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Are hand raised kittens friendly?

Tundra_Queen
September 12th, 2008, 07:36 AM
Hi
I just was wondering if u think hand raised kittens are friendly to people than kittens raised by the momma cat?

I am going tonight to pick out my two kittens and wanted to know people opinions on this.

Do hand raised kittens bite less than cat raised kittens........more social with people? etc?

Thank you

Joeyjoejoe
September 12th, 2008, 08:56 AM
Hi
I just was wondering if u think hand raised kittens are friendly to people than kittens raised by the momma cat?

I am going tonight to pick out my two kittens and wanted to know people opinions on this.

Do hand raised kittens bite less than cat raised kittens........more social with people? etc?

Thank you

By hand raised do you mean kittens raised without any involvement from their mother?

Tundra_Queen
September 12th, 2008, 09:04 AM
Yes, I mean no involvement with the momma cat. There was no momma cat when these babies were found.

Love4himies
September 12th, 2008, 09:09 AM
No guarantees, because some personality is genetic, but it has been my experience (14+ will have some good insight too) that yes, they are closer to human beings as they know them as their mommas. This of course depends on the care that they have gotten from the humans too.

As for biting, it depends on the foster family and their rules on raising the kittens. In my house foster kittens are taught from day 1, no biting, no climbing, no exceptions, and I have been 100% successful. They never regarded fingers as play objects, only for petting comfort.

They do learn from their siblings to be gentle when they play, so if they have been together for at least 12 weeks, normally they are well socialized. If you are adopting two siblings (:fingerscr:pray:) that are younger, they will teach each other and you can train them to not bite hands.

Joeyjoejoe
September 12th, 2008, 09:13 AM
They'll be social with humans and if not, they'll come around... They are still young.

However, they won't learn the lessons their mom would normally teach them. You bring up biting. Kittens without a mother will have a much higher likelihood of biting than kittens with a mother (who will bite back to teach them it's not acceptable behavior). But it is correctable.

That's a smart idea getting two instead of one. Love4himmies is right in that the siblings will learn from each other. For example my little guys will bite when they want to play rough, but they learned from each other that it hurts and now only nibble.

Love4himies
September 12th, 2008, 09:21 AM
They'll be social with humans and if not, they'll come around... They are still young.

However, they won't learn the lessons their mom would normally teach them. You bring up biting. Kittens without a mother will have a much higher likelihood of biting than kittens with a mother (who will bite back to teach them it's not acceptable behavior).

I have not found this to be necessarily true, I find that it depends on the foster home care AND siblings being together until they are at least 12 weeks. I have raised the gentliest of kittens from 5 weeks of age without their momma to 5 months with their momma. No difference in their biting.

14+kitties
September 12th, 2008, 09:23 AM
They'll be social with humans and if not, they'll come around... They are still young.

However, they won't learn the lessons their mom would normally teach them. You bring up biting. Kittens without a mother will have a much higher likelihood of biting than kittens with a mother (who will bite back to teach them it's not acceptable behavior).

Very good answer Joeyjoejoe. Mom teaches them that biting hurts. Mom swats when they do something they shouldn't. Mom warns when play gets too rough.

I have had some very young kittens who love being with people and adjust quickly. I have had some that would rather just be by themselves. It really is a mix of genetics and the time they have with momma and humans.

Please don't think just because these kittens have been hand raised that you are going to get kittens that are complete cuddlebums. It doesn't always work that way.

Good luck. And we, of course, will need to see pics asap. ;)

Love4himies
September 12th, 2008, 09:25 AM
Tundra_Queen: My advice is to adopt sibling kittens, teach them the rules from day 1 in your house. In training kittens, there must be 100% consistency, no exceptions, it will only confuse the little sweeties. Training them not to play with hands is just a firm "No", pull away the hand and to distract them a toy. They will get the message ;)

If they climb legs, then I find putting my hand down to about 2 inches above their faces just before they jump with a firm "No" teaches them not to climb your legs.

14+kitties
September 12th, 2008, 09:38 AM
L4H is right too. And she has had tons of experience.
I guess what I meant by saying well said by Joey is they won't learn the lessons their mom would normally teach them. That is right.
BUT, that being said, they do learn and can be taught, what is right and wrong by the people who love them. The biting happens. They need to be taught. If mom isn't there to do it then I hope whoever raised them did.

Joeyjoejoe
September 12th, 2008, 09:41 AM
I have not found this to be necessarily true, I find that it depends on the foster home care AND siblings being together until they are at least 12 weeks. I have raised the gentliest of kittens from 5 weeks of age without their momma to 5 months with their momma. No difference in their biting.

I guess you're right... as long as someone teaches them that biting is wrong, then it's not really a problem.

Tundra_Queen
September 12th, 2008, 12:31 PM
Thank you to everyone for you help and good advice!

I've just never gone and picked out a kitten before as Wilbur found me, I didn't have a choice. LOL

Have a good day!:cat: