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Dog Toy Aggression

TulipRoxy
October 17th, 2008, 05:27 PM
Hey my friend is having a problem with her Shepherd/Husky mix. When she's in the dog park the dog is aggressive with other dogs when then come near her toy. She recently attacked a GSD that came near her toy, not badly, but the intent was there. I've also noticed that she is aggressive when my friend pays attention to another dog. And she's not great about giving the ball back. My friend is worried because she needs a way to exercise her as she lives in an apartment and playing fetch is a good way.

I've suggested that she teach her dog to always give the toy back on command, as I think the dog feels shes in control of the game and owns the ball. I've also suggested that she give her a time out in a down for 5 minutes if she sees any aggression signs. Any other suggestions?

MommaKat
October 17th, 2008, 05:46 PM
Your friend may want to avoid taking toys to the dog park, it's been in my experience that is more trouble than its worth. If she insists on bringing toys she should go to the dog park when there are not as many dogs like early morning maybe? for fetch she could use 2 balls when the dog brings one back she throws the other one. Teaching "drop it" is sooo good for many situations (like if a dog nabs a chicken bone or dead animal :yuck: )

Does she go for brisk walks or jogs with her GSD? I'm not an expert but when my neighbor had one the normal 15-30 min walks was just just not enough to burn the energy off of him :rolleyes: .

babymomma
October 17th, 2008, 09:11 PM
This dog is a m ixture between to very active breeds, and very protective breeds. This dog is a working animal. And it NEEDS alot of excersize to keep the mind in a stable state of mind. If not she will develope behavioral issues like, toy aggresion. Does you friend try to grab the ball from the dog and pull it out of her mouth?

Frenchy
October 17th, 2008, 11:52 PM
as I think the dog feels shes in control of the game and owns the ball.

Not only the ball , she's in control. I had only one foster with that issue , he attacked one of my goldens ( Daisy) just because she walked by a toy. A behavior specialist told me to take all the toys away and to put the foster on a leash , attach the leash to myself and go about my things in the house. It teached the foster that I was in control , not him. He had to follow me everywhere and stop when I was stopping etc ....

but I agree with not taking toys at the dog park.

mona_b
October 18th, 2008, 12:11 AM
What your friend needs to do is to teach the dog "not" to be toy aggressive.This needs to be nipped in the bud no matter what.;)

Is it just with dogs,or also with your friend?

Here is what your friend can do.

Begin when he's playing with something that you know he's not completely crazy about. The key: don't start by using his favorite toy.
With one hand, pick up the toy.At the same time, with your other hand, produce a treat from behind your back. In order to enjoy the treat, he must release the toy.Return his toy to him after he's finished his treat.Repeat this exercise over many sessions, varying your path of approach, the type of reward you give, and the toy your dog is playing with. Always replace his toy with a treat or toy of a higher value, thereby teaching your dog that giving up something good results in getting something better.

Exercising a dog doesn't alway have to be "physical"...It could be "mental"..

Like hiding a treat somewhere close and asking him to "find it".



Toy aggression is not caused by lack of exercise.It's not being taught to "share"..Think of this as a child.A child who has not been taught to share will grab any toy from another child.Same as a dog.;)

My sister has 3 Huskies.They have been taught how to play nice together....:D

I've raised 3 GSD's..1 was a "working" dog (my current).My other two,had no problems just laying around the house.Sure we went on long walks.Did I feel the need to throw a ball around for hours to burn off energy,no they were not hyper dogs.:)

Chaser
October 18th, 2008, 11:52 AM
I especially agree with Frenchy's suggestion of umbillical training. I also know that when we got Kailey she could be pretty grabby with toys with our other dog, Chase. We regularly practiced (still do), taking a toy away from her and making her work to get it back by doing sit-stays, shake, etc. She's also learned that the slightest bit of aggression over a toy means that she winds up in a down-stay time-out and Chase gets to play with the toy.

