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Please help me keep my puppy!

LynnN
February 20th, 2009, 10:02 AM
A little history about the pup:
At about 3-4 months the 'Biscuit' was found by animal control. This particular animal control destroys dogs not claimed after 3 days, however there is a WONDERFUL family that claims as many of these animals as they can and tries to place them in new homes. So 'Biscuit' found a new home at this time. I have been told that it was a "foster home" and I was told that the new owner had a stroke and became partialy paralysed and wasn't able to keep him, either way, he went back to the family that rescued him. Enter my family, after 2 weeks, we were able to pick him up and bring him home. He is a 40 - 50 lb 7-8 month (old yellow lab / german shepard cross) pup at this point.

We are: family with a 5 YO, two other lab / shepard X, both 9YO one with hip displacia, two older cats and chickens. We live on a small farm, with a busy highway on one side and lake (frozen currently) on the other.

Now to the problems. The dog simply doesn't seem to WANT to listen.

When we brought him home, he was happy to chase a stick or ball 'off leash' (he started off leash and when he started to show an inclination to wander I put a long leash unteathered). We have had him 3 weeks now and he now just wants to run like heck! (ok, I wouldn't mind if he would come back on recall, but he ignores us when we recall) so he needs to be tied. Two days ago, he figured out if he used enough fource, he could break free (two collars- one of which was a training collar and one rope - tied while I did a chore outside that I needed both hands for). Now he tried to break free EVERY TIME we go out (rather dangerous with the amount of ice outside, and he has nearly hurt me a few times). So this puppy who has energy to burn needs to be kept on a short leash. - So I am looking for advice to get this fellow listening and not darting while outside. (update while typing this message he just chewed his short leash while untied... NOT impressed!!!)

Issue two is the cats - he is a puppy and curious, but he wants to play. I have taught him leave it - and after one try, he seemed to get it - he will leave a treat, but forget it when he is pestering one of the older dogs or sees one of the cats - any idea how I can get that situation calmed?

Barking - he will bark and whine for no reason at all...he will just sit and whine, I suspect it is boredom, but any attempt I have made to get the whining to stop hasn't been successful.

He also has seperation issues - I can not go upstairs for even a few moments without whining and barking, and have to crate him if I go outside for even 1 minute or else he is damaging our wood door

I guess the question here is what can I do to turn this around?! Hubby is completely fed up, and is ready to take him back NOW, but he has given me one week to see some improvement. HELP!!!

Mouthov
February 20th, 2009, 10:28 AM
Wow, my heart goes out to your family,he sounds like a hand full. I always grew up country style with big dogs and they loved it, sometimes would wander off for a whole day. I can try to understand your frustration we have a little breed puppy right now and it is so different to do this all over again sometimes you just wish they would be that lazy dog that does nothing but that is no fun. I really have no advise just wanted to say good luck and I hope you get to keep him. Keeping in mind of course your stuff is going to get ruined mine ate all the corners of my new baseboards...just keep being persistant and lots of love, praise and treats seem to do the trick and hopefully he comes around, hope your husband gives him time. He has been shuffeled around and I am sure he wants a place to call home for good, you just need to break him.
Good luck and let us know how it goes, maybe treat him like a baby all over again and start from scratch but beware it will take time...this I am sure you know you have other pets but proablaby had them since they were ity bitty not 7 months of big BOY dog...:dog:

BenMax
February 20th, 2009, 10:33 AM
He is a puppy that has been bounced around so 1 week is not going to fix all these minor problems.

If your husband does not have the patience and will not support you on actively working on these problems collectively then you might as well call it a day. Sorry to be pestimistic but that is the reality.

Firstly being a young lab - he will explore. Also he has alot of energy to burn therefore he needs alot of exercise. In saying this he must always be monitored. Labs and goldens are big babies until age of 3 or 4. They are loving active dogs that require stimulation to satisfy their instincts and needs.

In order to rectify these problems this dog needs consistancy, routine and more importantly structured training. You must go back to basics as in walking him on leash (leash training), sit, stay, here etc. I would suggest obedience school with a trainer that will cater his training as per your lifestyle and his requirements.

In a nutshell - all this is very normal and very workable. However, 1 week will not give you that perfect dog that will spin on a dime.

Can you 'train' a child in 1 week? Answer is no - so why would we expect animals to be trained in such short notice when humans are 'suppose' to be superior and we cannot train them.

BenMax
February 20th, 2009, 10:44 AM
LynnN - send TotallyHip a visitor message. This person is very knowledgeable and may have some tips for you. This person has helped alot of people here on Pets.

Best of luck to you.

lUvMyLaB<3
February 20th, 2009, 10:54 AM
sorry, sounds like you are having such a hard time.. but when you rescue a dog it is important to be commited, you knew what kind and age of dog you were getting, these are all normal issues for a puppy to have, especially one that has already had such a hard time in life. It is too bad, I don't know what you or your husband were expecting, but it is unrealistic for him to expect a perfect dog after what it has been through, a week is not long enough, not even close.

If you are not going to keep him I think it best that you return him asap. before he gets attached and has his heart broken again. It will be hard enough for him at this point.

What about attending classes? Working on obidience training will solve a lot of your problems, he will learn what the status of every person including him is in the family and he will start to have some respect. He needs EXERCISE and a lot of it. It is not resonable to think he should be happy while teathered, he will try and break off, of coarse, and will try to chew things. Find him some toys and bones and teach him what is ok to chew on and what is not. get him really tired every day, with walks and play.

For the seperation problem, when he whines do not return to him, not even for dicipline, any attention is better than none in his opinion. Start by leaving for a minute if he is quiet return and reward him, then gradually make it longer. It is understandable, that this guy would be worried about people leaving, eveytime he has loved someone they have walked out a door and not come back, it is important to earn his trust.

I think you should get some help, perhaps from the rescue you got him from. Sometimes rescue dogs come with issues, your dogs seem within the realm of normal for a big happy puppy. It is important to know this before rescuing, so that no one ends up in this situation of having to return a dog for behavior issues.

If you are commited to him, and willing to work with him everyday and give him what he needs than your problems will be solved, he doesn't know what he is doing is wrong, he needs to be gently taught what is ok and what is not, he needs love and needs to trust. If you cannot do this for him then let him go to someone who can, the more he gets shuffled around the worse it is for him and the more likely someone will end his life, and that is too bad, he just needs love and attention. Good luck I hope it works out and your husband comes around.

LynnN
February 20th, 2009, 12:22 PM
Please allow me to clarify... We have had puppy for 3 weeks, while we don't expect to have a perfect puppy, some sign of improvement would be nice. I totally get that the breed has lots of energy and this is why I have tried exercising him first off leash then with long leash. When he broke is metal training collar I was holding the 15 foot leash, let me tell you, my sholder still hurts from that one. Also, tieing him up - he was tied for 15 minutes with a 25 ft rope while I went to the busy highway for mail. I thought that having him tied outside would be preferable to crated. I fine with him exploring, I am happy to walk around with him, but that doesn't seem to be his plan

I thought that I went into this with my eyes open, one of our dogs was rescued as a puppy (so needed to be trained from scratch) and the other was rescued at 2 years (again, we were the 3rd owner that we know of).

We did make a comitment to help this dog when we picked him up, however, I will agree with my husband that he was supposed to be part of our family, not make our family miserable, and that is pretty much what he has been doing for the past 3 weeks.

Thank you for the replies so far, and I will try to send a PM to the poster that was suggested

BenMax
February 20th, 2009, 12:45 PM
LynneN - all dogs are as unique as us humans are. Our needs vary from one person to another - an animal is no different.

3 weeks of misery as you put it really is very little time in which to expect a dog to correct some of his already learned behaviour or survival behaviour. It takes time and patience to 'reach' that poor soul. He needs someone who is going to guide him patiently. I can read that you are stressed, infact everyone is for that matter. This is not going to help him overcome certain behaviours. He needs someone calm, and someone that will give him structure.

When I say leash training, what I am trying to relay is structured leash training: heal, sit, wait, here, ignor, figure eights, walk, trot, etc.... Not leash training on a long leash as it provides him with very little unless all the other important training has been accomplished.

