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First time pregnant cat

tamethebeast
October 21st, 2008, 10:04 AM
Hello. My darling princess Oscar, age 6, is expecting her first litter of kittens anytime now. She weighs in at a small weight of 7 pounds and very petite in size (well was until her belly started to grow that is). She is starting to bag up, and although we have placed several birthing areas in the house we live in, she has managed to find a very secluded spot in which she retreats to without us knowing. I am more concerned about her age and size, as well as she has never given birth before. I do have a male the same age (from the same litter, so her brother) but he is neutered, but also concerned about their interactions with each other upon arrival of the new kittens. Her attitude and personality has changed, she is more affectionate towards me and my boyfriend, but chases Sheba (her brother) away if he comes too close to us. I would like to have my mind put at ease as I am worried that she will have problems birthing and such. What should I expect and above all, what should I be paying close attention to upon her queening? Thank you all that reply :) Would also like to add that upon her birthing, the kittens will be going to excellent homes, as friends have stepped in to support me being a first time pet grandmother and Oscar will be going in to get spayed after she has completed weaning her kittens. This would have been done years ago, but my financial situation wasn't co-operating with me at the time, but have been able to afford her yearly check ups and shots.

Love4himies
October 21st, 2008, 10:26 AM
This is a pro spay/neuter forum, please consult with your vet.

AmericanBullMom
October 21st, 2008, 10:31 AM
Good answer L4H.... I was trying to think of the BEST way to put it... no better way then what you said!:thumbs up

Love4himies
October 21st, 2008, 10:33 AM
Thanks ABM, I just can't mentally handle another thread like "Mr. Proud Grampa."

badger
October 21st, 2008, 11:16 AM
There are many websites you can consult for this information. Have a vet who has already seen/cared for the cat on speed dial. You never know.

How many homes have you nailed down? My neighbour's cat, very small and unwell (congenital heart, I think; she caught a cold the other day and I thought it would finish her off) blew up like a football and gave birth to six kittens, one with skeletal deformations and possibly internal weirdness.

If you want to be responsible from now on, adopters should swear up, down and sideways that they will spay/neuter the kitten when it is of age, and not pursue their own 'breeding adventure'. To me, spaying/neutering is up there with recycling, reusing, respect for life and all that other stuff. It is the right thing to do.

Crisse de tabernac!

BenMax
October 21st, 2008, 11:31 AM
There are many websites you can consult for this information. Have a vet who has already seen/cared for the cat on speed dial. You never know.

How many homes have you nailed down? My neighbour's cat, very small and unwell (congenital heart, I think; she caught a cold the other day and I thought it would finish her off) blew up like a football and gave birth to six kittens, one with skeletal deformations and possibly internal weirdness.

If you want to be responsible from now on, adopters should swear up, down and sideways that they will spay/neuter the kitten when it is of age, and not pursue their own 'breeding adventure'. To me, spaying/neutering is up there with recycling, reusing, respect for life and all that other stuff. It is the right thing to do.

Crisse de tabernac!

Your last para is probably felt by all here. I am so disturbed by this post however it has happened and there is nothing that now can be done. But the future of the offspring is in peril.

To the poster - please ensure that whomever is taking the kittens can afford to feed them, vet them and absolutely have them sterilized in order to STOP this cycle. Did you know that MAYBE only one of these kittens will live a happy, healthy life with ONE forever family. The rest will die at some point in their lives. They will be re-homed or put into shelters, get lost, die outside due to humans or their vehicles.

I am however glad that you are able to now fix your cat. This is a horrible misfortune for her, her babies and now you.

tamethebeast
October 21st, 2008, 11:58 AM
Thanks ABM, I just can't mentally handle another thread like "Mr. Proud Grampa."

I am aware that this site is pro-spaying/neutering....in the past years I have not been able to afford to have my cat spayed, always kept a close eye on her to avoid her getting outside while in mensus or heat, but 6 years later I am now expecting her to queen at any moment. I am not a terrible person, and have in the past sacrificed my needs for the needs of my pets, but a $260 vet bill to get the female spayed at the time was not financially feasable. She is strictly indoors as my area is high traffic, and when she got out I was terrified.

