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Vegetarian recipes and ideas.

ancientgirl
January 29th, 2009, 10:39 AM
Hello all! After Aco22 posted not long ago asking about meat substitutes for us veggies, I thought it might be a nice idea to start a thread where we can share some ideas.

I know some here are also vegetarians, and I know sometimes it's a little challenging finding things to eat that are both good and adhere to our lifestyle.

I will share a couple of recipes with you and a little idea for breakfast.

Last weekend I bought some Morningstar "sausage" patties. I've never tried them, but I thought I could use them to make an egg/cheese/sausage sandwich like the ones they make at McDonalds and BK. I haven't actually eaten the "sausage" patties on their own. I have however, been adding them to my sandwich and it's actually just as good as the real thing.

I toast an English Muffin, while I'm making myself an egg(and Vlad/Oksana/Kiska scrambled eggs). By the time our eggs are done, the toast is done, and the "sausage" patty is also heated (45 sec in the microwave). I put the cheese on first, add my patty then the egg and there you have it. A sausage/egg & cheese sandwich for a tenth of what it would cost me at Micky D's or BK and it was vegetarian. Oh, I buy cage free eggs, too.

For a nice lunch or dinner I've also made lettuce wraps. I've given this recipe out before. It's unbelievably simple and fast. I buy the Yves (or any other brand you like) ground rounds and heat that as specified. I usually like heating mine up in a skillet with coconut oil. It gives it a nice flavor. Then I just take some lettuce leaves, I've used endive before and it works well, and place them on a plate. I cut some tomatoes and get the shredded cheese ready.

Once the ground is heated, you just spoon it onto the lettuce leaf, add some cheese, then top it with tomato. I also use some Greek or Italian dressing as a sort of dip sometimes. It's good and fast and VERY filling.

This recipe I found on the back of a health insurance newsletter. I haven't tried it yet, but it sounds yummy.

Moroccan Slow Cooker Stew

Ingredients:

1 spray cooking spray
1 small onion, chopped
1 medium garlic clove, minced
1 medium butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch cubes*
1 cup baby carrots (I'm thinking I'd substitute this)
1 cup canned crushed tomatoes
1/2 cup vegetable broth
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
15 ounces canned chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1/2 teaspoon table salt (I like to use sea salt)

Instructions:

1. Coat a small skillet with cooking spray. Add onion and garlic; saute for 5 minutes.

2. Place squash in a 3-quart or larger slow cooker (crockpot). Add sauteed onion and garlic, carrots, tomatoes, broth, cinnamon, cumin and red pepper flakes. Cover and turn on to low heat; simmer for 6 hours.

3. Add chickpeas and salt. Stir, cover and heat for an additional 5 minutes. Yields about 1/13 cups per serving.

Top with plain, fat-free Greek yogurt to help cut the spice. (I'm guessing this can also be left out or substituted.)

*Partially cooking a hard-shell squash makes it easier to peel. Pierce the gourd in several places with fork, microwave on high for 6 to 10 minutes, depending on the size, and then peel.

Okay, so that's it folks. I hope some of you enjoy these ideas and I hope some of you can join in and share.

You don't have to be a vegetarian to enjoy these things or give some ideas. Maybe you have a favorite recipe that is easy to convert to a vegetarian meal. I know I can for sure use some ideas!

CearaQC
January 29th, 2009, 11:30 AM
Add mushrooms to your diet, lots of them.

http://www.world-of-fungi.org/Mostly_Medical/Stephanie_Ingram/NUTRITIONAL_VALUE.htm

Buy good quality brand crushed tomatoes in a can to make nice pasta sauces or even as pizza sauce. The crushed tomatoes are good because all the skin and seeds are gone and you're left with a half sauce consistency which is prime for making good sauce saving you some cooking time.

For a good sized sauce I use 3 cans of crushed tomatoes ($1.10 for a hefty size can here), a couple of onions, few cloves of garlic, 1-2 pounds of mushrooms, bell peppers, etc. Saute the veg and mushrooms in some good olive oil or butter first before adding to the tomato. Mix in some basil or italian spice to taste, a bit of sea salt and ground pepper. I love added crushed dried red hot pepper to my sauce, especially in winter. Makes the nose run and you feel all warm inside to boot. Cook for at least 3 hours on med-low heat.