Did you contact the rescue group for tips and/or advice? Sometimes they have trainers that can assist you.

luckypenny
February 20th, 2009, 01:00 PM
What I find helpful in calming the most rambunctious puppies is to tether them to me using a 10 foot leash...both outdoors (when I have work to do) and indoors, and always after they've had plenty of off-leash or long-leash exercise. Tying a leash around my hips helps me remain solid on my feet with larger dogs. It most often gets worse before it gets better but the puppy 'craziness' usually extinguishes after a day or two. The trick is to keep it up for several weeks even though the pup seems to have calmed. Having them tethered to me ensures that I always know where they are (when not napping in their crates), and allows me to correct (using "uh uh") and redirect. This helps address all sorts of undesired behavior such as inappropriate chewing, chasing cats/dogs, etc.

Don't be surprised if your pup will chew on the leash, pull like a maniac, jump up on you, etc. You can liberally spray a taste deterrent product such as Grannick's Bitter Apple or hot chili sauce on the leash to prevent him from chewing on it (don't let him see you apply it). Always remain calm and gently walk into him if he's jumping up on you...please don't yell or knee him...you want him to associate being tethered to you with pleasantries. If tying him outdoors isn't working, then please crate him after plenty of exercise with a tightly stuffed Kong, a chewy he enjoys, or even a really squeaky toy such as a Cuz. Mental stimulation is just as important as physical, especially with a highly active dog.

And please remember to praise and treat him when he's done something you approve of. Determination, patience on your and your family's part will soon show you much improvement.

Wishing you and your pup the best of luck :fingerscr.

lUvMyLaB<3
February 20th, 2009, 01:09 PM
I think classes would really help. He needs training. he is a puppy that has had it bad, and doesn't know that he is making you misserable, that is not his intentions, when you walk him, leash train him, so that he learns that the leash is an extentin of your arm and needs to be respected as such, putting the leash is his mouth he needs to learn is not acceptable. I agree with luckypenny, I have had good success with umbilical training also, they will learn a lot when you do that.. he will come around if you give him a chance and the effort! Lots of us have had similar problems, they can be fixed, and we do understand your frustration.

luckypenny
February 20th, 2009, 01:20 PM
I agree with luckypenny, I have had good success with umbilical training also, they will learn a lot when you do that.. he will come around if you give him a chance and the effort! Lots of us have had similar problems, they can be fixed, and we do understand your frustration.


What makes it so successful is that it becomes a habit for them to follow you around. Depending on one's living environment, it's not always necessary that a dog walk in a heel with their nose perfectly aligned with your knee :shrug:. Training can always be spontaneously incorporated throughout the day...it keeps the dog on it toes, so to speak, and makes it fun which provides a much more positive learning experience. The dog will always be looking to you for it's stimulation rather than looking elsewhere for it, it's just a matter of providing it.

LynnN
February 20th, 2009, 02:08 PM
I am NOT negating the amibilical training - my concern though is that my other dogs will be jealous. I am already seeing some of that with the amount of time that I spend with training him. If I take him out alone for training they are sad, if I send them out so I can train him inside they are sad. If they see me training, they want in too (and interfere).
Other concerns would be that the dogs are not permitted upstairs in our house (we have quite steep stairs and do this mostly for the safety of our displacia guy) and I would not be interested in crating him every time I go to the toilet or bring an arm of laundry upstairs (the upstairs cleaning has already suffered A LOT)
Any insight on this is welcome

I will certainly spend more time with the leash training (as soon as I can get out to buy a new one - darn dog! BTW - there was hot sauce on the leash he chewed because he was bored). I haven't really focused on leash training as leash walking is not part of what we do here - the ONLY time the other two are ever on leash is at the vets and only because they require it. I have been working more on basics like sit / down and most important COME!

Just so that you know, your responses are making me feel more hopeful!

As I said, we aren't expecting miracles in 7 days... be we are hoping for a turn around, some sign that he is bonding and WANTING to listen. From his speed of learning how to break a collar, and how quickly he learned 'leave it' he is a very clever boy, I would love to see it manifest in possitive ways!