As for her offspring, they are not going to be abandoned in some ditch, nor are they going to shipped off to some animal shelter where they will be euthanised. I am just curious as to the health of my cat before, during and after her giving birth. I am feeding her medical kitten food, along with the kitten milk supplement at the moment. Just asking what changes your cats have had in the past after she has given birth and what emergency signs I should look out for, not to be judged, I am just as scared as she is more likely (that is if her thoughts are along the lines of a single soon to be mother) as I love my Oscar tremendously and do not want to lose her. When should I take her in? When should the vet visit be booked for after she gives birth and in the even that she dies during queening as she is 6 (websites have stated high risk after the age of 8, but 6 yrs is still pretty close)what neccessary steps should be taken?

catlover2
October 21st, 2008, 12:04 PM
You better keep your fingers crossed that nothing goes wrong with this small, 6 year old first time queen. If she ends up having to have a C-Section or develops pyometra, you will regret that you didn't spend the $$ to get her spayed. Why is it that people think that cats always have kittens with no problems, it isn't always that way...they can have birthing problems just like people do. I would say her age and size may put her at risk. Good luck!

http://www.petplace.com/cats/dystocia-difficult-birth-in-cats/page1.aspx

Dog Dancer
October 21st, 2008, 12:08 PM
You really do need to be asking these questions of your vet, and making sure the vet will be available to you any time of the day or night in an emergency. You will likely find that your costs for this little "oops" will be much higher than the spay costs would have been, and once this is all done with you'll have another reason not to be able to afford to spay your darling Oscar. Good luck to Oscar, she's going to need it.

aslan
October 21st, 2008, 12:08 PM
unfortunately your vet expense is going to be as much now as it would have in the past to spay her.

ok i would definately take her into the vet now, one to make sure she didn't catch anything from the male she mated with and two two make sure she is progressing along nicely with the pregnancy.

There isn't alot you can do for her now until she starts to deliver, i would definately have the vets number handy incase she goes into distress. As for if something happens to her durring the event. Then you have to get formula for the kittens from somewhere like global pets,petvalue, etc. feed them frequently, love4 could give you more info on that. then each little kitties privates and bums need to be wipe/massages with a warm damp face clothe to promote piddles and poops.

Love4himies
October 21st, 2008, 12:15 PM
unfortunately your vet expense is going to be as much now as it would have in the past to spay her.

ok i would definately take her into the vet now, one to make sure she didn't catch anything from the male she mated with and two two make sure she is progressing along nicely with the pregnancy.

There isn't alot you can do for her now until she starts to deliver, i would definately have the vets number handy incase she goes into distress. As for if something happens to her durring the event. Then you have to get formula for the kittens from somewhere like global pets,petvalue, etc. feed them frequently, love4 could give you more info on that. then each little kitties privates and bums need to be wipe/massages with a warm damp face clothe to promote piddles and poops.

Well said Alsan.

Yup, if anything happens to momma, illness or death, then it is 3 weeks of non stop feedings/stimulating bums/weighing/temp taking/vet visits.
Good momma cats rarely sleep more than an hour at a time for the first three weeks. If the kittens get sick, then it is emergency vet bills, because kittens can't wait until morning, they go downhill soooooooo fast.

If you can't afford the spaying, and really love cats, adopting from a mandatory spay/neuter shelter would be better financially and you can pray that the kitty does not get sick.

ancientgirl
October 21st, 2008, 12:55 PM
Please please take her to the vet. She needs to be looked at first and foremost to make sure she's in good health.

As someone said, the cost for her spay will seem like pennies when you start to add up your cost in the coming weeks. While I'm happy to hear you will not be shipping kittens to some place they will be put down, are you adopting them out? Are you taking care of them yourself? You better hope she doesn't have more than 2 or 3. You will need to take them to the vet at some point as well.

Please have Oscar spayed after she's weened her kittens.

My goodness, she's so small. I keep thinking of my Kiska, she's about that size, and Kiska is a tiny girl.:sad:

Love4himies
October 21st, 2008, 12:59 PM
Just wondering for the future spay: have you checked with your local shelter to see if they offer low cost spay clinics?