This sauce makes enough for 3 adults to have two meals worth of pasta sauce. Or one pasta meal, and two pizza meals. My homemade pizza recipe makes 4 "Martha Stewart pan"- sized pizza. I think it's like 14 inches diameter but not sure. But that's the brand of pizza pans I have.

We eat a lot of Italian-inspired meals here.

One I really like to make is canneloni. I use ricotta cheese and spinach as filling for the tube pasta and pour over a watered down version of my sauce and bake in oven, topping off with some parmesan cheese. Same thing can be made with lasagna. The canneloni pasta comes in a box and is specially prepared to be able to be assembled and baked in it's dry form and the watery sauce cooks and softens the noodles in the oven. No need to pre boil the noodles. The box will have this marked on it. I put the ricotta and spinach mixture in a plastic bag, cut a small hole in the corner and use this as a sort of pastry bag substitute and squeeze the mixture into the noodles. Put in a shallow layer of sauce in the bottom of the pan. Add the filled noodle tubes on top of the sauce. When the pan is full top off with more watery sauce and bake. If you can't find canneloni noodles, the manicotti will work just as good, albeit they are slightly larger. In fact I've even made this dish without the special baking pasta and even filled the boil kind and it still turned out well. Just gotta keep an eye out on the noodles and make sure they are soft. If you run out of liquid in the pan while it's baking and notice it's getting a bit dry you can always add more water.

Sorry I don't have a better recipe for you. I never cook with recipes unless it's for a cake or something and eyeball all my measurements. When you measure out 1 tsp salt enough times, you just know how much it is when it's in the palm of your hand.

Watch a video about wild mushroom lasagna vegetarian meal recipe idea.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnPxVlv5peA
Zoom to time stamp 7:35 for the shroomy lasagna recipe demonstration.

Find some giant open mushroom caps at the grocery store when they are on sale. Coat in some flour, then egg, then seasoned bread crumb mixture. Then saute gently in a pan with a bit of olive oil. Coat with some tomato sauce. There you will have a veg version of veal or chicken parmesan without the animal meat. Serve with steamed veg like broccoli or green beans, or even a mixed salad of baby greens.

Here's a recipe for Egg drop soup

4 cup chicken broth or you can always use vegetable broth
2 beaten eggs
1-2 minced green bunching onion
1/4 tsp white pepper
1 tsp cornstarch + 2 tsp water

Boil broth. When it is at a rolling boil, add the white pepper and add cornstarch/water mixture. (This thickens it ever so slightly to enable the egg mixture to not just float at the top.)

Remove from heat. Don't want it actively boiling at this time and just needs to sit there hot. Use a fork to add the egg mixture in ribbons a bit at a time until you run out of egg in the bowl. Once all the egg is added in, GENTLY stir it with your fork to loosen up the egg a bit. But not too much. You don't want scrambled egg in soup, but silky ribbons of cooked egg throughout. The egg will cook immediately when it hits the hot broth.

Add the chopped green onions and serve it up. Yum!! I use this a lot for my oriental meal nights, along with homemade cabbage based egg rolls and a stir fry.

You can add peas, sliced water chestnuts and even sliced mushrooms into egg drop soup if you like.

Eggless/Milkless Chocolate cake

1 1/2 cup flour
3 tbsp powdered cocoa
1 tsp baking soda
1 cup sugar
1/2 tsp salt
5 tbsp oil
1 tbsp white vinegar
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup water

Slap it all together in a bowl, mix well and bake in greased pan at 350 F until done. (Toothpick stuck in middle comes out clean) Then sprinkle on some powdered sugar.

ancientgirl
January 29th, 2009, 11:38 AM
All of those sound delicious! The sauce sounds easy to make, and it would last me a while. I like the idea of the mushroom as well.

I'm going to make the egg-drop soup this weekend. I love egg-drop soup! Does it re-heat well though?

And for sure I'm making that cake!