LynnN
February 20th, 2009, 02:16 PM
In response to asking the place we got him from for help - the people we picked him up from are not an 'organization' they are simply a WONDERFUL kind hearted family that does what they are able to save these poor dogs from being destroyed - every dog they have rescued would be dead now if not for this amazing family!

luckypenny
February 20th, 2009, 02:26 PM
Do your other dogs know their basic commands, Lynn? Why not train them all together (sits, stays, downs, etc) but just keep the youngin on a leash? Our guys learn much faster when their buddies are getting rewarded for the right responses.

Have you tried the umbilical training yet? The first time our dogs saw me doing it with a foster, they were like, "hey, where're ya going? We wanna come too." After a few hours, they also learned that it was no big deal and didn't interfere. If anything, they know they're safe from puppy's incessant torturing :D.

I have two children, sibling jealousy is normal but can dealt with if I don't make a big deal of it. As long as each has some special time with me, we don't encounter any problems. The same can be said for dogs. Because the pup is tethered to you, doesn't mean you're paying all your attention to him. Just go about your daily routine. You'll soon see that you'll hardly notice he's even there.

LynnN
February 20th, 2009, 02:39 PM
I haven't tried ambilical training, but you are inspiring me to try. My other two are well trained. I may try training basics together with my girl, but getting the biy with displacia to do the work out seems unkind (he has a rough time with getting up and sitting hurts) I certainly tried training together with 'come' so that he sees me loving up the other two when they come and not restraining them just giving them treats / loving up - no success there.

I do walk around with treats in my pocket (as long as I HAVE pockets) and spontaniously give a comand and reward him for listening

luckypenny
February 20th, 2009, 02:43 PM
I think in your big boy's case, it'd be alright to cheat and treat him just cuz you love him :cloud9:.

Btw, have we seen any pics of your furbabies yet :rolleyes: :goodvibes: ?

totallyhip
February 20th, 2009, 02:58 PM
Hi Lynn

I don't know that I can totally help you (thanks for the compliments BenMax) I think everyone here has given some great advice. From the sounds of it he just sounds like a puppy that is full of energy and needs training! I will try my best :)

Firstly I recommend that you do NILF (Nothing in Life is Free) or sometimes its called No Free Lunch. Basically what you do is make the dog work for everything that they want. If you want your dog to be attentive and well behaved, there are a few steps you, the owner, need to take to help your dog on their path to obedience. Make a list of everything your dog likes (food treats, play toys, car rides, walks, a scratch on the chest, etc.) These things are the dog's unconditioned reinforcers. What that means is these are privileges your dog expects, when they should in fact be rewards they earn. Think what would happen if you gave a child everything they want without requiring anything in return. That child would become a spoiled little brat. So will your dog is you neglect this rule. A sample list of a dogs unconditioned reinforcers could be: Playing Frisbee ; Fetching a tennis ball; Food treats ;
Going for a walk ; Going for a ride in the car ; Having his ears rubbed ; Having his chest scratched etc.
These “goodies” should not be given for free. Instead, give your dog an obedience command before giving him anything he likes. Another thing that is important is to be consistent !
Dogs don't understand “sometimes” It's all or nothing.

I would steer clear of the hot sauce on the leash. I know you don't want him to chew it but imo hot sauce is not a good deterent. He needs lots of exercise. How much exercise is your dog getting a day? Take him for long walks. These can be also training walks where you work on his leash obedience, sits and downs, heels etc. What I do is a big walk and then some training. Keep him on leash do not let him off leash. At 5 months his recall isn't going to be great. I wouldn't take a dog off leash until I had 110% of recall.

The whining and barking is boredom. What do you do when he does this? If you acknowledge it, it creates more of a problem. Even if you say "its okay, or quiet!" it still acknowledging it and makes it worse. I imagine it is boredom. Sounds like he is bored and full of energy. Even just playing with him...throwing a ball around or giving him a kong might take away some of his boredom. My guess is that your older dogs don't play with the puppy? due to their hip problems? Usually if there are other dogs in the home they help to burn off the energy.

As for the cats you will need to keep training him to leave the cats. It is constant. Give him an outlet for his chase behaviour so he doesn't go after the cats. Teach him to chase a ball or a frisbee. If his energy level is run off more he will learn to stay calmer around the cats. Reward any positive interactions he has with the cats. You have to keep the cat training up. Even people I know who have had dogs and cats for years still need to remind the dogs.

The crating is a great training tool. How does he like his crate? Does he still bark and whine in it? If you leave the door open will he automatically go in and lay down. The crate is great for ssep. anxiety if introduced properly. Again I can't stress enough how wonderful I think the Kong is in the crate. It challenges them mentally and burns their energy up while they try to get thigns out of it. Stuff it full of things. Peanut butter, yogurt, bananas, treats, kibble, rice.

Good luck. You have some really good advice from people here. It probably wouldn't hurt to look into some formal obedience training with a good trainer or a qualified behaviourist too.

As BenMax says all dogs are different like humans. And it all depends on their past and their situation. 3 weeks is really not that long. The key is to be consisent and have a solid routine that the dog can adjust easier. And yes stay calm. If the dog senses stress than it makes it harder for them to adjust.
Please keep us posted.

LynnN
February 20th, 2009, 04:03 PM
Totallyhip! thank you for all of your help!

Please allow me to question a couple of things

Keep him on leash do not let him off leash. At 5 months his recall isn't going to be great. I wouldn't take a dog off leash until I had 110% of recall...Teach him to chase a ball or a frisbee How do I do that without having him off leash? :shrug: I guess that is a huge part of my problem! How do I give him enough exercise (within time constraints) that I tire him out! Last week (before breaking the collars and rope) he was getting 45 minutes in the morning and afternoon plus a couple of 15 minute periods through the day tied up outside while I went into the chicken coop, the woodshed (dangerous as it is halfway to the highway) or the mail box. there was also about 2 or 3 toilet breaks as well - this would be a trip outside for potty without vigerous play, but I will let him sniff around and explore a little as long as he isn't yanking me off of my feet - not ment to be a training session as I am in my PJs for at least one of those potty sessions! :p I can give him about three hours a day between play and formal training (potty and pop quizes not counted) but I don't see that being enough to wear him out on a walk! Heck running after a stick or a ball for 45 minutes wasn't enough to wear him right out 2 weeks ago! LOL! - now before anyone says only 3 hours? That is just his exercise plus several short training sessions a day.


"I would steer clear of the hot sauce on the leash. I know you don't want him to chew it but imo hot sauce is not a good deterent" I guess HE taught me that by chewing through it! LOL! I had the leash on him at that time because I had been taking him away from bugging the other dogs - I got him distracted with his kong and I guess when he got his treat our that was the next best thing to chew :frustrated:

"Think what would happen if you gave a child everything they want without requiring anything in return. That child would become a spoiled little brat" Yes... I am learning THAT too! The hard way ;)

He 'likes' his crate. That is to say that he will go in for a nap sometimes, and learned very quickly (3 meals?) that we expected him in his crate while we eat meals (judging by his behaviour one of the previous owners must have let him hoover the floor and beg at the table). He now (on his own) goes to his crate when I set the table and stays there until we get up - I don't close the door to the crate.
BUT when we leave the house he is devistated and cries and barks like crazy. We often get some barking and crying when we go to bed. I have found that by saying "go to sleep" (from bed) he is reassured that we ARE still in the house and settles down right away.

We ARE stressed. I would hate to think that would cause us to have to give up this pup!

Thank you everyone for the time you are taking to respond! You really are inspiring me to keep trying! And today HAS been a much better day with him! We found a game outside that kept him going for quite a while and even allowed me to let go of the leash with out him running... except once, and he came back after less than one minute that time!:)

LynnN
February 20th, 2009, 04:12 PM
Here is my little trouble maker!

totallyhip
February 20th, 2009, 04:16 PM
He looks really innocent!!!

Totallyhip! thank you for all of your help!

