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Puppy with crooked leg

StaffyLady
August 30th, 2008, 03:34 PM
We have two puppies left out of 11 in a litter of Am. pitbull terriers. They are 9 weeks old now and we've noticed that one of them has extremely crooked front legs. He also quivers when he stands on them. As far as I know he was born this way. Nothing has happened to him that would have affected his legs.
We need to take them both to our vet for follow up puppy shots, and I'll be querying him about what we can do about this. But I was wondering if anyone had any ideas on what may have caused this and what is usually done to help the problem...if anything. All of the other puppies had straight legs.
He's a sweet smart little pup and I'd hate to think that he might have to be put down due to it.
Any help you can give will be very much appreciated. Thanks, Denise

pitgrrl
August 30th, 2008, 04:49 PM
Have there been any ortho issues in the parents lines?

StaffyLady
August 31st, 2008, 08:25 AM
Not that I know of, the parents of the sire had no problems, I have no idea about the mothers lineage. My daughter purchased her at approximately a year old w/no papers. They were told she has Colby breeding.
Upon watching him yesterday it seems that his knees pop in and out depending on how long he's been out playing and running. It doesn't seem to affect him very much, he plays quite hard with his brother, and runs just as fast as his straight legged brother. The quivering in the front legs makes me wonder.

We've been feeding them Eagle Pack small/med breed puppy food since approximately 5 weeks, and my vet told me to wean them as they were wearing out their mother.

pitgrrl
August 31st, 2008, 12:09 PM
Not that I know of, the parents of the sire had no problems, I have no idea about the mothers lineage. My daughter purchased her at approximately a year old w/no papers. They were told she has Colby breeding.


Ah well, amongst the variety of other issues with breeding dogs of unknown lineage is the crap shoot in regards to health. I hope you'll keep track of the rest of the litter in case health issues come up in the others.

Here are a couple of videos of a dog (pretty young, under a year old) with slipping patellas, might be useful as reference :shrug:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onVOISzIylY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh7w7qkgRlE

StaffyLady
August 31st, 2008, 03:24 PM
Thanks Pitgrrl, I suspect that slipping patella's is what's going on. My vet will probably verify this next week when I get him in to be seen. What a shame, like I said he seemed to be the only pup affected, however, I gave everyone my email address and asked them to keep in touch with me. We sold the pups as pet quality, non registerable dogs. It was not a planned breeding and I feel really badly that he has this issue and others may.
Do you know if there is anything surgical that can be done for him? Have you heard of anyone that has had this problem corrected?
I love our dogs, we have two full grown pits, and one that belongs to my son. They have been wonderful family pets and we've had zero issues with them as far as aggression towards other dogs, and forget about aggressive toward people. These dogs understand the slightest nuance from their pack leaders. I wish more people understood them.
Thanks again for your input. It is much appreciated.

pitgrrl
August 31st, 2008, 04:06 PM
People do get their dog's luxating patellas surgically corrected, but obviously you'd need to have the problem diagnosed and then discuss the options with your vet. The puppy seems frighteningly young to be having such sever problems and this condition wouldn't explain the shaking front legs you mentioned.

Given that these types of problems of most often hereditary, amongst about 8 million other reasons to do so, I hope you'll get your dogs spayed and neutered ASAP and do your best to make sure the whole litter is fixed (I don't suppose you might have fixed them before they left your care or sent them out with a spay/neuter contract by chance?).

Pit Bull Rescue Central (http://www.pbrc.net/fund/ap_neuter.html) offers financial aid for spaying and neutering if cost is an issue for you.

StaffyLady
September 1st, 2008, 08:11 AM
Thanks for the good information Pitgrrl, I will follow up regarding the spaying. But you do not have all of the information and if you would have handled this situation differently then I'd be happy to know how.

Firstly, all of MY dogs HAVE been spayed or neutered, that is my usual practice as I don't feel that adding to the mounting number of pets that get euthanized each year is something I want to participate in.

My son has been told by me and by his veterinarian to neuter his dog...which he refuses to do. It's his dog and his decision. Normally he contains him so that he won't get into trouble. But neither of us has been able to change his mind.