Thanks!

pitgrrl
January 29th, 2009, 12:15 PM
Vegan Muffins

1-2/3 cup whole wheat flour
1/3 cup rolled oats
1/4 cup raw pumpkin seeds
1/4 tsp. baking powder
1/4 tsp. baking soda
pinch of salt
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/4 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. ground cloves

2 large very ripe bananas
1/3 cup raw coconut oil
1/4 cup (vegan if you care) margarine
1 Tbs. white vinegar
1/2 vanilla
1/3 cup cold water

Mix all dry ingredients together until well blended.
In a separate bowl mix coconut oil, margarine, and bananas (mashed) together until smooth. Add remaining wet ingredients and mix well.

Make a well in the middle of dry ingredients and pour in the wet ingredient mix. Stir lightly only until the two are combined, but no more. Lumps are fine.

Fill muffin tins 3/4 of the way up and bake at 350 for 20-25 minutes.

Eat 5 in a row, straight out of the over and then complain that you're too full to eat a reasonable dinner.



Vegetarian (hippie ass canadian lady) Pad Thai

1 pkg. wide rice noodles
1/2 pkg. cubed firm tofu (not silken-it's a disaster)
big handful bean sprouts
variety of veggies (carrots, broccoli, mushrooms, peppers, zucchini, whatever you like) cut into relatively similar sizes
3-4 shallots thinly sliced
big handful fresh corriander, chopped coarsely
1 or 2 eggs
oil

1/4 cup vinegar
1 Tbs. sugar
1 tsp. paprika
2 Tbs. tamari
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper (optional)

Soak rice noodles in a bowl of hot water and set aside.

Mix vinegar, sugar, paprika, tamari and cayenne pepper together in small bowl or jar and set aside.

In a large frying pan or wok (non-stick is easier) heat about a Tbs. of oil on a med-high setting. Put tofu cubes in and allow to get crisp, flipping the pieces over only after a few minutes to crisp the other side.

Add all the veggies and sautee until just barely cooked. Really, just barely. This should only take a few minutes.

Make a hole or well in the middle of pan (meaning the veggies would be in a ring around the edges of the pan) and crack eggs into the space. Break up the yokes, like making scrambled eggs. Drain water from the noodles you've set aside and place the noodles on top of the veggies and egg. Put a lid on the pan and wait a few minutes to allow egg to cook.

Take the lid off the pan, pour the vinegar, sugar, etc. mixture over everything and toss the whole business around to combine everything. Continue until noodles are soft (won't take more than 5 minutes).

Put in bowls, topp with generous amounts of shallots and eat your heart out.

CearaQC
January 29th, 2009, 12:30 PM
My aunt made that choco cake for one of her church groups and she said it disappeared pretty quick. hehe I like it too because it's fast to make. Probably could reduce the sugar to 3/4 cup. I'll try that the next time I make it.

Oh thought of another recipe which is why I'm replying again. Cabbage rolls.
You can make a large Pyrex pan full of these and freeze for later. They freeze well.

Buy a large Savoy cabbage. This is the crinkly brainy looking cabbage. Cut out the stem from the bottom a bit and boil slowly until you can start to peel off the large leaves easily. If there is too much of a rib on the leaves you can slightly shave that off but don't damage the leaves. You want them whole but not mushy. I boil the cabbage first instead of taking it apart in raw form because it's really crunchy and easy to tear. But when boiled, it's softer.

Get a rice steamer if you don't already have one. We got ours for $30 when it was on sale. I will never ever again cook rice in a saucepan because when steaming it's always fluffy and never clumpy like in a reg pan.

Cook some rice. Add in some saute onion, garlic or whatever other type of filling you want. Add salt/pepper and any spices you like. Let cool.

Let the cabbage leaves cool a bit too so you can handle them easy.

Put in some rice mixture and roll up the cabbage leaves into a little tucked-in parcels.

Place into pyrex pan and cover with one or two of those taller cans of heinz premade tomato sauce. And bake til all bubbly and hot. Add some cheese if you like on top. I always add mushrooms to this as well. Could probably also cover with a cheese sauce, cream mushroom soup or just about any type of sauce I would think.