Please allow me to question a couple of things

Keep him on leash do not let him off leash. At 5 months his recall isn't going to be great. I wouldn't take a dog off leash until I had 110% of recall...Teach him to chase a ball or a frisbee How do I do that without having him off leash? :shrug: I guess that is a huge part of my problem! How do I give him enough exercise (within time constraints) that I tire him out! Last week (before breaking the collars and rope) he was getting 45 minutes in the morning and afternoon plus a couple of 15 minute periods through the day tied up outside while I went into the chicken coop, the woodshed (dangerous as it is halfway to the highway) or the mail box. there was also about 2 or 3 toilet breaks as well - this would be a trip outside for potty without vigerous play, but I will let him sniff around and explore a little as long as he isn't yanking me off of my feet - not ment to be a training session as I am in my PJs for at least one of those potty sessions! :p I can give him about three hours a day between play and formal training (potty and pop quizes not counted) but I don't see that being enough to wear him out on a walk! Heck running after a stick or a ball for 45 minutes wasn't enough to wear him right out 2 weeks ago! LOL! - now before anyone says only 3 hours? That is just his exercise plus several short training sessions a day.

Is there not a fenced area that you can go to do this? or can you put up some sort of fencing temporarily? I know alot of dogs are different with their energy levels. My 3 get walked 4 times a day. With the mid day walk being a full 1 hour power walk and the other 3 min. 30 mins. My boys can still go on like little energizer bunnies :rolleyes:


"I would steer clear of the hot sauce on the leash. I know you don't want him to chew it but imo hot sauce is not a good deterent" I guess HE taught me that by chewing through it! LOL! I had the leash on him at that time because I had been taking him away from bugging the other dogs - I got him distracted with his kong and I guess when he got his treat our that was the next best thing to chew :frustrated:

Maybe try puttin him in his crate for a time out when you want him to settle down and not chase the dogs or the cats?

"Think what would happen if you gave a child everything they want without requiring anything in return. That child would become a spoiled little brat" Yes... I am learning THAT too! The hard way ;)

Yes I think alot of people learn this the hard way :laughing:

He 'likes' his crate. That is to say that he will go in for a nap sometimes, and learned very quickly (3 meals?) that we expected him in his crate while we eat meals (judging by his behaviour one of the previous owners must have let him hoover the floor and beg at the table). He now (on his own) goes to his crate when I set the table and stays there until we get up - I don't close the door to the crate.
BUT when we leave the house he is devistated and cries and barks like crazy. We often get some barking and crying when we go to bed. I have found that by saying "go to sleep" (from bed) he is reassured that we ARE still in the house and settles down right away.

this is great that he likes his crate and you have found something that works on him!!!! See there is a llight at the end of the tunnel :)

We ARE stressed. I would hate to think that would cause us to have to give up this pup!

I certainly hope that you will keep up with the training and hope that you don't have to give him up. This is totally workable just needs some time and patience. Sometimes its hard to see the big picture when the steps of improvement are little tiny baby steps. Hang in there :)

Thank you everyone for the time you are taking to respond! You really are inspiring me to keep trying! And today HAS been a much better day with him! We found a game outside that kept him going for quite a while and even allowed me to let go of the leash with out him running... except once, and he came back after less than one minute that time!:)

I'm glad that today is a much better day! With training you have to keep in mind that somedays are going to be great! But somedays maybe not so great. Just don't let that frustrate you. Keep in mind the times that are good!

clm
February 20th, 2009, 04:23 PM
I have no suggestions, but totally feel for you still dealing with 2 rambunctious almost 2 year old dogs myself.

I just have to say, that pic makes him look dead innocent. :laughing:

He's adorable.

Cindy

LynnN
February 20th, 2009, 04:45 PM
Thanks! He IS a cutie pie!:dog: AND besides the problems, he IS a good natured dog and darn smart! I hate that he is causing SO much stress in our home

lUvMyLaB<3
February 20th, 2009, 10:37 PM
*awe* he is adorable!! again all I can say, is he is young, and is acting normal. You wont see a difference immedietly using any of these techniques, but rather an improvement over time. He will get it, but you have to keep working at it, he does not know he is a bad boy when he does those things, he is looking for love, I cannot imagine what goes through his mind. I would not worry about the sep anixety too much, again I think it is because his loved ones have gone out a door and never come back and his life gets flipped upside down, he has been through a lot in his short little life. I think the more you work with him, and the more he learns to trust and love you, it will settle down when he learns that you are not leaving him.