BenMax
October 21st, 2008, 01:30 PM
Just wondering for the future spay: have you checked with your local shelter to see if they offer low cost spay clinics?

Good suggestion. Also, you can source out some clinics that offer cheaper spay and neuter programs for those that cannot afford the regular prices.

Also, you can contact a rescue organization and see if they can get the cat into their program thus providing a cheaper rate as well.

TulipRoxy
October 21st, 2008, 08:05 PM
I am aware that this site is pro-spaying/neutering....in the past years I have not been able to afford to have my cat spayed, always kept a close eye on her to avoid her getting outside while in mensus or heat, but 6 years later I am now expecting her to queen at any moment. I am not a terrible person, and have in the past sacrificed my needs for the needs of my pets, but a $260 vet bill to get the female spayed at the time was not financially feasable. She is strictly indoors as my area is high traffic, and when she got out I was terrified.

As for her offspring, they are not going to be abandoned in some ditch, nor are they going to shipped off to some animal shelter where they will be euthanised. I am just curious as to the health of my cat before, during and after her giving birth. I am feeding her medical kitten food, along with the kitten milk supplement at the moment. Just asking what changes your cats have had in the past after she has given birth and what emergency signs I should look out for, not to be judged, I am just as scared as she is more likely (that is if her thoughts are along the lines of a single soon to be mother) as I love my Oscar tremendously and do not want to lose her. When should I take her in? When should the vet visit be booked for after she gives birth and in the even that she dies during queening as she is 6 (websites have stated high risk after the age of 8, but 6 yrs is still pretty close)what neccessary steps should be taken?

I have raised two litters of kittens. One was a pregnant stray that I took in, and raised the kittens. The other was a litter of 5 abandoned ones that were found by a good samaritan and dropped off at my friends vet clinic. I wouldn't worry too much about the health of your cat. Cats are very well fit to handle motherhood...hense the overpopulation problem! They put on lots of weight during pregnancy, so subsequently they have lots of reserve to feed the kitten with. As well they seldom have birthing problems, and require cesereans.

I agree with other posters to look into a low cost spay/neuter program. I know that most areas have them. As well make sure that you talk to all the adopters about getting the kittens spayed or neutered.
Good luck with your litter and cat.

happycats
October 21st, 2008, 08:39 PM
It's just hard to believe in 6 years you couldn't afford (about $4 bucks a month) :shrug:
Seems to me, it just wasn't a priority :sad:

14+kitties
October 21st, 2008, 09:49 PM
Her attitude and personality has changed, she is more affectionate towards me and my boyfriend, but chases Sheba (her brother) away if he comes too close to us.

Her brother will need to be kept completely away from the babies for the first 3 Ė 5 weeks. Momma will be doing everything she can to protect her babies. That means even going after a cat she has known since birth.

Iíd like to have my mind put at ease as I am worried that she will have problems birthing and such.

We canít put your mind at ease. Your vet may be able to though.

What should I expect and above all, what should I be paying close attention to upon her queening?
You need to take her to the vet now for a checkup. S/he may be able to tell you if there may be complications. You need to have the vetís number on speed dial. You need to possibly even have the vet at your home in case of problems or the cat at his/her office. She is an older cat who should never have been allowed to carry kittens. Yes, I know you said 8 years was high risk but when it is a FIRST pregnancy at 6, believe me, itís high risk.
You should be checking out every single web site you can find on queening. You need to talk to your vet. You need to read every single book you can before this birth. We are not vets. We canít tell you what to look for.


This would have been done years ago, but my financial situation wasn't co-operating with me at the time, but have been able to afford her yearly check ups and shots.

Maybe some of those unneeded shots could have been forgone to get her fixed. Most vets also do payment plans.

Just asking what changes your cats have had in the past after she has given birth and what emergency signs I should look out for, not to be judged, I am just as scared as she is more likely (that is if her thoughts are along the lines of a single soon to be mother) as I love my Oscar tremendously and do not want to lose her.