We can eat 2 large rolls per person before we are stuffed. But as always with rice, that full feeling doesn't last long. lol When the rolls are cooled you can put into a container or even plastic bags to freeze. Then simply thaw out, heat up again in the oven or microwave. We don't own a microwave so I just reheat in oven at 200 F until hot.

It makes a healthy meal. We aren't vegetarians and I always add very hot italian sausage to cabbage rolls for an extra special flavor. But of course it's not necessary.

ancientgirl
January 29th, 2009, 12:54 PM
pitgrrl, those sound great. I'm going to write down what I'd need, because that Pad Thai sounds like something I'd like to have soon!

CearaQC, I've never been a huge fan of cabbage, but I've warmed up to it. If these freeze well, I can make some and bring them to work for lunch! I can get a rice cooker for cheap. LOL, I'm Cuban, and most Cuban households have rice on a daily basis, so you can find a good rice cooker for $20-$30 around these parts.

CearaQC
January 29th, 2009, 01:03 PM
I'm going to make the egg-drop soup this weekend. I love egg-drop soup! Does it re-heat well though?

Yeah it will reheat fine. You can halve the recipe. 2 cup broth and one egg. Just don't stir it to oblivion and rip apart the egg too much.

Remember tomato sauce will freeze beautifully.

You can make your own soup stock too. Fill large pot with water, add in whole peppercorns, bay leaves, stalks of celery, parsley, some onions, carrots and broccoli stalks. (I steamed the broccoli tops for another meal.) I did this just two days ago and the broth was lovely. Strain the stuff out and you got some nice broth. Can freeze it as well. For the soup I put in a bit more chopped onion, carrot, soup noodles and some leftover frozen green beans that I had.

Broccoli soup I make when fresh broccoli is on sale. I use stalks and tops. Saute onions in some butter or margarine. Mix in a bit of flour to make a roux. Pour in some broth a little at a time and stir well to get rid of any lumps. Dump in your chopped broccoli chunks, add some milk, salt/pepper, maybe some cheddar cheese and you got yourself one heck of a soup that also freezes well. Good with crusty garlic bread. *drool*

Hmm let's see. How about a veggie pot pie? Make double pie crust recipe. Line baking pan with crust, fill with veggies and some cream of whatever soup, spices and put top crust on, sealing well. Put a couple dabs of butter on top, slice a steam vent in crust and bake 'til done. Yum yum Comfort food. I use a frozen mixture of chopped veg that I precook slightly (which has carrot, potato, turnip, green bean and onion) but you can use canned too. I add in a bit of summer savory or thyme. Make mini versions of this to freeze with pastry uncooked and bake later.

All this talk of food... I'm getting hungry!

Tonight I'm making rice with a bit of chunky tomato spaghetti meat sauce leftover from last night and steamed veg on the side. Kinda like an italian version of chili I guess. lol Gotta get some bread started and steam the rice early.

Oh oh another idea. I usually use tuna for this but you can leave it out. Buy the silver can brand of sweet green peas. Get some canned cream of mushroom soup. Saute onion/garlic (can you tell I love onions? lol) in some butter or olive oil. Put that to the side and saute some chopped or sliced shrooms. Button mushrooms just fine for this. Doesn't matter whether brown or white, both are same Agaricus mushrooms, just a different color. Dump in the condensed soup from the can, add a bit of either broth, milk or water to thin it out a bit. You want this to be a nice sauce consistency. Add in the strained sweet green peas right at the very end and serve on top of rice.

Or you can make another style sauce with mushrooms and cream mushroom soup, add in the smallest size container of sour cream and you got a sort of mock beef stroganoff. Be sure to have your green leafy veg like spinach for iron to go with it.

CearaQC
January 29th, 2009, 01:11 PM
pitgrrl, those sound great. I'm going to write down what I'd need, because that Pad Thai sounds like something I'd like to have soon!

CearaQC, I've never been a huge fan of cabbage, but I've warmed up to it. If these freeze well, I can make some and bring them to work for lunch! I can get a rice cooker for cheap. LOL, I'm Cuban, and most Cuban households have rice on a daily basis, so you can find a good rice cooker for $20-$30 around these parts.

*drool* pad thai. Yum yum yum. Especially when it's nice and spicy with the good hot thai peppers.

