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Protectiveness over store

ec140466
September 21st, 2008, 01:45 AM
I have a 3 year old pomeranian/sheltie cross who is a great little dog, most of the time. I just started working at a pet store about two months ago and bring her with me everyday. At first she was fine with everything but, now she has gotten quite protective of the store. People are fine, as well as little dogs, but any big dog that comes in she barks and barks (which I know is partly out of nervousness). We are currently using Cesar Millan's method of making her submissive towards the dogs, as well as giving any of her bones to the other dogs to show her that they aren't just her bones. This method is working a little bit, but I would like something more. Any suggestions would be great appreciated!!

TeriM
September 22nd, 2008, 12:46 AM
I don't agree with making her submissive to the other dogs. She could easily be barking due to insecurities and that way will likely make her more fearful. I would instead keep a leash on her and work towards rewarding her whenever she is calm and around a big dog. Currently taking away her stuff is not going to make her look favorably at big dogs. I would avoid giving any bone or chew type stuff at all unless she is alone and away from other interactions, then give lots of tiny, yummy treats when other dogs come in.

ec140466
September 23rd, 2008, 12:20 AM
I understand what you are saying and thought that maybe it could be making her more fearful of the dogs. What, do you suggest I do though in order to get to the point of her being calm around bigger dogs? I do realize that once she is at that point giving treats will help a lot to show her that she is doing well. But at this point she is not calm at all when they enter the store and she will even chase after them no matter how much bigger they are then her.

rainbow
September 23rd, 2008, 01:13 AM
If you tie her leash to your waist you will have more control over her.

Lissa
September 23rd, 2008, 09:20 AM
You've received some good suggestions.

I also think that you should stop taking your dog to work until you have this under control... Its impossible to manage your dog and give her your full attention when you have work to do and customers to serve. By continuing to take her to the store you are setting her up to fail because she is continuing to react to certain dogs. There is no harm in taking her to the store when you aren't working but I think its unwise to continue to do so when you are responsible for the store.

What you are currently doing doesn't sound like it will have any positive effect IMO. I don't know how you are "making her submissive to other dogs" but it doesn't sound good. Secondly, adding something that she could guard (or that another dog could guard) to an already reactive situation is dangerous. It also feeds her insecurities because not only is a larger dog "invading" her space but it is also eating her bone!

Does she react to larger dogs away from the pet store?

I suggest that you enlist the help of a friend with a well-socialized, calm/obedient larger dog (preferable one that your dog hasn't met before)... If she only reacts in the pet store, then set up a time to meet there BUT if she reacts to all larger dogs, regardless of location it would be wise to start in a larger, neutral area. Both dogs need to be on-leash and you need to start below threshold (ie: start from where your dog is calm and non-reactive). From that point you slowly move forward, rewarding for calm behaviour. By slowly, I mean SLOWLY and at your dogs pace. If she is getting tense/anxious from 30ft away, then you stop advancing and end the session on a good note. Most reactive dogs will need multiple sessions from a distance and may not be able to handle proximity until much later in the training. It's important that your friend's larger dog isn't overly excitable and is obedient enough to pay attention to his owner instead of your dog.
The idea is management and setting the dog up for success so that she can easily remain calm which leaves you lots of rewardable behaviours!

At the same time, you need to work on obedience and self-control exercises. "Watch me" and call-offs will likely be the most beneficial but you also want to train some tricks or fun behaviours so that your dog has lots of different behaviours to offer you INSTEAD of reacting!!!

Good luck!

ec140466
September 23rd, 2008, 06:30 PM
Thanks Lisa for your suggestions it sounds like a good idea and I will definitely give that a try. She does only react to larger dogs inside the store but, not anywhere else. We can take her to the off-leash dog park with no problem at all and we can bring dogs into our home without an issue. And another thing is that the owner of a store has a very large bernesse mountain dog and a golden retriever whom my dog can associate with comfortably well in the store together. Which seems really weird to me since if another dog comes in she just starts barking. But I will try your idea by asking my friend to come with me to the store with her dog and let you know what happens. Also, the way we make her subbmissive is by rolling her on her side (one of the other store owners suggested this to us which is why we tried it).

TwoLostSouls
September 24th, 2008, 05:46 PM
Also, the way we make her subbmissive is by rolling her on her side (one of the other store owners suggested this to us which is why we tried it).

Rolling her on her side, if done correctly, makes her submissive to you, not the other dogs.

You must first return your dog to the same place as he attacked from, put him in a calm, submissive position (on the side is best) then move the other dog in front of her nose, facing away from her. The dog she attacked should be sitting with it's back towards her while she is lying down behind it. This does establish dominance to a degree, but the best medicine to make 2 waring dogs friends is to walk them together, but not let them look nor concentrate on each other. After a few minutes of walking together, as members of the same pack, they become friends.

LavenderRott
September 24th, 2008, 06:07 PM
That's what I love about Ceasar. :wall:

"Rolling" your dog into a submissive position when it is upset/excited can be a very dangerous thing to do and doesn't really teach your dog anything of value.

Look at it this way....

You are having a discussion with your mom about politics and voices are starting to rise. Suddenly, your mom reaches out and slaps you across the face!

Are you suddenly calmer? Do you suddenly see her point of view?

A submissive dog is a dog that is afraid of you. Personally, I would rather have a confident, well-trained dog.

How about taking your girl and sitting in front of your little store on your day off. Take a pocketful of really yummy, really stinky treats and every time you see a big dog headed for the store - get her to focus on you for a treat. As she is able to do this without getting excited about the approaching dog, move closer to the door. When you get to the point where you can hold the door open for the customers with the big dogs while your pup sits quietly and waits for a treat - move your act inside!

Postive reinforcement for good behaviour will make her more confident in herself (and you!) and every time she sees a big dog in the store she will go to you for a treat instead of waiting for you to flatten her.

TwoLostSouls
September 24th, 2008, 06:17 PM
That's what I love about Ceasar. :wall:

"Rolling" your dog into a submissive position when it is upset/excited can be a very dangerous thing to do and doesn't really teach your dog anything of value.

Look at it this way....

You are having a discussion with your mom about politics and voices are starting to rise. Suddenly, your mom reaches out and slaps you across the face!

You are confusing punishment with discipline. You are attempting to turn your dog into a human. Dogs are not human and don't think like we do. They are immensely pragmatic and our language means nothing to them.

Nobody said positive re-enforcement was bad, but you can't re-enforce bad behaviour nor is there a way to stop it by using "positive" methods. Perhaps you can explain how making your dog submit is bad. I guess you haven't figured out putting a dog into a submissive position actually calms it down from the upset or excited state it is in at that time.

If your child wants to jump off a balcony, do you stop it or do you say "Good boy" when it doesn't jump off? Everything Cesar teaches works.

LavenderRott
September 24th, 2008, 06:37 PM
You are confusing punishment with discipline. You are attempting to turn your dog into a human. Dogs are not human and don't think like we do. They are immensely pragmatic and our language means nothing to them.

Nobody said positive re-enforcement was bad, but you can't re-enforce bad behaviour nor is there a way to stop it by using "positive" methods. Perhaps you can explain how making your dog submit is bad. I guess you haven't figured out putting a dog into a submissive position actually calms it down from the upset or excited state it is in at that time.

If your child wants to jump off a balcony, do you stop it or do you say "Good boy" when it doesn't jump off? Everything Cesar teaches works.

And you need to read more of my posts. Neither one of my dogs is anywhere close to human nor are they treated in any way, shape or form like my children.

A barking, growling dog is issuing a warning. Period. When a growling, barking dog starts chasing a threat (ie. the big dog, in this situation) then the adreneline is already flowing and forcing the dog into a submissive position can, and often does, lead to a redirected bite. Every single reputable trainer or training organization that has every recommended Alpha Rolls has since changed their position. Except, of course, Ceasar.

If my child wants to jump of a balcony - I sure don't pin them to the floor until they agree with me! What I would do would most certainly depend on the age of the child and it wouldn't involve strong arming the child and probably would involve praise.

I am sure that everything Ceasar says works. However, my dogs behave because I taught them to with consistancy and praise - not with strong arm tactics and fear.

growler~GateKeeper
September 24th, 2008, 07:52 PM
I guess you haven't figured out putting a dog into a submissive position actually calms it down from the upset or excited state it is in at that time.

Not by Alpha Rolling it doesn't, I've had a dominate male growling and snarling and by putting him in an alpha roll it escalated to snapping & biting at clothes.

A simple down is far safer and less confrontational than an alpha roll.

mona_b
September 24th, 2008, 07:58 PM
I'm in contact with a few reputable trainers.These are trainers for the Canine Unit(Police)..One is also the one who trained my current(Retired)..And as they have stated,you NEVER do the submissive roll in ANY situation.Would you do this for a 100lb dog.No,you are only asking for trouble.Like maybe getting your face ripped apart.Think of a Police Dog giving chase.His adreneline is high.He catches the suspect and has a hold on him.The handler gives the word to let go,puts the leash on and pulls him back.Dogs adreneline is still high.Can you imagine the outcome if the handler "rolled" him to calm him down?It wouldn't be pretty.And these are highly trained dogs.

I have actually heard that some handlers(US) have actually gotten bitten trying to pry their dog from the suspect.

You must first return your dog to the same place as he attacked from,

Ummm this dog hasn't attacked.She is "barking".....;)

I guess you haven't figured out putting a dog into a submissive position actually calms it down from the upset or excited state it is in at that time

You don't need to "roll" them to calm them.

put him in a calm, submissive position (on the side is best) then move the other dog in front of her nose,

Oh great,tick the dog off even more.Cause this is what's going to happen.

ec140466,no more rolling...;)..How was your dog with the other two when you started to bring her?Is it a few barks(warning)..Does she stop after a while?Or does she continue?Is there any growling?

A barking, growling dog is issuing a warning

Exactly.

TwoLostSouls
September 24th, 2008, 08:47 PM
I'm in contact with a few reputable trainers.These are trainers for the Canine Unit(Police)..One is also the one who trained my current(Retired)..And as they have stated,you NEVER do the submissive roll in ANY situation.Would you do this for a 100lb dog.No,you are only asking for trouble.Like maybe getting your face ripped apart.Think of a Police Dog giving chase.His adreneline is high.He catches the suspect and has a hold on him.The handler gives the word to let go,puts the leash on and pulls him back.Dogs adreneline is still high.Can you imagine the outcome if the handler "rolled" him to calm him down?It wouldn't be pretty.And these are highly trained dogs.

To quote the great Yoda "Size matters not". I've had Shepherds, Rottweilers, Great Danes and Dobermans and they're all the same. Aggression has to be nipped in the bud. Police dogs are trained to attack, most domestic dogs shouldn't be. Thanks for showing us how to compare apples to oranges. I seem to remember the dog in question as a small breed. Many small-breed dogs misbehave because the owners think they're cute and therefore cannot behave badly. That kind of attitude is why we have a Pit Bull ban in Ontario and why most non-dog people would rather see dogs destroyed than fixed when their misbehaving escalates into something uncontrollable.

Ummm this dog hasn't attacked.She is "barking".....;)

It's still unchecked aggression.

You don't need to "roll" them to calm them.

Indeed, you don't. I was attempting to guide the original author through an exercise s/he was probably doing incorrectly.

Oh great,tick the dog off even more.Cause this is what's going to happen.

Disciplining a dog doesn't "tick it off". Leaving him to his own devices does. If the human is the pack leader - as it should be - the dog has no reason to bark, snap nor attack. If you're worrying about ticking your dog off, it is in control of you, you are not in control of it.

LavenderRott
September 24th, 2008, 09:43 PM
In 30 years of working with dogs, I have worked with everything from 3 pound chihuahua's to 150 pound Great Danes. I have only seen 1 dog that had to be destroyed for aggression reasons - I am sure he probably could have been "fixed" but was unwilling to put another child at risk while trying to overcome the multitude of issues he had from a lousy upbringing. No two dogs are the same - every dog is just as different as every human being. I have yet to meet a single dog that didn't respond to positive reinforcement or a single one that would have simply let me put him/her in an alpha roll.

Sorry, but if you attempt to alpha roll a dog who is acting in an aggressive manner - you are going to get bit. You may not get bit the first time - but you are going to get it. A dog that is amped up enough to need that serious a correction is not simply going to "turn off" because you want it to lay on it's side.

