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Cat sneezing

Eleni80
October 22nd, 2008, 06:55 PM
Hi everyone,

Maybe you guys can shed some light here. I have a 14 yr old cat, domestic, and he's the love of my life. A few years ago, he started going through bouts of sneezing uncontrolably (1-2 weeks, no color discharge, no hard time breathing). I took him in and they told me it was the rhinovirus. Meaning, he would most prob. have reacurring episodes. I know he's prob. stressed; we have another cat (3yrs old) and he's like Satan wrapped in cute fur, so they fight quite a bit (although, I think the little one just wants to play). He's sneezing again now and it seems he just went through this a month ago. We've lived with this for a while now, but as he gets older, is there a danger to his health?

Any replies are welcome.

Eleni

I also forgot to mention he has a heart murmur. Not big at all, my vets dont seem to think its an issue.

growler~GateKeeper
October 23rd, 2008, 03:11 AM
Does he have any other symptoms? runny eyes, congestion, runny nose, loss of appetite?

If he is getting reoccuring rhinovirus issues especially while stressed this could open the door to more serious infection especially if they are allowed outside. Being an older cat also means it may take longer, more energy to get over each viral episode which generally lasts 3-14 days.

Since it is a virus that can be passed to others it is possible your other cat may also have fhv

Here is a Site dedicated to the Feline Herpes Virus (aka Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis) http://www.harpsie.com/cat_flu.htm#feline_herpes

There is a supplement called L-Lysine that is generally very good at reducing the severity of symptoms http://www.harpsie.com/cat_flu.htm#l-lysine

Do you have a separate room that the older cat can retreat to in order to have some peace & quiet away from the younger one for at least an hour or so a day? This will go a long way in reducing his stress level.

Jim Hall
October 23rd, 2008, 09:08 AM
i agree l lysine works great for the kits in the shelter and works for du basically find the best food you can for them and get her a safe place .

and .try and wear the kitty out lots of play with him

Eleni80
October 23rd, 2008, 03:59 PM
Thanks for the reply guys.

To answer your questions, he does have a very little bit of runny eyes, and nose. And he does sound congested, from his nose, not his chest. Thankfully, he has no loss of appetite.

They both only go outside in the summer, with cat harnesses on. We live in suburbia and there are forests around; I donít want to chance them getting mauled.

I tested the little one for FIV when I got him about a year and a half ago. I did not put him in contact with each other until the results came in, and they came in negative.

The sneezing started before we got the little one, but it seems that the episodes are more frequent as he gets older. Thatís why Iím concerned. I monitor to see if the discharge changes color, or if he experiences labored breathing. If that happens I know itís an infection, and Iíll take him in right away. Just thinking as he gets older, his immune system might not be able to fight as hard.

I donít have a separate room I can keep them in, although when Cheeto (the brat) starts acting up, we put him in our bedroom and close the door. But thatís a mute point because he likes it and promptly falls asleep on my husbandís pillow.

Thank you for your suggestions, Iíll speak to my vet next time I take him in for a checkup.

growler~GateKeeper
October 23rd, 2008, 09:19 PM
I donít have a separate room I can keep them in, although when Cheeto (the brat) starts acting up, we put him in our bedroom and close the door. But thatís a mute point because he likes it and promptly falls asleep on my husbandís pillow.

The separate room idea was not meant as punishment just a quite place to give them time apart from each other so they aren't constantly fighting.

What you're doing by separating them is good (as long as you're not upset w/Cheeto when you put in him there) cuz it is calming Cheeto down abit & giving the older one some time to himself.