Yeah I didn't used to like cabbage either. But now I can't get enough of it. The savoy cabbage won't give you the farts like reg cabbage does. With the cabbage rolls, the cabbage flavor does not dominate at all and is very mild. It merely serves as a wrapping package for the rice and stuff. Another nice thing about the Savoy type cabbages. They aren't as "cabbagey" tasting or smelling.

But I put up with the cabbage farts. lol Grew some plain green cabbage last year, got three heads. One I sauteed sliced fresh with some butter, black pepper and onion and ate it just like that as a side dish. Cabbage was only slightly wilted and parts were still crunchy. The rest went to homemade cole slaw that we put on top of hot dogs and topped that with lots of cayenne pepper. Sounds weird but damn it's good eatin'. Or we would eat the cole slaw as another side dish with home roasted chicken. Lots of stuff you can do with cabbage. But I absolutely cannot stand sauerkraut. It gives me the burps and I'd rather not have a repeat performance of that meal. :yuck:

Like the old funny saying, "Why fart and waste it when you can burp and taste it." :laughing::laughing::laughing:

Khari
January 29th, 2009, 01:25 PM
Just wanted to thank you for starting this thread. I became vegetarian in August/08 and switched my two kitties over to a raw food diet in September/08. This forum has been great for the raw food switch and now I can discuss my vegetarian lifestyle with fellow veggie's as well :thumbs up

ancientgirl
January 29th, 2009, 01:40 PM
Well the only one who will have to put up with cabbage gas from me is the cats, and I put up with their gas so fair is fair.:laughing:

ancientgirl
January 29th, 2009, 01:43 PM
Just wanted to thank you for starting this thread. I became vegetarian in August/08 and switched my two kitties over to a raw food diet in September/08. This forum has been great for the raw food switch and now I can discuss my vegetarian lifestyle with fellow veggie's as well :thumbs up

I became one in May of 2008, and it's been tough. I had no clue on how to go about this, and fell into that hole of pasta and rice all the time. Having some recipes and ideas helps a lot!

onster
January 29th, 2009, 11:59 PM
lol i was going to suggest egypt's national dish, koshari..but maybe thats not the best idea considering youve had too much rice and pasta. Koshari is rice AND pasta AND lentils!! haha (and somtimes chickpeas, with spicy tomatoe sauce and fried onions to boot!) A carboholics dream :D :eek: haha its actually very nutritious and super cheap tho "the beggars meal"

Khari
January 30th, 2009, 06:03 AM
Onster - please do share the recipes - it sounds simple! :) And lentils are a very important part of a veggies diet :thumbs up I am always looking for easy lentil recipes...

ancientgirl
January 30th, 2009, 07:55 AM
lol i was going to suggest egypt's national dish, koshari..but maybe thats not the best idea considering youve had too much rice and pasta. Koshari is rice AND pasta AND lentils!! haha (and somtimes chickpeas, with spicy tomatoe sauce and fried onions to boot!) A carboholics dream :D :eek: haha its actually very nutritious and super cheap tho "the beggars meal"

Woman, you better share that recipe! LOL, it really is a carb addicts dream. It sounds delicious. I love love love spicy foods. I'd probably leave out the fried onions. I love onions, but I don't like them fried and limpy like that.:D

onster
January 30th, 2009, 08:46 AM
ok, im just about to head out but when I come back Ill post the recipe ( it really is easy). Its one of those foods that a street food, but at the same time everyones mom makes.

AG- the fried onions are actually crispy, it takes a while to get them like that you have to be patient but you go past the limpy stage and caramilized stage to get crispy.

This isnt the recipe but if you scroll down after the papyrus and shisha youll see what it looks like essentially http://www.2goglobal.com/2GoChronicals/2%20The%20Essence%20of/egypt.htm...

I dunno if i would say its delicious...I like it but its not my favs but Im pretty odd when it comes to that (most foreigners and egyptians love it)

k im off to costco!

ancientgirl
January 30th, 2009, 09:06 AM
Okay, fried I can possibly do. As long as they are crunchy.