Most people on this forum donít know what changes their cats went through because they got them spayed before they had the chance to get pregnant. Again, we are not vets. We canít tell you what emergency signs to look for. Your vet can. Love should have gotten her to the vet for an emergency spay once you figured out there was a chance of a pregnancy. Like, right after she returned home.

When should I take her in?

Now!


When should the vet visit be booked for after she gives birth

Probably will see her during birth. If you are lucky and she has a good delivery then get her in as soon as possible afterwards. As in Ė within an hour or so. She could still have a retained placenta or another kitten inside.

and in the even that she dies during queening as she is 6 (websites have stated high risk after the age of 8, but 6 yrs is still pretty close)what neccessary steps should be taken?
If she dies during queening the kittens die with her. Sorry, thatís the way it is.

Be prepared to give up your life for at least 5 weeks. That includes work. The babies will need full time help in order to survive. Full time means very, very little sleep for you. They need fed every 2 hours and will not all want to feed at the same time. Kind of like having quads or more. They need to be stimulated to urinate and later to defecate. They need to be kept warm but not hot. They need, they need, they needÖÖÖ.

tamethebeast
October 21st, 2008, 09:52 PM
It's just hard to believe in 6 years you couldn't afford (about $4 bucks a month) :shrug:
Seems to me, it just wasn't a priority :sad:

Not to sound defensived or offend you, in the past working part time hours at minimum wage while trying to live myself, the spaying was a priority but not financially feasable at the time. Hence, that is why I had her as an indoor cat only (with that point said, indoor cats DO live longer than those that are outdoors, or frequent the outdoors). Her shots are up to date and is very healthy and active......apparently you missed my post where I stated that I am not here to be judged. :sorry:

kathryn
October 21st, 2008, 10:10 PM
Yikes... 6 years... ummm... start planning her funeral now... is the nice way to put it. Sorry. Giving birth isn't easy as far as I know. 6 is much too old for a first litter. Ack. Pyometra...still borns... etc. That's like a 50 year old woman giving birth.


Yeah, for what it would have cost to have gotten her spayed it what it's going to cost in vet bills for her now :o Because frankly, she's probably going to need an emergency spay anyways. Those cost a few thousand. Or, I guess if your that broke, you could put her down and save a couple bucks =/ Really... come on now people.... this is not something to be proud of. It's really hard for young cats to get threw pregnancies and have the kittens live. Let alone an older cat.


I have a semi-feral cat outback I call Momma. She's about 5 now and bred her whole life until I finally caught her and got her fixed a few months ago. About half her kittens lived on average... and when I finally got her spayed she was already so bent out of shape from not being spayed she now is permanently disfigured around her stomach. I mean, she's not in any pain anymore,and I love her very much, but in reality it's not something to be happy about when a cat is pregnant, especially an older one.

This is a pro spay neuter board as everyone else has said. There really is no advice we can give you. If you are too poor to afford to spay her, don't get a cat. If something goes wrong with her pregnancy, it will easily cost you a couple hundred bucks, and even then you will loose the kittens or loose her.

Keep an eye out for abnormal discharge or bleeding. Just about anything can happen. She's going to be more prone to infection. I'm really tired right now and can't think of the medical term, but where the kitten(s) die(s) and then the mom cat gets that infection stuff??? someone else knows what I'm talking about.



:wall:

I'm off to go do my rescue stuff for my Georgia urgents for the night...We've got until Thursday to get three 5 month old kittens out of Spalding or they are getting gassed...funding is slow though =/ I've got 12 dogs on the Chattooga kill list for tomorrow morning. I've got a whole lot more at Athens-Clarke county that keep getting held over, including a mom and 9 pups that were owner surrendered. Too much to handle apparently. Huh, never knew puppies could be a pain in the butt?

/sigh. Lets make some more cats and dogs to add to this mess for people like me (and everyone else on this board) to clean up.

I'm out. :frustrated:

Tundra_Queen
October 21st, 2008, 10:35 PM
Hi

If your vet is like mine, u could call and ask questions over the phone and it shouldn't cost u.

I hope Oscar will have a easy birth and all the kittens will be fine.

Debbie

ancientgirl
October 22nd, 2008, 08:57 AM
I feel the need to say something here.