It would be a really good idea to go to classes or get a trainer. I also would always be using a leash and not having him run free. everytime he does not come when called it is only reiforcing that.. I hope that it works out, and just understand, and try not to stress about it, it is normal part of your life now, just work him into your routine, he can sense stress and will take advantage of it, it is important to always always be calm around him, even when upset, otherwise he will think he is the stable one and think he needs to be the leader, give him confidence to surrender his leadership to you. Good luck, keep at it, and soon you will have an amazing best friend promise!

Alos, there is no such this as too much excersise lol! keep his brain busy too! just because he does not respond immedietly, does not mean it is not working, it will take time. I TOTALLY agree with giving him NOTHING for free! and also try the umbilical, being tethered to you, even if you cant do it ALL the time, even just a few hours a day. It really really does fix a lot of unwanted behaviors!! GOOD LUCK! he sure is a cuteeee!

LynnN
February 21st, 2009, 07:24 PM
Update! I am actually seeing some improvement!!! :D yippee! Even hubby commented that things are going a bit better! Now! I don't need to see this much improvement every day! just seeing that things ARE getting better us enough!

NOW any imput about how he will take to being put in a kennal for 4 days?:eek:

We had a business trip planned for the end of March that can't (and won't) be cancelled. The other two dogs will be left in the house and my inlaws come over twice a day to let them out, feed the cats, chickens and collect the eggs. I would have serious concerns with them being able to handle Biscuit AND, he couldn't be left crated for that length of time even if they could

totallyhip
February 21st, 2009, 07:26 PM
I am happy to hear that you are seeing improvement. Like I said before keep the improvements and the good days in mind. There may still be some set backs and be ready for that but don't let it get to you. Soon they will be farther and few between! Good Luck!

angeldogs
February 21st, 2009, 07:43 PM
He is a handsome boy.
That is good that you are seeing improvement.

LynnN
March 5th, 2009, 03:35 PM
Well, in large part to all of you who replied, Biscuit is still here! We did see an improvement, and from my original post he has calmed down quite a lot!

More than the training tips you gave me, you all reminded me that I was spoiled! LOL! the more I thought about it, all of these behaviours were things my old boy did (maybe a couple of months younger) You reminded me to be patient. We still have our moments (and lots of them! LOL!) But I think that Biscuit has found his forever home!:pawprint:

Thanks to each and every one of you! :highfive:

lUvMyLaB<3
March 5th, 2009, 05:07 PM
that is awesome to hear! puppies can be a handful, but like childbirth we seem to forget as time passes! lol, he looks like an amazing dog, keep it up and with training you will have an awesome dog to share your life with, glad to hear he has a forever home and I hope everything continues to work out for you!

LynnN
March 5th, 2009, 06:49 PM
that is awesome to hear! puppies can be a handful, but like childbirth we seem to forget as time passes! lol, he looks like an amazing dog, keep it up and with training you will have an awesome dog to share your life with, glad to hear he has a forever home and I hope everything continues to work out for you!


I have not forgotten a single agonizing moment of my 43 hour labour!!! ;)

you guys made me look at the GOOD things that we had achieved instead of the bad ones! THANKS again!

DaisyDuke*
March 13th, 2009, 03:31 AM
From his speed of learning how to break a collar, and how quickly he learned 'leave it' he is a very clever boy, I would love to see it manifest in possitive ways!

When I was training my girl to walk on a leash and obey she had serious problems. Slipping out of collars and such. I took her into a Total Pet (only local pet store in my area) and had her fitted for a training collar. Made of some type of metal - it looked somewhat like a torture device but came highly reccomended. The lady on the store tested it on her arm for me first, then on mine to show me no matter how hard she pulled it would not hurt or choke it. It was also not break her skin no matter how hard she pulled. It worked wonders, within 10 mins of our first walk with it she realized to stop pulling and walk with me. We never had any problems after that. But it can ONLY be worn while walking, it is not an everyday collar. I highly reccomend you look into one. Or even a harness. I'm not sure if someone has suggested this because I did not read through every post. I'm not sure if your still looking but hopefully this can help you or someone else for the future :)