That looked really yummy. I'm pretty open to lots of different kinds of foods. I love spicy foods, and I like that there are a good amount of foods I can eat that are the kinds I like. I had something Indian not long ago, I got it at the Whole Foods hot take home section, and omg it was amazing. So I will try anything that looks good.

onster
February 2nd, 2009, 12:24 PM
Ingredients:

Koshari
• 2 cups rice (short grain)
• 1.5 cups brown/black lentils
• 2 large onions, thinly sliced
• 8 ounces of small macaroni
• 1 small can of chickpeas (optional)
• Water to cook rice, lentils & pasta
• Oil for frying
• Salt


Shatta/ Hot Sauce:


• 1 tablespoon oil
• 2 cloves minced garlic (add more/less depending on ure love 4 garlic)
• 2 tablespoons vinegar
• 2/3 tablespoons tomato paste
• 1 cup water
• Red chili flakes to taste (or any other form of heat)
• teaspoon cumin (optional)


Preparation:

1. Cook the rice as you would normally.
2. Wash the lentils and boil until soft
3. Boil the pasta until cooked
4. Sprinkle a pinch/two of salt on the sliced onions (this helps them to get crispy) and then fry them on medium-high heat until they are brown and crispy - this may take some time. Place them on a paper towel to drain

To make the sauce:

1. Heat the oil in a saucepan
2. Add the tomatoe paste, garlic and water and bring to a boil then simmer until the sauce has thickened slightly
3. Remove from the heat and add the chili, vinegar and cumin

Assembly:

Mix the rice and lentils together then add macaroni & then chickpeas on top. Top with fried onions and add as much sauce as you like. (My mom usually has the rice and and lentils mixed together already and all the other ingredients separate – everyone makes their own dish).


Note:

My mom’s recipe is a bit more complicated. The first thing she does is fry the onions. She then uses some of the oil from the onions for the tomatoe sauce (instead of using fresh oil). Then she boils the lentils. To cook the rice she uses some of the water in which the lentils were boiled (half regular water, half lentil water).

Also, the ingredients for the sauce making (water to tomatoe paste ratio) are kind of a rough estimate since my mom doesn’t measure. The original recipe usually calls for tomatoes that have been peeled and then pureed. You heat oil and then add this tomatoe puree (1 cup) and simmer it until it thickens. Then you add a cup of water and bring to a boil after which you remove from the heat and proceed normally. My mom says that using a puree as such would probably be better. Anyway, my point is you can make the sauce several ways but the idea is that it is tomatoe based, with vinegar at the end and some form of heat. Its supposed to be kinda runny. When I was a kid I just used ketchup instead of sauce because I didnt like the sauce too much.

Finally, we don’t actually use chickpeas for koshari in our house. But it’s a common addition though.

ancientgirl
February 2nd, 2009, 12:55 PM
Onster, thank you so much for this recipe.

I like it, because A. it looks yummy, and B. it looks like it makes a lot. I can make a batch of this and put in the freezer for my lunch. Sheesh, this might last me a couple of weeks. And the ingredients are very inexpensive, which is the best part.

I'd probably not do the onions crispy, since I'd be freezing this I don't think onions would hold up to re-heating. Maybe I can just cut them and add them in for flavor.

I appreciate you taking the time to post this.

onster
February 3rd, 2009, 11:25 AM
Youre very welcome AG. It is a very cheap meal and good for you too. You could use wholewheat macaroni if you like too.

You could easily just make a small batch to try out though for yourself. Theres no specific ratio of lentils to rice to pasta or anything since its a make your own dish kinda deal, so I would try it out first.


I was going to pick up some tofu yesterday to put in my stir fry today but I got so confused with all the different types :shrug: Never cooked tofu at home. Do you know how tofu compares nutrionally to meat? There was also light tofu

onster
February 3rd, 2009, 11:27 AM
Oh and re: the onions I wouldnt freeze them either...they give a nice texture and do taste good (ive been known to pick on onions only :o) but often in our house the onions are finished before the koshari (oops :o:laughing:) so we eat it without, its all good :thumbs up

You could try adding some onion to the sauce to kick up the flavour

ancientgirl
February 3rd, 2009, 11:31 AM
It does look like something you can play around with a bit. I'm sure I'll like it, and I can add a little more spice too.

