the coyotes roaming the Beach Strip.

The coyote was caught Monday night around 11:30 p.m., said city spokesperson Debbie Spence. It was taken to the city's animal shelter and euthanized yesterday.

The animal control department hoped to relocate the animal to the Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary in the Muskoka area but required permission to do so from the Ministry of Natural Resources.

Yesterday, the city learned the ministry would approve the move only if the animal was injured. The ministry then advised that the animal should be destroyed.

Spence said the city was trying to balance the rights of the animal with the safety of the community.

"Any animal that willingly goes into a trap is definitely habituated to humans and could be considered a threat to public safety," she said.
http://thehamiltonspectator.com/article/523561

The last statement seems odd to me . . . If that's the case, what about feral cats are aren't habituated to people? It's been a tough winter, it was probably just hungry :( I'm writing a letter to the editor, MNR needs an overhaul.

14+kitties
March 5th, 2009, 08:01 AM
:rip: little one :candle:

The last statement is strange to me too. Any animal that is hungry/starving/curious enough will go into a trap. Does not make it a threat to puplic safety! What Spence said just makes absolutely no sense whatsoever!! :frustrated:

Love4himies
March 5th, 2009, 08:07 AM
WTF???????? Is this Spence guy an idiot :wall:. There is no correlation between an animal (possibly starving) going into a trap and being tame. My cats would not go into a live trap that I had outside my house last winter, they sniffed but didn't go in and they are very, very tame.

chico2
March 5th, 2009, 08:50 AM
OMG,the MNR on a killing-mission again,their excuses for killing are always outrageous and inane,makes no sense...I am so sorry this beautiful animal was caught:cry:

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 5th, 2009, 08:56 AM
:candle:

People who know nothing about animals have no space to talk about them, like this Spence person. Another article here:

Hamilton coyotes won’t call Aspen Valley home
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North Star, News, Wednesday, March 4, 2009
by Carli Whitwell | more by this writer

The Ministry of Natural Resources has denied a family of coyotes that have been pestering an east Hamilton neighbourhood a chance to live at the Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary.

Hoping to change the stance, the co-founder of Coyote Watch Canada is requesting the Minister of Natural Resources intervene.

Lesley Sampson, who was acting as a liaison between the city of Hamilton and Aspen Valley said late Monday she was waiting for a phone call from the Honourable Donna Cansfield, Ontario’s minister of natural resources.

“I don’t think the public realizes the end result,” said Sampson, referring to the fact that if the coyotes are trapped, they will likely be euthanized. “They don’t realize there are other options.”

The family of coyotes have been prowling the east end Hamilton neighbourhood for over two weeks now. Sampson said there are indications one is pregnant.

Though the coyotes aren’t displaying aggressive behaviour, they are searching for food, said Paul Buckle, the manager of Hamilton’s animal control office, and leaving them at large is too great a risk for the public.

No humans have been hurt, but two dogs have been injured by the animals, one seriously.

Sampson approached city officials last week to propose an alternate solution for the animals. “We’re not relocating the animals to be released, they will be in a sanctuary type situation,” she said. “This is a rare situation and we are not expecting, nor do we want to set a precedent.”

However, there are a few issues impeding the transfer to Aspen Valley.

The sanctuary is licensed for injured or orphaned wildlife, not nuisance animals, said Jai Longhurst, animal keeper at the sanctuary.

“If it’s strictly a nuisance animal, it’s up to the Ministry of Natural Resources whether the animals are able to come here,” she said.

Bill Murch, information officer for the MNR said it’s likely this won’t happen, since it’s not a legal option.

“We’re probably looking at that one (euthanization) as a likely option,” he said.

But Buckle says the city will do what they can to avoid destroying the animals. This includes aversion conditioning – using tactics to drive the coyotes from the area.

The MNR allows for relocation up to one kilometre away, but coyotes range up to nine kilometres, so they could easily return to the area.

“We can’t leave them where they are,” said Buckle. “All it takes is some little kid, someone who is small enough … if they run away from the coyote, that could conceivably trigger the animal’s hunting instinct and he could view that child as prey.”

Coyotes are notoriously difficult to trap and officials have spent the last week conditioning them to enter the traps that could be eventually used for the transfer.

If needed, Aspen Valley has transport barrels designed for bears that work for coyotes and wolves.

The coyotes could be sedated and transported in the barrels.

Each year, The Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary looks after and then releases orphaned coyotes from all over Ontario. If approved, this would be their first group of “nuisance” coyotes.