If the human is the pack leader - as it should be - the dog has no reason to bark, snap nor attack. If you're worrying about ticking your dog off, it is in control of you, you are not in control of it.

My dogs bark for all kinds of reasons. I certainly don't require that they live a life of silence. I can tell you that my smaller dog has impecible manners and does whatever I ask of him instantly. I will also tell you that if you EVER try to alpha roll this 8 pound boy, he will remove your finger - unless you manage to put something bigger in line with his mouth. It has absolutely NOTHING to do with whether I am his alpha or not - it has to do with having respect for his space and his not liking to be manhandled.

mona_b
September 24th, 2008, 09:57 PM
It's still unchecked aggression.


Your joking right.Since when is barking unchecked aggression?And who told you this?Dogs bark,it's natural.A dod barking is not aggression.There is dog/dog aggression and dog/people aggression.And yes toy and food aggression.But dog barking,that's a new one for the books.

Disciplining a dog doesn't "tick it off".

Sorry,I beg to differ.adreneline is high,you roll it,and you don't think this would tick the dog off and make matters worse?

A simple down is far safer and less confrontational than an alpha roll.

Exactly.If you need to use "physical" force,then there is a problem.

ec140466
September 25th, 2008, 01:01 AM
ec140466,no more rolling.....How was your dog with the other two when you started to bring her?Is it a few barks(warning)..Does she stop after a while?Or does she continue?Is there any growling? mona_b

When i first brought her to the store before we even opened she did bark at the other two dogs and as well at the two german shepards who came in there at the start as well. At first she would just sit there and bark at them but then she started chasing, but after my boss did the "alpha roll" she stopped which is why i thought that maybe it was working but she still does continue to do it when new dogs enter the store. I did work with her today though and she was beginning to listen more to me and come and sit behind the counter and stopped after i told her shhh ,when she stopped i praised her (she is a little overweight so i dont want to give too many treats, so i think i will try lots of praise for now). I would also like to say though that when my boss did do the alpha roll he never EVER forced her down, she is a very gentle dog towards humans and would just let him do it to her with no snapping or bitting at all. Although I have stopped using the roll though.

14+kitties
September 25th, 2008, 06:58 AM
:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing: I'm sorry, I have visions of this overweight smallish dog running after a larger dog in a store with aisles that aren't so big all being chased by a man who then drops to his knees in order to roll the smallish dog over on its side! All the while the barking going on. :laughing::laughing: Or does he use his foot?? :confused:

You must admit, it's a funny picture. What isn't so funny is what could happen if/when the larger dog turns around and goes after this smaller one who is snapping (yes, I know they snap) at it's heels. The larger dog only wants to defend its haunches.

My suggestion - leave your pup at home where it is safe and out of harms way until it has been socialized in an atmosphere where you can give it the attention it needs to teach it how to behave. That is not in a store in a confined space with customers you are giving your attention to and a dog who thinks it's the boss.

Lissa
September 25th, 2008, 10:14 AM
You must first return your dog to the same place as he attacked from, put him in a calm, submissive position (on the side is best) then move the other dog in front of her nose, facing away from her. The dog she attacked should be sitting with it's back towards her while she is lying down behind it.

Dogs live in the moment...By the time you could accomplish this, the situation would likely be long forgotten. In order to offer any meaningful positive or negative reinforcement, you need to have GOOD timing (like within half a second).... Otherwise the dog will not have a clue what you are up to.

Nobody said positive re-enforcement was bad, but you can't re-enforce bad behaviour nor is there a way to stop it by using "positive" methods.

Maybe I could wait for a slight break in the reacting and then mark and reward or maybe I could reinforce the abscence of full-blown reacting (which is why I said she needed to work her dog BELOW threshold); maybe I could redirect my dog and then get a rewardable behaviour; maybe I could manage the situation.
Perhaps you can explain how making your dog submit is bad. I guess you haven't figured out putting a dog into a submissive position actually calms it down from the upset or excited state it is in at that time.

1. Alpha rollling your dog is based on ENTIRELY flawed research in the 1940s on wolves
2. Dogs are not wolves NOR are we dogs
3. No wolf would ever FORCE another wolf on its back - that behaviour is offered WILLINGLY by the submissive wolf as APPEASEMENT.
4. The only time you'd see a wolf forcibly roll another, is if it meant to kill - so an alpha roll is far from calming
5. No TRUE leader needs to alpha roll, its only the lower ranking animals who have to continually demonstrate their place

What I haven't figured out is why people think that they need to rely on brute force to "teach" their dogs anything. Or why they have to attempt to act like dogs to get their message across.

:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing: I'm sorry, I have visions of this overweight smallish dog running after a larger dog in a store with aisles that aren't so big all being chased by a man who then drops to his knees in order to roll the smallish dog over on its side! All the while the barking going on. :laughing::laughing: Or does he use his foot?? :confused:

:D I needed that this morning! :p:laughing:

BrightEyes
September 25th, 2008, 02:40 PM
not[/I] in a store in a confined space with customers you are giving your attention to and a dog who thinks it's the boss.


I agree whole heartedly with this. If your dog is not totally socialized, then IMO, it has no business going to work with you. And I'm also surprised you would let other dogs chew on "your" dog's bones and then give the bone back to your dog. Maybe it's great that people bring their dogs into the petstore, but how do you know if their shots are up to date, etc..... you DON'T! You don't know if they just came from the vet's office due to an illness or whatever. Sorry, maybe it's just me... but then again, I'm funny that way (but hey, at least I admit it :) )

mona_b
September 25th, 2008, 06:41 PM
I did work with her today though and she was beginning to listen more to me and come and sit behind the counter and stopped after i told her shhh ,when she stopped i praised her (she is a little overweight so i dont want to give too many treats, so i think i will try lots of praise for now).

That's good.:thumbs up..All it takes is "working" with your dog.Keep doing it.;)

Also,you don't need to always use treats.Does she have a favorite toy?You can use that instead of a treat.OR you can get a toy and use it for when you praise her.

I stopped using treats with my GSD.Everytime he was praised,he got his ball on a rope toy.As he was a working dog,this is how my brother(and many handlers)praise for a job well done..:)

He may not of "forced" her,but he did have to roll her.Right?

Here is some good reading.And I so agree with everything that she says.

http://www.dogsensecommunications.com/alpha.html

TwoLostSouls
September 29th, 2008, 01:23 PM
Sorry, but if you attempt to alpha roll a dog who is acting in an aggressive manner - you are going to get bit. You may not get bit the first time - but you are going to get it. A dog that is amped up enough to need that serious a correction is not simply going to "turn off" because you want it to lay on it's side.

Your complete misunderstanding of the exercise doesn't mean it doesn't work. The point of the exercise is to make your dog realize you are in charge, not him.

Every time someone like you claims I'm full of crap, I prove them wrong. Your opinion means little to me. What I do works every time. Sorry, big dogs, little dogs, none scare me.

My dogs bark for all kinds of reasons. I certainly don't require that they live a life of silence. I can tell you that my smaller dog has impecible manners and does whatever I ask of him instantly. I will also tell you that if you EVER try to alpha roll this 8 pound boy, he will remove your finger - unless you manage to put something bigger in line with his mouth. Ite has absolutely NOTHING to do with whether I am his alpha or not - it has to do with having respect for his space and his not liking to be manhandled.

Believe as you wish. People come here asking for help and I tell them what works. You're free to disagree with me, but I'm not afraid of my 8 pound dog, yet you appear afraid of yours, yet I'm wrong. Bring me your 8 pound dog, I'll have him behaving within minutes, without pain, without hurt, without choke nor pinch collars, without treats and he'll be happy to do it.

I really don't understand why people are so hostile towards me. I know what works and I try to describe it here to the best of my abilities. Allowing your dog to dominate you is why we have things like Pit Bull bans and that's the bottom line. Humans have been breeding dogs for hundreds, if not thousands of years to be followers, not leaders nor partners. Your fear of your dog biting you is typical of what goes wrong when you're not in control.

TwoLostSouls
September 29th, 2008, 01:50 PM
Dogs live in the moment...By the time you could accomplish this, the situation would likely be long forgotten. In order to offer any meaningful positive or negative reinforcement, you need to have GOOD timing (like within half a second).... Otherwise the dog will not have a clue what you are up to.