My daughters dog, on the other hand, should have been spayed long ago, however, her moronic partner is not a believer in vet care for dogs and refused to spend the money on the dog. They also had to move to a new place, which does not allow dogs, unfortunately my son visited with his dog during her dogs heat. I do not condone what happened, and because of the move I was the one selected to take care of the bitch and the 11 puppies.
Which was not an easy assignment, let me tell you. But the alternative was to give the bitch and 11 pups to a shelter and that would have made my 8 year old granddaughter pretty upset. I dealt with it in the best manner I felt was possible at the time.

If you know of a vet that spays or neuters 8 week old puppies, then that vet should have his license removed. No, the pups had not been spayed or neutered. I found it difficult to find a suitable contract that would cover these puppies. I had told all the buyers that I'd be glad to take the pups back if they were unhappy or had training issues. They have my phone number and email address to contact me. Besides which, even though you make someone sign a contract, how on earth would you begin to follow up on all the buyers to make sure they had the dogs taken care of??? And how do you enforce it. We were exceptionally lucky that they found good homes. And I'm fairly sure that the type of people we sold them to will be responsible in the long run.

I was hoping for help in identifying what his problem might be, before taking him to my vet. I believe in being as informed as I can be. Thanks for your help, I guess my vet will hopefully figure this out.

pitgrrl
September 1st, 2008, 08:41 AM
Thanks for the good information Pitgrrl, I will follow up regarding the spaying. But you do not have all of the information and if you would have handled this situation differently then I'd be happy to know how.

Firstly, all of MY dogs HAVE been spayed or neutered, that is my usual practice as I don't feel that adding to the mounting number of pets that get euthanized each year is something I want to participate in.

My son has been told by me and by his veterinarian to neuter his dog...which he refuses to do. It's his dog and his decision. Normally he contains him so that he won't get into trouble. But neither of us has been able to change his mind.

My daughters dog, on the other hand, should have been spayed long ago, however, her moronic partner is not a believer in vet care for dogs and refused to spend the money on the dog. They also had to move to a new place, which does not allow dogs, unfortunately my son visited with his dog during her dogs heat. I do not condone what happened, and because of the move I was the one selected to take care of the bitch and the 11 puppies.
Which was not an easy assignment, let me tell you. But the alternative was to give the bitch and 11 pups to a shelter and that would have made my 8 year old granddaughter pretty upset. I dealt with it in the best manner I felt was possible at the time.

I apologize if my previous post came off as judgemental, I'm sure you can understand why, without all the information, one might get a bit frustrated when they read 'litter', 'pit bull', 'unknown background', 'health problem' all in one post. Thank you for trying to make the best of a situation created by the irresponsibility of others, I hope your children have learned something from all this.



If you know of a vet that spays or neuters 8 week old puppies, then that vet should have his license removed. No, the pups had not been spayed or neutered. I found it difficult to find a suitable contract that would cover these puppies. I had told all the buyers that I'd be glad to take the pups back if they were unhappy or had training issues. They have my phone number and email address to contact me. Besides which, even though you make someone sign a contract, how on earth would you begin to follow up on all the buyers to make sure they had the dogs taken care of??? And how do you enforce it. We were exceptionally lucky that they found good homes. And I'm fairly sure that the type of people we sold them to will be responsible in the long run.

Shelters and rescues pretty routinely do pediatric spays and neuters, for the very reason you pointed out, contracts are hard to enforce.

Is it ideal to alter a dog at 8 weeks? In my opinion no, but often necessary to insure that puppies don't go on to produce even more pups and continue the never ending cycle. There are thousands of dogs out there who had a pediatric spay/neuter done and are healthy, happy dogs, so I don't think it's an unreasonable suggestion.

In any case, what's done is done. Perhaps the thing to do now is to provide the owners of the pups with information regarding spaying/neutering, financial assistance and/or free/lowcost spay and neuter programs in your area (which I can help you find if you want) and do your best to encourage them to have it done.

I hope that the pup with the leg problems can find some help. It's really heartbreaking to have such a young puppy suffering already. Please let us know how the vet visit turns out.

StaffyLady
September 2nd, 2008, 05:42 AM
Thanks Pitgrrl,

I really do appreciate your information and I'd be happy to have any information on spaying/neutering you know of. The only resource I know of in our area is the Westbrook Animal Shelter that will help low-income people have pets spayed, my daughter is supposed to be checking on this, but I'll need to remind her since she just gave birth 5.5 wks prematurely and has been spending most of her time at our local hospital with her new son.

I talked about having the mother spayed with my vet, his pricing, now that she's a 3yo that has had a litter is somewhere in the neighborhood of $400.00.
He already gave me a pretty good discount on having all 11 of them innoculated, wormed and exams. I doubt that he will be of much more help price wise for Bella (or me.) We already had 2 dogs of our own over the age of 13, and now with Bella and two pups to take care of we're stretched to the max. I have always put my animals first, they are taken care of before I take care of anything else.

And I do have email for many of the owners or can get in touch with them to pass along information. One is going to the vet today and I talked to the owner yesterday and asked her to have the pups legs in particular checked. I know this person well and she is a responsible person.

I will be calling my vet today and I will let you know how this turns out. I'm hoping that he will be alright. I can't tell you how badly I feel also, he's a very good & smart little boy.

StaffyLady
September 8th, 2008, 01:11 PM
Just thought I'd let everyone know about the outcome for the crooked legged puppy. We call him Buster and he's completely adorable.

My vet checked him over this a.m.(in addition to giving him the rest of his puppy shots) and found there to be no pain involved. He said that the issue could have been caused by some trauma to the leg, but later said that his growth plates seem to be fine and that the other front leg was clearly no straight either. He said he could take xrays, but it would only show all of the growth plates, which he didn't think were compromised. Phew.
(think Bulldog stance).
He told me that we have a very good Orthopedic Vet close by, that might be able to offer assistance with this issue. But that it would require breaking the pups legs and setting them so that they would grow straight, if we didn't like the way he looks (I doubt that I'd have it done just to improve his looks...but then...some people would feel differently I'm sure). And he wasn't completely sure that the pup would ever have arthritic problems later in life due to the way his legs are.
So I called the prospective owners, that had seen him last weekend and wanted him to let them know that had taken place at the vet and that I didn't want to let them take him if they had any concerns whatsoever. She was more than nice and said "well there are bowlegged people that never have a problem" and that they would be by tonight to get him. So at least he's going to a loving family home. Of which I'm extremely glad.

There's the update. Thanks for all of your advice and help.

Denise

kandy
September 8th, 2008, 02:36 PM
I'm glad the vet thinks the pup isn't in any pain. You might caution the buyer that dogs with bone malformations can have an increased risk of rupturing cruciate ligaments. It's good that there is an orthopedic vet nearby - they will be better able to give a correct diagnosis if the pup begins limping.

I have a dog who is severely pigeon toed, both front and back. When she ruptured her ACL, the ortho vet said that because of her bone malformation, the ligament was under abnormal stress from the time she was born and it wouldn't have taken an actual injury for the ligament to fully rupture.

StaffyLady
September 9th, 2008, 03:38 PM
Thanks for the info Kandy. I can entirely sympathize with you regarding the cruciate ligament issues.
My now very old Staffordshire female had one knee operated on for it, fortunately by a great surgeon who did an outstanding job...we were going to do her other hind leg later on...but in the meantime xrays of her hips showed that she was basically bone on bone in her hips.
Another case of a badly bred litter by a backyard breeder. I adore the dog, however, and we do everything we can to make her comfortable and she's made it to the ripe old age of 13 and still keeps a very good disposition.

I did let the new owners know how they could get in contact with the ortho vet and also told them that if they wanted to have more information than I gave them that it would be wise to take the pup well before he turns a year.

Thanks, D

ionan
October 23rd, 2008, 09:46 PM
StaffyLady,

I was wondering if you have some pictures of your puppy with the problem in his legs. I may have a puppy with the same problem so I would like to compare. Although, my vet told me not to worry because my dog is going to walk fine, I'm very concerned.
Thank you.