Sampson said she would like change to come from this incident, suggesting bylaws should be enforced by cities to prevent humans from feeding wild animals, which officials believe attracted the coyotes to the area in the first place.
http://www.parrysound.com/press/1236186366/

I know that one of the dogs was offleash (I hope the owner was fined). GRR! People are way more at threat by loose dogs than any wild animal. I'll let you know if my letter to the editor gets printed. It's a BEACHSTRIP, wildlife is expected, just like in Toronto with the ravines. If people can't put with wildlife when there's places such as these, they need to move to an apartment or something.

Love4himies
March 5th, 2009, 10:14 AM
I don't see any mention of public education on keeping pets and children safe, which in my mind is the best way to avoid an incident.

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 5th, 2009, 12:13 PM
I don't see any mention of public education on keeping pets and children safe, which in my mind is the best way to avoid an incident.

Amen. I was at Macassa Park yesterday (it's by Upper Sherman) with my two dogs (on lead) and most other dog owners had their dogs offleash :( Offleash dogs are more of a threat than coyotes are.

chico2
March 5th, 2009, 04:55 PM
MOTD,these are not the Coyotes that were in the news,who killed a Chihuahua,right?
The one that was eutheanized(sp)?

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 5th, 2009, 08:23 PM
These were the ones on the Burlington/Hamilton beachstrip. I was there today to see I could snap a picture or two of them, they decided to be typical wild animals and hide for me. Here's hoping they'll be left alone.

chimi1212
March 5th, 2009, 09:16 PM
I just joined the group today,I live in Tucson AZ,my house is across from a wash and open desert and every night we hear the coyote's calling to each other going out on the hunt,they hunt in pack's 4-6 in a group,they have lived here in the desert way before us human's lived here,we hear all the time of family pet's getting carried away,if it was my pet I would be really upset,but that's what they do,they don't know if it's a cat or dog we have all kind's of rabbit's that they chase down,so what are we to do,kill them all,move them some place else,I have a 6 foot wall and I never let my Chihuahua's out alone,In the early hour's as the sun begin's to rise coyote's are seen walking down what will become busy area's in an hour or so,today there was a rattle snake dead on the road in front of my house,they are waking up because it is warm early here,so what to do with the snake's''we also have to deal with bob cat's and mountain lion's the wild life guy's do go out and shoot the lion's if they get to close to people but there again we are walking in there mountian's where-ever a person live's in this beautiful land there is alway's something waiting to eat us or our pet's

chico2
March 6th, 2009, 09:27 AM
Chimi,very well said and welcome to our Forum:thumbs up
If you are ever able to take pics of any of the wildlife,we'd love to see some:thumbs up

MOTD,As far as I know,they killed a female Coyote in Toronto on the order of the MNR,I think the media is keeping it low-key:sad:

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 6th, 2009, 04:02 PM
Welcome to the forum, Chimi! Very well said. It's interesting that you mention rattlesnakes; we used to have them but now they're confined to about two places :( Construction needs to be halted in natural areas or made environmentally friendly. I would love to see pics, too!

That's a shame :( As much as I'd like to see them left as is, it would have been better if they have sent her to the Toronto Zoo where she would have received excellent care. The keepers look after the animals better than a lot of pet owners do. Maybe if the zoo had an educational coyote exhibit, people would learn to appreciate them more. Shame the MNR would probably interfere.

I have to wonder about the beavers on the Hamilton bayfront :(

Chris21711
March 6th, 2009, 04:15 PM
MNR = Ministry of NO response and when they do respond, they never get it right :frustrated:

Chico - did they kill the coyote in TO, I haven't read anything about it.

chico2
March 6th, 2009, 04:29 PM
Chris,I don't recall where I read it,probably the Toronto Star,they killed a female Coyote,they of course don't know if she was the one who killed the Chi:sad:

chico2
March 6th, 2009, 04:31 PM
MOTD,if the Beavers are not there anymore,you can be sure MNR had something to do with it:evil:I know,I blame them for all the evil against wild-life,but I have learned from the past,what that Ministry is all about.

Chris21711
March 6th, 2009, 04:46 PM
Chris,I don't recall where I read it,probably the Toronto Star,they killed a female Coyote,they of course don't know if she was the one who killed the Chi:sad:

Thanks Chico, I read the Star every day, but didn't notice it, although sometimes I think they print our edition three days in advance news is so old :frustrated:

MNR, I have no time for them whatsoever, they don't know their arse from their head, complete waste of taxpayers money, another '1' to add to the heap.

chico2
March 6th, 2009, 04:56 PM
Chris I agree 100%,at the time when they shot hundreds of Cormorants,some very distinguished Bird-people protested,together with bird-lovers like me,to absolutely no avail.
They just don't care about our meager wild-life:yell:
My husband worked for The Star for many years and they do print different editions,the early editions and the once that go outside of Toronto,so the news is often a little different.

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 9th, 2009, 04:45 PM
My letter to the editor got published! I've written others in the past and I'm considering applying to see if I could perhaps do some freelance writing for the paper with regards to animal issues.


Meaghan Edwards
The Hamilton Spectator
Hamilton
(Mar 9, 2009)

Re: 'Coyote caught and killed' (March 4)

I am upset that one of the Beach Strip coyotes was destroyed. The Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) clearly needs to overhaul its policies. There was a responsible organization willing to take it into its care. For more than 20 years, Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary has rehabilitated orphaned and injured wild animals. Animals that are unreleasable are given permanent residence at the sanctuary -- they lead a quality life and receive the best of care. This is not the first time the MNR has interfered with the sanctuary. In 2006, it ordered five unreleasable animals euthanized, and more by the end of that year.

Coyotes are hardly "beach bullies." They are wild animals that eke out a living in a world where people are slow to co-exist with wildlife and fast to pave their habitats.

The only bully is man.

http://www.thespec.com/article/526552

While doing my volunteer work for the SPCA today the former head of volunteering told me how much she liked it. I was so happy :thumbs up

chico2
March 9th, 2009, 04:53 PM
MOTD,that's great,so many people don't watch or read the news,they are just not aware of what is going on in our Province,especially the kill-all-wildlife MNR:evil:

Love4himies
March 9th, 2009, 06:46 PM
Way to go Mom of two dogs :thumbs up

BenMax
March 10th, 2009, 10:07 AM
Mom of two dogs - I want you on my team. Well done to see someone pro-active! You are my kind of people.:thumbs up

NoahGrey
March 10th, 2009, 01:25 PM
Good job, M2D.

ACO22

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 14th, 2009, 09:19 PM
Thanks, guys :)

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 28th, 2009, 10:49 PM
Stay away from the traps, little guys :( "Several cats have been missing"? They're supposed to be INSIDE! :yell:

The city is setting box traps as it tries to nab and euthanize a coyote that has killed one dog and possibly injured two others in the Beaches.

City officials have spent weeks trying to drive the animal away from homes along Neville Park Boulevard, near Queen Street East and Victoria Park Boulevard.

The city became involved in the coyote hunt after learning that the animal killed a six-year-old Chihuahua in February and may have attacked two more dogs in recent weeks. Residents say several cats in the area have also gone missing.

It is against the law for city workers to move the animal to a new location in the wild so it will be euthanized once it is caught.

A representative from Coyote Canada has expressed concerns that someone in the neighbourhood may be feeding the animal, saying it probably would not stay among humans for so long otherwise.

Animal Control is telling people not to leave garbage out and to keep an eye on their pets.
http://www.cp24.com/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20090328/090328_beaches_coyote/20090328/?hub=CP24Home

ANIMAL CONTROL
City lays traps to nab Beaches coyote

JOSH WINGROVE

March 28, 2009

For lack of an Acme anvil or a deep canyon, the city is resorting to your basic box trap to nab and put down an urban coyote that's killed one dog and injured two others in the Beaches.

Toronto officials have spent weeks trying to drive the animal away from homes along Neville Park Boulevard in the area around Queen Street East and Victoria Park Avenue. The coyote grabbed a six-year-old Chihuahua out of a backyard last month. Two more dogs have been attacked since, prompting the city to step in.

Residents had been feeding the animal, which was becoming emboldened around humans, city officials said. City crews used air horns and paintball guns in failed attempts to make it frightened of human activity, city spokesman Rob Andrusevich said.

"The animal simply has not responded to it."

Yesterday, the city laid out traps to ensnare the animal, which officials believe could soon attack a person or another dog. Ministry of Natural Resources regulations restrict where the city can relocate the coyote - preventing officials from simply taking it to a rural area - but they allow crews to euthanize it once it's captured.

"It really is regrettable. We've made credible efforts to try and put fear back into this animal so we wouldn't take this step, but it just simply is not responding," Mr. Andrusevich said.

Box traps have been laid out in the ravine surrounding Neville Park Boulevard, in an area bounded by Kingswood Road to the west, Victoria Park Avenue to the east, Queen Street East to the south and Bracken Avenue to the north. City crews are asking people to stay away from the traps and not to go looking for the coyote.