Yes. And?

Maybe I could wait for a slight break in the reacting and then mark and reward or maybe I could reinforce the abscence of full-blown reacting (which is why I said she needed to work her dog BELOW threshold); maybe I could redirect my dog and then get a rewardable behaviour; maybe I could manage the situation.

A lot of maybes, but nothing concrete. Maybes don't cut it when the dog is in attack mode or is agitated.

1. Alpha rollling your dog is based on ENTIRELY flawed research in the 1940s on wolves
2. Dogs are not wolves NOR are we dogs

Umm, dogs were bred from wolves and I never said we were dogs.

3. No wolf would ever FORCE another wolf on its back - that behaviour is offered WILLINGLY by the submissive wolf as APPEASEMENT.
4. The only time you'd see a wolf forcibly roll another, is if it meant to kill - so an alpha roll is far from calming

Submission is the name of the game. Sorry, I've studied to the contrary and even if I hadn't, I don't recognize you as an expert.

5. No TRUE leader needs to alpha roll, its only the lower ranking animals who have to continually demonstrate their place

There is a good National Geographic program about a man - Shaun Ellis - who has spent a few years as a member of a wolf pack. His findings disagree with you.

What I haven't figured out is why people think that they need to rely on brute force to "teach" their dogs anything. Or why they have to attempt to act like dogs to get their message across.

I haven't figured out why some people think its alright to not be in control of their dog.

Nowhere have I said to use "brute force" nor anything close to it. Nowhere have I claimed to have to act like a dog. To communicate with your dog you have to use means it understands. It doesn't understand our language. You can't explain to it, you have to show it with your actions and body language. I have no problem getting dogs to understand what I want from them. No anger, no frustration, no pain, no brutality.

If you'd like to further attempt to insult me, please take it to e-mail as I don't want to offend anyone who is looking for real help nor anyone who is trying to give it.

TwoLostSouls
September 29th, 2008, 01:56 PM
My suggestion - leave your pup at home where it is safe and out of harms way until it has been socialized in an atmosphere where you can give it the attention it needs to teach it how to behave. That is not in a store in a confined space with customers you are giving your attention to and a dog who thinks it's the boss.

:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing:

This has to be the worst piece of advice I've ever seen. Taking your dog out of your life and locking it up alone will only make things worse, not to mention the boredom the dog will encounter and as most dog owners know, a bored dog finds something to amuse itself.

Why have a dog if you're just going to lock it away? How does the dog learn to become social in the store when you have it confined at home?

:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing:

Dog Dancer
September 29th, 2008, 03:04 PM
Seems really simple to me. Have your dog on a leash when you're in the store. Have the leash attached to you and correct the dog when it misbehaves. If the dog isn't running around free it isn't chasing and barking at the other dogs. End of problem here. The dog needs some serious training to be done outside of the store environment to learn more respect for you the owner, but until then keeping her tied to your pants will force her to pay attention to you. She doesn't need to be running all over the place. Quick correction on the leash and lots of praise when she shuts up. No roll necessary.

LavenderRott
September 29th, 2008, 03:37 PM
:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing:

This has to be the worst piece of advice I've ever seen. Taking your dog out of your life and locking it up alone will only make things worse, not to mention the boredom the dog will encounter and as most dog owners know, a bored dog finds something to amuse itself.

Why have a dog if you're just going to lock it away? How does the dog learn to become social in the store when you have it confined at home?

:laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing:

ROFLMAO!!!

Hundreds of thousands of dog owners leave their dogs at home alone while going to work and have perfectly well behaved, well socialized animals.

BTW - domesticated dogs haven't been wild for a couple of hundred years. I doubt that my dogs would have a clue as to what to do in a wolf pack and neither would yours.

14+kitties
September 29th, 2008, 10:37 PM
Wow TwoLostSouls! You seem to have a lot of anger issues. I don't think anyone was telling you you were wrong. Just that the method you are promoting does not suit their teaching methods. Notice I said teaching methods. A lot of people you seem to be putting down for having their own thoughts and ideas are trainers. Some for a very, very long time.