I don't doubt you love your cat, at this point, I just think you have not been as vigilant as you could have been with her care.

I am fully aware of being in need of financial help. I live paycheck to paycheck. I have been living this way for the last several years.

I've had 4 of mine spayed and neutered. The girls costing approx. $300-350 and the boys about $150-200. I cut back on things and was able to do this for them and part of my debt that I have now is because of that. With my last girl, Czarina she was a stray, I took her in to be checked and it turns out she'd already been spayed. Had she not been spayed, my vet said she would have done something to help with the cost. There are programs that they offer through their clinic, paid for by some rescues. The Humane Society here also offers low cost S/N, by low cost I'm talking $25-50 in some areas.

There are many options out there. Believe me, the HS and ASPCA doesn't want any more animals out there with no homes, so they make it very easy for owners to have their pets taken care of.

Your own vet may have been able to counsel you on this.

Make plans now to get her spayed as soon as she's done weening her kittens, because the likelihood of her getting pregnant again is high.

No one is here to purposely make you feel bad. But, you did come across a very PRO spay/neuter bunch of people.

Many here have dealt and are currently dealing with the aftermath of unwanted/unplanned pregnancies. It's not easy, and it's not fun. The cats don't understand what's happening and it is a stressful and dangerous time for them.

Please take Oscar to the vet as soon as possible. She's an older kitty and she needs to be looked at. We can't give you medical advice, we can only ask you to seek it for your girl.

BenMax
October 22nd, 2008, 09:08 AM
I am certain that I will ruffle some feathers here - but I have to say this. When the cat got pregnant why did you not have her aborted? Financially, it will be the same as her having these babies - vetting ALL the kittens and then having her sterilized. (And let's hope she does not have complications which obviously is going to cost BIG BUCKS).

You are not being judged - however I guess most of us here have the endless and daunting duty of re-homing, taking in cats that have been discarded, endless kittens to TRY and find homes for and I can go on and on.

Kathyrn has the terrible job of scrambling to try and save the countless numbers of dogs, puppies, cats, and kittens that are going to be GASSED of all things.

I don't understand I guess....

happycats
October 22nd, 2008, 09:58 AM
I am certain that I will ruffle some feathers here - but I have to say this. When the cat got pregnant why did you not have her aborted? Financially, it will be the same as her having these babies - vetting ALL the kittens and then having her sterilized. (And let's hope she does not have complications which obviously is going to cost BIG BUCKS).

You are not being judged - however I guess most of us here have the endless and daunting duty of re-homing, taking in cats that have been discarded, endless kittens to TRY and find homes for and I can go on and on.

Kathyrn has the terrible job of scrambling to try and save the countless numbers of dogs, puppies, cats, and kittens that are going to be GASSED of all things.

I don't understand I guess....

I agree :thumbs up no feathers ruffled here.

The money thing is still bothering me...........so many here have altered animals that weren't even theirs at their own expense......if you want something bad enough, you find a way! Even if you have to sell something.

canine14
October 22nd, 2008, 10:31 AM
TametheBeast,

Everyone makes mistakes and you tried your best under the circumstances. At least for six years your cat was inside and loved and not on the street where she would be having her 12th litter by now.

I just wanted to say good luck. I am sure she will be fine. Once you have her spayed it will bring you peace of mind. Since your friends are adopting the cats then you can make sure that they are spayed and neutered as well.

IluvZeus
October 25th, 2008, 10:19 AM
When I was much younger, I too had a cat fall under the same circumstances. She was older (almost 5), couldn't afford to get her fixed at the time, she got out and I was terrified. She came back pregnant, unfortunately (or fortunately maybe) Her two kittens died exactly 1 week to the day they were born. It was a horrible thing to go through, as poor Bearcat couldn't bear to go though the second one's dying and pretty well left me to comfort it. I brought her to the vet immediately, and when it was appropriate, I had her fixed. I still harbor bad feelings over letting her get to that state, and after she had passed and I got my dog, I made a pledge to not add any more to the pet population ever. Sorry for the downer message, I do realize that you did try your best to prevent and I hope it all goes well.

Capt. Jack
October 25th, 2008, 11:05 AM
This thread has run its course.