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Dog potty solution

Granrey
December 29th, 2008, 11:58 AM
Hi,

I did not know how to name this tread but what I want to know which potty solution would you recomend for my future small breed dog. I'm still devating if I should get a dog or not due to this.

In my neighborhood, I have seen the following solutions:

a) the dog does its business at the backyard. I don't like this one because the lawn looks really bad and unhealthy. I think the pee kills the lawn too.

b) The owner takes the dog outside (including, public and private areas) and picks us the poop right away. I don't think my family would be able to do that. we can probably walk the dog once per day for 30 minutes but not twice a day and dogs poop more than twice.

c) The owner opens the backdoor and the dog does its business on its own, on its toilet on the deck. I have seen my neighboor doing this and apparently she cleans the toilet after the dog is done but I ignore how often. The toilet appears to be a flat surface that she puts paper on it. I'll ask her more details on it. This is the best I have seen so far.

I wonder if anyone can recomend something better since this is really important prior we make the decision of having a dog. We don't want to have an smelly house.

ScottieDog
December 29th, 2008, 01:09 PM
First, is your backyard adequately fenced? If it is not, then option A. is not an option. There are dietary supplements that can aid in lawn burn, but are you willing to deal with the dog digging? You will still need to pick up the poop.

I'm not familiar with the dog using the deck, but I would be more concerned about the smell that close to my house. You would need to be diligent in pick up and cleaning. Also, you don't mention the dog breed you are considering, but are the slats in the deck railing close enough that the dog won't slip through? Do you have a gate on the deck? Do you have a grill on the deck? I would not want my dog eliminating on a regular basis on my deck since we do cookouts-bbqs there.

Option B seems the best choice. It really isn't difficult to pick up after your dog. You can get biodegradable poo bags and just put the bag over your hand, pick up and turn the bag inside out--tie a knot. Some bags are even scented if you have worries about this. My dogs only poo 1 or 2 times per day. I always have bags in my pockets of my pants and coats. The dog will need both walks for elimination and for exercise. If your family cannot commit to this, then you may wish to reconsider getting a dog. I have a new dog I am housetraining and we are probably going out 10-12 times per day right now. My elderly dog goes out 4-5 times daily. He gets a short walk first thing in the morning and a long "exercise" walk between Noon and 2 p.m. To judge how often your dog will need to be walked, consider how often you need to eliminate during the day--it will be similar.

Setting a regular feeding time will help with scheduling elimination. Free-feeding will typically have the dog eliminating more frequently. Crate training will provide the dog a safe place and prevent him/her from eliminating in inappropriate places. Accidents will happen. Simple Solution or Nature's Miracle enzymatic cleaners help with smells and stains. In a pinch white vinegar can remove odors.

Decide if the love and companionship of a dog is worth having a few yellow spots in the yard, midnight walks in the rain, and sopping up a few puddles in the house. For most of us on this board it is so worth it. (And our houses don't stink ;)) Good luck with your decision.

Granrey
December 29th, 2008, 10:30 PM
First, is your backyard adequately fenced? If it is not, then option A. is not an option. There are dietary supplements that can aid in lawn burn, but are you willing to deal with the dog digging? You will still need to pick up the poop.

I'm not familiar with the dog using the deck, but I would be more concerned about the smell that close to my house. You would need to be diligent in pick up and cleaning. Also, you don't mention the dog breed you are considering, but are the slats in the deck railing close enough that the dog won't slip through? Do you have a gate on the deck? Do you have a grill on the deck? I would not want my dog eliminating on a regular basis on my deck since we do cookouts-bbqs there.

Option B seems the best choice. It really isn't difficult to pick up after your dog. You can get biodegradable poo bags and just put the bag over your hand, pick up and turn the bag inside out--tie a knot. Some bags are even scented if you have worries about this. My dogs only poo 1 or 2 times per day. I always have bags in my pockets of my pants and coats. The dog will need both walks for elimination and for exercise. If your family cannot commit to this, then you may wish to reconsider getting a dog. I have a new dog I am housetraining and we are probably going out 10-12 times per day right now. My elderly dog goes out 4-5 times daily. He gets a short walk first thing in the morning and a long "exercise" walk between Noon and 2 p.m. To judge how often your dog will need to be walked, consider how often you need to eliminate during the day--it will be similar.

Setting a regular feeding time will help with scheduling elimination. Free-feeding will typically have the dog eliminating more frequently. Crate training will provide the dog a safe place and prevent him/her from eliminating in inappropriate places. Accidents will happen. Simple Solution or Nature's Miracle enzymatic cleaners help with smells and stains. In a pinch white vinegar can remove odors.

Decide if the love and companionship of a dog is worth having a few yellow spots in the yard, midnight walks in the rain, and sopping up a few puddles in the house. For most of us on this board it is so worth it. (And our houses don't stink ;)) Good luck with your decision.

I really appreciate your answer. I'm not ready for a dog yet.

I need to fence my yard, we are being living here for over a year and we dedicated all our efforts on landscaping. We are pretty much done but still have to do the fence next summer.

I think, I'll have to use option B.

The breed? That's another problem on its own. I've been researching for over a year and the decision changes quite ofter. After using dog breed selectors, all the answers were beagle, toy fox terrier, boston terriers, bulldog, but there is always an issue with these breeds.

My wife and I like beagles but I noticed this breed sheds too much. I was even offered one for free with supplies (the dog was causing allergies to the owner) but I declined just to that fact.

I need a dog that is small, shed/Odor are minimum, well behaved with kids is a must. It must also be a couch potato.

My latest choice is italian greyhound. It must also be a rescued dog with basic potty training.

I'm still researching because I have to make the best decision I can.

pbpatti
December 29th, 2008, 11:07 PM
I am having a tough time with your thread, are you ready to bring a pet into your home? If you are then don't worry about the grass dying, or the stains on the carpets because this will happen. To me dogs are the best thing since PB & J, they comfort you when you are lonely and down, they make you laugh so hard that they bring tears of joy when they do silly things. Take a look at some of the pic's on this site they will show you what silly "people" they can be and what joy they bring to a household. Perhaps bringing an older rescue dog into your home might be choice.

ScottieDog
December 30th, 2008, 09:08 AM
Granrey, I'm glad you said you appreciated the reply. After I posted I was concerned that it seemed I was coming down a little too hard. It is wonderful that you are putting time into researching and finding just the right dog--dogs are a 12-15 (or, God-willing, more) year commitment. I think I was voicing some of my frustrations. Hubby and I brought home a 2 year-old non-housetrained dog less than 2 weeks ago. I'm working very hard to get her trained. Hubby is great, but doesn't understand the when she has to go--it is now! Not let me get my coat, wait until the next commercial, etc. And I would love for us to take both our dogs out for their morning walks on his days off; he wants to sleep in :sleepy: so I do it one-dog-at-a-time by myself.

Like you, I don't have a fenced yard, so every walk is on-leash. You are right, you may not be ready quite yet, but I bet you will find a dog that will totally steal your hearts.

Since the thread is about potty issues, I also want to mention that it really is a good idea to monitor your dog's elimination habits. Changes in stool and urine can be indicators of health issues. I saw this with my little Scottie who recently passed. Her health was so fragile that I was having her "go" on white paper plates and paper towels...:cry:

Although I love my Scotties, I never recommend this breed to others. They can be difficult. Good luck with your search. If you have any venues that host dog shows you could go and look at the breeds and talk to the breeders. Quality breeders at the shows will tell you all the negatives for their breed and give lots of educational advice. Good luck with your search. You will know when the time is right.

Granrey
December 30th, 2008, 11:01 AM
My wife and I are new canadians we come from tropical places and even though we have owned dogs before in different countries, we pretty much have the same understanding. In Canada is a total new ball game.

When I was a kid, I owned two dogs in different ocasions (plus many other pets like cats, chicken, pigeons, turtles, crustaceans, etc). I can tell you, I don't have a clue when any of my dogs was going to do his business or how many times per day. We just train them to do it away from the house, since they were off leash during day time.

When I mean "off leash", I mean free to go anywhere on their own. However, they would rarely be more than 100 meter from our home (my dogs were female, males will go far away if they get the scent of a bitch on heat but they would come back). They were always close enough for my call.

They would sleep inside the house when they were puppies to create the bond and later would be on leash sleeping outside but in the morning they would be released for the entire day (its funny, my last dog would go inside the house in the morning and wait next to my bed until I wake up). My father had a motocycle like everybody else as transportation, our last dog would recognize the sound and meet my father on its way home. The dog would recognize the sound almost 500 meters away. The dog would also follow my dad in the morning for about the same distance and return home.

Dogs off leash have many problems for humans and dogs and we try to deal with those problems same as owners in Canada deal with the problems of indoor dogs and that's what I'm trying to learn.

Sheding, odor smell, potty training, breeds, agresiveness*, allergies and size were never a concern because the dogs were off leash and outside the house and they would come inside the house for short period of time.

*Back home we believe, if you keep your dog locked on your backyard or in your house it will become agresive with strangers. Of course, we rarely own agresive breeds. One friend of mine had two dogs, one locked in the backyard and the other one off leash. No need to say which one became agresive.

I hope you don't get me wrong, I need to train myself (LOL) prior adopting a dog and I've been doing that. Potty training is a huge concern to me because I know the smell is bad. I will probably pick after my dog as suggested above.

Dogs are more honest than people. I remember our neighbor dog would follow me and my friends when we were kids. Some how the dog knew were going to adventures away from our homes (in possible danger) and the dog would follow us to make sure we were ok. None of us owned that dog, by the way we all knew the names of the dogs living on our street, same as the names of all our neighbors.

mafiaprincess
December 31st, 2008, 10:40 AM
From your thread, I'm not sure an IG would be the right dog for you. IG's are notoriously hard to housetrain, and many owners rely on a strict schedule to keep their home potty free.. IG's while small are still sighthounds and will require exercise. Being a sighthound they will still bolt after prey.

They need clothing when it's cold out, and prefer sleeping in their owners beds.. They are also prone to separation anxiety. They can also be fragile and can break limbs more easily than other breeds.

Great link from the IG Club of America http://italiangreyhound.org/pages/200about_igs.html#right

I understand that you come from a country where dogs aren't thought of as they are here. Many of us couldn't live without a dog in our homes though, and a potty mess here or there or a sick dog puking on our carpet though it's certainly not fun, doesn't really alarm us.

Short of so called hypoallergenic dogs (which are better than most on allergy sufferers but not truly hypoallergenic) all dogs shed. IGs simply shed really small hairs. Sadly it's a fact of life with having a dog.

I'm sadly not sure from your posts that your household is currently compatible with the changes of life style you would need to have a dog right now. Even the most couch potato dog will need exercise. Even pretty low key dogs might now get enough out of a 30 minute walk once a day. Just something to think about.

DoubleRR
December 31st, 2008, 02:09 PM
Dogs only become aggressive when they are not socialized. Dogs, particularly pups, need to meet LOTS of strangers as they grow up-starting as soon as possible-travel about with you, have many people come to their home, visit schools, anything you can think of. If that is done properly, they can be in the backyard or in the house for long periods of time and still not become aggressive. I agree that perhaps adopting a young adult dog that is already housetrained to go out might be better than a pup for your first dog in Canada. There are several non-shedding breeds, but that means their hair grows continuously and needs clipping/grooming often--another consideration.