You ask us to email if we want to discuss this further so you didn't get insulted further but then feel absolutely no cumpunction but to systematically rip each one of our thoughts apart. How fair is that?

I guess I have not been fortunate to work in a store/factory/restaurant/etc.. where you are allowed to bring your dog to work with you every day. I am very very glad for you that you obviously do!! That's wonderful! I think more people should take their dogs/cats to work with them. It would sure relieve the stress of a job that demands our attention 100% of the time. Like when we are trying to get a customer an item that the customer wants off the top shelf. Climbing the ladder to get the item leaves us able to watch/react to our dogs every move. Or when the customer has us in an in depth conversation about something that is very important to them. I am sure the customer won't mind if you have to take your attention away from them to correct your dog constantly. Yes, it's a great idea to have your dog at work with you!!

Com'mon now. Let's use some kindness here and get this thread back on track instead of being so nasty because people aren't bending to certain ideals. Everyone is entitled to their opinion. Even those of us unlucky enough not to have our pets with us 24/7.

ec140466
September 29th, 2008, 11:01 PM
I would like to thank everyone for there advice on this issue. It has been resolved by using the praising method. The other day 2 rotweillers came into the store and she did wonderful, she just sat behind the counter and watched them while I helped the customer and I was so pleased with her. :thumbs up

MommaKat
September 29th, 2008, 11:08 PM
That's great ec14 :thumbs up

I would love to see pictures of your pooch :D:cloud9:

Love4himies
September 30th, 2008, 06:50 AM
Glad to hear your dog is doing much better at the store :thumbs up

mona_b
September 30th, 2008, 10:03 AM
I would like to thank everyone for there advice on this issue. It has been resolved by using the praising method. The other day 2 rotweillers came into the store and she did wonderful, she just sat behind the counter and watched them while I helped the customer and I was so pleased with her. :thumbs up



You are doing a great job.Keep it up..:highfive:

Praising makes a HUGE difference....;)

Hundreds of thousands of dog owners leave their dogs at home alone while going to work and have perfectly well behaved, well socialized animals.

SOOOOOO true.........:highfive:

Humans have been breeding dogs for hundreds, if not thousands of years to be followers, "not leaders nor partners".

Explain this before I answer.

LavenderRott
September 30th, 2008, 12:31 PM
Your complete misunderstanding of the exercise doesn't mean it doesn't work. The point of the exercise is to make your dog realize you are in charge, not him.

Every time someone like you claims I'm full of crap, I prove them wrong. Your opinion means little to me. What I do works every time. Sorry, big dogs, little dogs, none scare me.



Believe as you wish. People come here asking for help and I tell them what works. You're free to disagree with me, but I'm not afraid of my 8 pound dog, yet you appear afraid of yours, yet I'm wrong. Bring me your 8 pound dog, I'll have him behaving within minutes, without pain, without hurt, without choke nor pinch collars, without treats and he'll be happy to do it.

I really don't understand why people are so hostile towards me. I know what works and I try to describe it here to the best of my abilities. Allowing your dog to dominate you is why we have things like Pit Bull bans and that's the bottom line. Humans have been breeding dogs for hundreds, if not thousands of years to be followers, not leaders nor partners. Your fear of your dog biting you is typical of what goes wrong when you're not in control.

What in the name of all that is holy makes you think I am afraid of my 8 pound dog!?! He has never worn a choke or pinch collar and has been trained with pain free corrections, plenty of reward and has not once been rolled into submission. Not only does he do what I ask of him instantly - but he does it gladly with anticipation of what comes next. While I am, most certainly, the Alpha in my home - I do not "dominate" my dogs.

And - I have no fear of my dog biting me or anyone who has a real understanding of dog behaviour. But. If YOU think you need to roll him into submission - I can promise you that he absolutely will not tolerate such strong arm tactics.

Honestly - you haven't proven anyone wrong. You are, of course, entitled to your own opinion but most people here have dogs that are well behaved canine citizens and we managed to do it without getting physical with our dogs. This doesn't mean that we don't know what we are doing or what different tools are available for different dogs with different issues. What it does mean is that most of us don't believe that one needs to "dominate" our dogs into "submission" with outdated tactics to show our dogs who the "pack" leader is and to train them to be great family pets.