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Refrigerated dog food

M & M
December 2nd, 2008, 10:23 PM
Just got back from Hy-Vee and they have refrigerated pet food call Freshpet Select. It has to stay in the refrigerator. The ingredients are chicken, egg, vegetables, 1 oz. brown rice and 18 vitamins. Has anyone heard or tried this dog food?

kathryn
December 3rd, 2008, 07:16 AM
It's fine. I sell it at my job... it flies off the shelves. Very highly recommended by the other employees. Run it under warm water or let it come to room temperature on the counter.

AmericanBullMom
December 3rd, 2008, 07:50 AM
M&M I've never heard of it, but how costly is it? I might be interested in this food!
Would love to hear some more info on it from other members as well!

Edit:
Is it raw? Or just chilled dog food?

luckypenny
December 3rd, 2008, 08:38 AM
I haven't seen it here yet but it was mentioned in the last issue of The Whole Dog Journal. Apparently very popular in Australia where it makes up 20% of all pet food sold. The journal also notes that it's the most expensive variety of food...did you take note of the price? It also has a refrigerated shelf life of 13 weeks.

Here are the ingredients for the chicken & rice meal:

Fresh chicken, poultry liver, ground oats, rice bran, vegetable glycerin, carrots, peas, sea kelp, dried egg product, natural flavors, calcium lactate, maltodextrins, salt, canola oil, parsley, flaxseed oil.

And the beef & vegetable meal:

Beef, fresh chicken, poultry liver, ground oats, rice bran, vegetable glycerin, carrots, peas, sea kelp, dried egg product, natural flavors, calcium lactate, maltodextrins, salt, canola oil, parsley, flaxseed oil.

http://www.freshpet.com/our-brands/index.htm

Calcium lactate is a form of salt that helps with preserving fresh food as well as preventing tooth decay.

Vegetable glycerine, although sweet tasting, is most often used in skin care products.

Although maltodextrin is a naturally derived substance containing easy to digest carbohydrates, it is often used as a low calorie sweetener. It may also cause a reaction to those allergic to corn.

Canola oil, as per Wikipedia, "because of concerns about inhibited growth in human infants, canola oil is not permitted in infant formula by the FDA" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canola .

In addition, 'natural flavour' doesn't constitute an exact ingredient to me. It can be anything :shrug:.

To sum it up, probably not something I'd run out to buy in a hurry :o. I think homecooked meals would be much less costly, fresher, and healthier.