The city expects it may take several days to trap the coyote.

Sean Maxwell, whose dog Zoe was killed, is pleased with the move, saying he believes the coyote poses a risk to his family and neighbours.

"Certainly I'm supportive of the city."
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20090328.COYOTE28ART2159/TPStory/TPNational/Ontario/

chico2
March 29th, 2009, 09:41 AM
Once again the MNR is sentencing an animal to death,several of the people in the ravine area want the life of this beautiful animal spared,but the MNR,wants it killed:evil:won't allow the Coyote to be moved.
Killing one,is like stepping on an ant,there will always be more...then what:sad:

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 29th, 2009, 06:02 PM
Exactly :( This is all revenge based BS. People are still letting their dogs and cats loose and/or unsupervised :mad: Nevermind the coyotes, don't people remember about poisonings? Sounds bad of me, but anyone leaving pets unsupervised should be charged with feeding wild animals, in addition the leash law fines. And who's to say the coyote ate the cats? They might have been euthanized by TAS, again because stupid people don't get it.

I saw this on the news and it touched me that people are signing petitions to save the animal. I shot off an email to Miller about it, telling him to send it to the Toronto Zoo for an educational exhibit, or Aspen, instead of euthanizing it. Though I have the feeling that since they didn't allow the Hamilton coyote to be sent to Aspen, they probably won't let it be sent to the zoo or the sanctuary :( Stupid MNR.

Good grief, another example of the hysteria. It's just like the pit bull hysteria all over again.

http://www.theobserver.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=1499482
Cardboard coyote frightened jogger, brought police

SHAWN JEFFORDS

The Observer

A cardboard cutout of a coyote designed to scare off Canada geese in Centennial Park proved so realistic it prompted an attempted police takedown.

City hall staff saw the animal cutouts advertised and, hoping they might help reduce goose droppings in the waterfront park, spent $60 on a pair and set them up last summer.

But after a few weeks the cutouts vanished.

“We just figured vandals took them,” said Terry McCallum, Sarnia’s director of community services. “You can’t put up any really fancy signs in the park because they usually disappear.”

But the full story has only now emerged.

A jogger out for a run early one morning came across the coyote cutouts and was so startled she ran to a nearby construction site. There she told a worker a coyote had “barked” at her and she was afraid it would give chase, McCallum said.

The worker called 911 and Sarnia police were dispatched. They arrived on the scene and quickly surrounded the coyote, only then discovering it was made of cardboard.

The police, smelling an elaborate prank, confiscated the cutouts.

“They do look pretty real,” McCallum said. “We don’t want to embarrass anyone, the police or the jogger. It’s an easy mistake to make. Maybe they look too real.”t

Sarnia Police chief Phil Nelson said hadn’t heard about the incident.

“That’s news to me,” he said, laughing. “I know some of them look pretty realistic.”

McCallum said the plans is to return the phony coyotes to Centennial Park this year to see if they actually work.

Coincidentally, Blue Water Bridge Canada said this week it intends to buy some of the $30 props to frighten off geese in parkland under the bridge.

“They might want to let the Point Edward OPP know they’re putting them out,” McCallum offered.

“Just in case.”

Mom_Of_Two_Dogs
March 30th, 2009, 05:19 PM
GREAT news :thumbs up

Toronto coyote gets reprieve
Last Updated: Monday, March 30, 2009 | 12:47 PM ET Comments10Recommend17
CBC News

A coyote roaming the Beach neighhbourhood in Toronto will not be euthanized after all, but will instead be relocated to a zoo or wildlife area outside the city, says a city councillor.

Toronto Animal Control officers were poised to euthanize the coyote after it killed a small dog last month and continued to return to local backyards.

They said they had no choice after Ontario's Ministry of Natural Resources refused to issue a special permit allowing the animal to be relocated outside the city.

Under provincial rules, the coyote could only be moved one kilometre away, which would have kept it within city limits.

Over the weekend more than 200 people signed a petition to save the animal.

Coun. Sandra Bussin, who represents the neighbhourhood, said Monday that Minister of Natural Resources Donna Cansfield changed her mind and issued the special permit.
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/2009/03/30/coyote.html

I'm hoping he gets transferred to the Toronto Zoo. I'm a member so I'd be able to visit him often :)

BenMax
March 30th, 2009, 05:21 PM
So wonderful that people gathered in numbers to sign the petition. It just proves that something can be done when people voice their opinion in numbers.

Great work for all those that faught for this coyote.:thumbs up

chico2
March 30th, 2009, 05:26 PM
WOW,somebody listened,that's unusual,but good news for the Coyote:thumbs up

NoahGrey
March 31st, 2009, 11:18 AM
Good news for the coyote. Funny, though that at first the first thing that TAS wanted to do was hire a company to shoot it. Now, they are fighting for the coyote.

Could it be that since TAS is a animal-welfare organization, someone actually got smart and thought oh, this looks really bad. And now they are fighting for the relocation of the coyote.

There first thought should have to been, how can we protect this animal.

Good news for the coyote.

ACO22

BenMax
March 31st, 2009, 11:30 AM
Good news for the coyote. Funny, though that at first the first thing that TAS wanted to do was hire a company to shoot it. Now, they are fighting for the coyote.

Could it be that since TAS is a animal-welfare organization, someone actually got smart and thought oh, this looks really bad. And now they are fighting for the relocation of the coyote.

There first thought should have to been, how can we protect this animal.

Good news for the coyote.

ACO22

I have seen organizations grow. What was once their mandate changes through a change of management. Whatever their motives (if any at all) - it sounds all good.

We as individuals become more educated and are also more pro-active based on knowledge, experience sometimes purely by the influence of others. Whatever the reason, animal welfare and awareness is striving forward to make decisions based on the changing of times, attitudes and a growing number of activists. I am pleased to see changes of heart every day. It's great!

NoahGrey
March 31st, 2009, 12:46 PM
BenMax, I agree..whatever their motives are, they are giving the coyote the upper hand. Giving it a chance.

I was just saying that them being an animal-welfare organization, their first thought should have been to what resources can we use to protect this animal. It really bothers me that what should have been their first thought, was second.

Yes, organizations grow, but in my opinion sadly..with this organization, I think it was more a case of scurtney from the public and not from the heart. This is a government agencie that has to look at everything they do.

but the coyote now has the upper hand, as it should. Just hope that they follow though and if it is trapped, they do relocate the coyote.

Coyotes are hard to trap though. They are to intelligant. It is very hard to trap a coyote or fox for that matter.

ACO22

BenMax
March 31st, 2009, 01:37 PM
BenMax, I agree..whatever their motives are, they are giving the coyote the upper hand. Giving it a chance.

I was just saying that them being an animal-welfare organization, their first thought should have been to what resources can we use to protect this animal. It really bothers me that what should have been their first thought, was second.

Yes, organizations grow, but in my opinion sadly..with this organization, I think it was more a case of scurtney from the public and not from the heart. This is a government agencie that has to look at everything they do.

but the coyote now has the upper hand, as it should. Just hope that they follow though and if it is trapped, they do relocate the coyote.

Coyotes are hard to trap though. They are to intelligant. It is very hard to trap a coyote or fox for that matter.

ACO22

Oh I hear you ACO22. Regardless if they are bowing to public pressure - this animal along with others will benefit. Sometimes organizations (whether a front or not) must change with the times or for own personal again to regain the confidence of the public. As long as the animals will be saved....I am good with that.

chico2
March 31st, 2009, 04:39 PM
As am I,he is a beautiful animal,maybe something good will come out of this,people will care more about their cats and spend time outside with their dogs:thumbs up

Margo Kram
April 2nd, 2009, 10:40 AM
I'm not sure putting this coyote or the next one that replaces it and the one after that into zoos would be a great thing. They will be living in a cage for the rest of their lives after all and who knows what kind of cage that will be. There is no good answer fro this coyote. I've been reading that peopel in the area have been feeding it and that's why it's become less afraid of people in the first place. Maybe now with all this publicity people will learn to stop feeding and attracting the coyotes.

Love4himies
April 2nd, 2009, 11:13 AM
Definitely the best way to keep coyotes away is to have no food source.

NoahGrey
April 2nd, 2009, 07:54 PM
I'm not sure putting this coyote or the next one that replaces it and the one after that into zoos would be a great thing. They will be living in a cage for the rest of their lives after all and who knows what kind of cage that will be. There is no good answer fro this coyote. I've been reading that peopel in the area have been feeding it and that's why it's become less afraid of people in the first place. Maybe now with all this publicity people will learn to stop feeding and attracting the coyotes.

Margo, This animal would go to a animal sankuary or on protected land. and yes, it is funny that it is us humans that have created this problem, yet blindly of course don't see it. It's sad that with our intellingace, we are the least compassionate specie's and do nothing about it to fix it.

People can be stupid.

ACO22