I'm still somewhat lost on Tofu, which is why I don't eat much of it. When I buy it I do get the firm tofu, since it holds it's shape better. And I've also found there are some brands that have flavors added, like BBQ, or lemon grill types ones. I found some BBQ Seitan at the Whole Foods take home foods section and omg it was amazing. The consistency was very meaty. Have you tried Seitan? I liked it. I'm still not too sure about Tempeh, but maybe because I haven't had it the right way.:shrug:

ancientgirl
February 3rd, 2009, 11:34 AM
Oh and re: the onions I wouldnt freeze them either...they give a nice texture and do taste good (ive been known to pick on onions only :o) but often in our house the onions are finished before the koshari (oops :o:laughing:) so we eat it without, its all good :thumbs up

You could try adding some onion to the sauce to kick up the flavour

Yeah, I thought adding it that way would work well. Of course, I can also just make some independently, just enough to add in to what I'd have at home.

onster
February 3rd, 2009, 11:41 AM
Oh yes, for sure add more spices. I was actually surprised it didnt have that much spice considering most egyptian food uses a lot of spices. I was looking up recipes online for koshari and some people add corriander (cilantro) and parsley. In Palestine, Jordan and Syria it is called Mujaddara, and in Lebanon it is called Mudardara...in those countries dont actually add sauce or pasta at all. They just serve the rice, lentils and onions along with a fresh salad with cucumbers and tomatoes.


I havent tried Seitan, I actually dont know what that is :o Ive had tofu before with veggies in a stirfry I buy on campus, was soooo good. So ive been looking at recipes to use, I think i should probably use firm or medium tofu. Although Im not vegetarian at all sometimes I just get sick of meat/chicken. What do you do with the tofu you buy?

ancientgirl
February 3rd, 2009, 11:47 AM
Oh yes, for sure add more spices. I was actually surprised it didnt have that much spice considering most egyptian food uses a lot of spices. I was looking up recipes online for koshari and some people add corriander (cilantro) and parsley. In Palestine, Jordan and Syria it is called Mujaddara, and in Lebanon it is called Mudardara...in those countries dont actually add sauce or pasta at all. They just serve the rice, lentils and onions along with a fresh salad with cucumbers and tomatoes.


I havent tried Seitan, I actually dont know what that is :o Ive had tofu before with veggies in a stirfry I buy on campus, was soooo good. So ive been looking at recipes to use, I think i should probably use firm or medium tofu. Although Im not vegetarian at all sometimes I just get sick of meat/chicken. What do you do with the tofu you buy?

I love spicy food, so I really enjoy a lot of middle-eastern dishes.

I think Seitan is also a soy product, but made differently. If you ever see it on a menu, give it a try. It's not bad.

When I buy tofu, I try to buy some that has some flavor. The last time I got some it had some peppers in it. It was a little spicy, which was good. I cut it into cubes and added it to some rice as I was making it. I've also used it in a stir fry as well. I like using low sodium soy sauce.

I read somewhere some people crumble it up and fry them like they were scrambled eggs.:shrug:

ancientgirl
February 9th, 2009, 11:26 AM
Yesterday I made the first recipe I posted here. The Moroccan Slow Cooker Stew. Instead of 1/2 cup of vegetable broth, I added the entire can, since I wanted it to yield enough to give me 5 days worth of lunches, and with just a 1/2 cup, it would not have. Of course, by doing this, I sacrificed thickness, but that's okay. I brought some brown rice and added about 1/4 of a cup to what I brought in.

I have to say, it's quite tasty. It has the perfect amount of spice. Enough to give it a kick, but not so much you're constantly trying to fan the flames on your tongue.

It took the minimalist amount of effort on my part to make a great tasting and healthy meal that will last me 5 days for less than one lunch bought at any restaurant or sandwich place near my job.

So this meal was a :thumbs up

Also, for lunch yesterday I made some BBQ Seitan. I had bought some Seitan at Whole Foods and found some good BBQ sauce the day before. I'd mixed the Seitan with the sauce and let it sit overnight. Yesterday I heated it up a bit in the microwave and it was delicious! Another highly recommendable meal.