Also important: I have to admit I'm with Cesar Milan on the point that playtime exercise is not the same as walking exercise. If she needs to tire her dog out, she should be taking it for long walks. Playtime is an added bonus, but shouldn't be the primary source of exercise. A dog is more liekly to behave badly if it arrives at a park with major energy to burn.

TulipRoxy
October 19th, 2008, 12:16 PM
Your friend may want to avoid taking toys to the dog park, it's been in my experience that is more trouble than its worth. If she insists on bringing toys she should go to the dog park when there are not as many dogs like early morning maybe? for fetch she could use 2 balls when the dog brings one back she throws the other one. Teaching "drop it" is sooo good for many situations (like if a dog nabs a chicken bone or dead animal :yuck: )

Does she go for brisk walks or jogs with her GSD? I'm not an expert but when my neighbor had one the normal 15-30 min walks was just just not enough to burn the energy off of him :rolleyes: .

Yeah she tries to go at quieter times already...

Definately I'm gonna suggest that she walk the dog more. I think that she kinda didnt realize what she was getting into as far as this breed mix goes. She says she can be out for an hour and the dog is still ready to go when she gets back. Walking is different than playing in that the dog has to really be in unison with you, stop when you stop etc.

TulipRoxy
October 19th, 2008, 12:19 PM
This dog is a m ixture between to very active breeds, and very protective breeds. This dog is a working animal. And it NEEDS alot of excersize to keep the mind in a stable state of mind. If not she will develope behavioral issues like, toy aggresion. Does you friend try to grab the ball from the dog and pull it out of her mouth?


Yes, I agree with you there totally. She definately needs more exercise, and more mental stimulation. No she doesnt try to grab the toy, she usually shows her another toy and then she drops the one she has in her mouth.

TulipRoxy
October 19th, 2008, 12:23 PM
Not only the ball , she's in control. I had only one foster with that issue , he attacked one of my goldens ( Daisy) just because she walked by a toy. A behavior specialist told me to take all the toys away and to put the foster on a leash , attach the leash to myself and go about my things in the house. It teached the foster that I was in control , not him. He had to follow me everywhere and stop when I was stopping etc ....

but I agree with not taking toys at the dog park.


I agree with you there. She is by nature a pretty pushy dog, always demanding attention. She is aggressive with other dogs when they come near my friend as well. I have to ask her if she is able to take food or bones away from her without issues... I told her already to not give her attention when she comes and bugs her for it. I'll suggest umbilical training for her as I think it would help her.

TulipRoxy
October 19th, 2008, 12:28 PM
What your friend needs to do is to teach the dog "not" to be toy aggressive.This needs to be nipped in the bud no matter what.;)

Is it just with dogs,or also with your friend?

Here is what your friend can do.

Begin when he's playing with something that you know he's not completely crazy about. The key: don't start by using his favorite toy.
With one hand, pick up the toy.At the same time, with your other hand, produce a treat from behind your back. In order to enjoy the treat, he must release the toy.Return his toy to him after he's finished his treat.Repeat this exercise over many sessions, varying your path of approach, the type of reward you give, and the toy your dog is playing with. Always replace his toy with a treat or toy of a higher value, thereby teaching your dog that giving up something good results in getting something better.

Exercising a dog doesn't alway have to be "physical"...It could be "mental"..

Like hiding a treat somewhere close and asking him to "find it".



This was helpful, thanks. I suggested she teach the dog to drop the toy on command by the same method, but I didnt think to suggest starting with a low value toy and the reward being a higher value toy. That so smart!

She definately needs more mental stimulation. Physical exercise is good but it is not the best solution. You can run your dog for hours a day but if you never exercise his brain then at the end of the day you still have a really hyper dog, but now hes more fit, so tommorrow you're gonna have to run him more! I'm gonna suggest Kongs, treat balls, hide and seek, find it. Also just workind obedience with this dog would be helpful I think.