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Bark Busters

allymack
July 29th, 2008, 07:39 PM
alright i started a thread about this a while ago, but i have finally decided to start saving my pennies ( i thnk its around $300). I dont think he wiukl start it untill the fall or the spring.. ( i dont want to do it in the winter, so i relly hope to get it done in the fall). I dont htink i can get rid of his on leash aggression on my own, so i am going to them. i will keep working on it untill i get him signed up with them, but i really htnk they will help, also they have the lifetime garuntee which seems like a good thing, so i can get them to come back when i need them ( which i am planning on, to help with the door barking and recall).

I'm just wondering if anybody here has had expirence with Bark Busters or know of someone who has. If you could share your expirences..good or bad it would be great! Although i know there are different trainers for each one, and not sure if they use the same methods but it seems like they will be able to help get rid of his aggression.

BlueBreeze
July 29th, 2008, 10:54 PM
Frankly, I've never used them personally, but have read alot of posts on other dog forums and they were not favourable to Bark Busters.

I think their guarantee only qualifies if you keep training the dog the way they said (but I always wonder what if the dog needs a different method).

I don't know how qualified these trainers are. It's alot of money to put out up front. I hired a behaviourist and am quite happy with her knowledge and experience with dogs. She is constantly upgrading by taking courses and going to seminars.

Maybe people have had success, but I know a few trainers have people come to them to fix the problems after they have been to BB.

Lissa
July 30th, 2008, 10:09 AM
IMO Bark Busters is not worth the money... Their methods are based almost completely on negative reinforcement (with some praise thrown in) and of course they are very big on the alpha-dominance theory (ie: dog cannot walk in front of you:laughing:)

While their site says they do not use certain tools (like prongs or sprays) they seem to have left out chokers and the few people that I have spoken to about Bark Busters have said that sprays were ultimately used on their "stubborn" dogs... Their dogs have basic behaviour problems - not sure I'd want a BB trainer's help with aggression if all they can break out is negative reinforcement/noise aversion and then sprays.

If you choose to go with a BB I would do extensive research on the trainer who'd be working with you (I'm talking references and contact information for previous clients - especially those with aggressive dogs). Aggression requires a special trainer or behaviourist - you do not want any run of the mill trainer!
BTW -I can get 8 1-1 sessions with my trainer/behaviourist for $300 or I can take 3 reactive dog classes for that price (and I can contact her anytime for advice as well) - all of which are far more useful IMO than having a "trainer" come to my home and work with my dog... My dog is not reactive inside! While I agree that training starts in the home, if you don't progress beyond that relatively quickly, you won't be forward!

luckypenny
July 30th, 2008, 10:49 AM
Allymack, here are some trainers' websites I have found in Nova Scotia that seem to use only positive reinforcement methods. I think at least one of them has experience with aggressive dogs as well. Hopefully they are located nearby you :fingerscr .

http://www.dogsensecommunications.com/index.html

http://www.gooddogworks.ca/index.htm

http://www.cloverfieldbehaviour.com/index.html

Please extensively interview any trainer you're considering going with. As Lissa recommends, it's always a good idea to ask for references. Don't be shy to follow up on them.

I would avoid any methods that support aversive corrections. I know first-hand that this will exacerbate the problem of a reactive dog. I'm of the opinion that one's goal is to have their dogs want to listen to you, not have to listen to you.

Let us know what you find out, ok?

allymack
July 30th, 2008, 04:40 PM
IMO Bark Busters is not worth the money... Their methods are based almost completely on negative reinforcement (with some praise thrown in) and of course they are very big on the alpha-dominance theory (ie: dog cannot walk in front of you:laughing:)

:owell that part would work out for me, as i dont let enzo walk in front of me, because it is easier for me to control him if i have even half a foot advantage.


If you choose to go with a BB I would do extensive research on the trainer who'd be working with you (I'm talking references and contact information for previous clients - especially those with aggressive dogs). Aggression requires a special trainer or behaviourist - you do not want any run of the mill trainer!
BTW -I can get 8 1-1 sessions with my trainer/behaviourist for $300 or I can take 3 reactive dog classes for that price (and I can contact her anytime for advice as well) - all of which are far more useful IMO than having a "trainer" come to my home and work with my dog... My dog is not reactive inside! While I agree that training starts in the home, if you don't progress beyond that relatively quickly, you won't be forward!

I am definately going to ask them for references, especially ones from people who had leash aggressive dogs, like Enzo.

Allymack, here are some trainers' websites I have found in Nova Scotia that seem to use only positive reinforcement methods. I think at least one of them has experience with aggressive dogs as well. Hopefully they are located nearby you :fingerscr .

http://www.dogsensecommunications.com/index.html

http://www.gooddogworks.ca/index.htm

http://www.cloverfieldbehaviour.com/index.html

Please extensively interview any trainer you're considering going with. As Lissa recommends, it's always a good idea to ask for references. Don't be shy to follow up on them.

I will for sure, i dont want to waste my money on a trainer that is no help and who could possibly make his aggression worse with their "training methods"

I would avoid any methods that support aversive corrections. I know first-hand that this will exacerbate the problem of a reactive dog. I'm of the opinion that one's goal is to have their dogs want to listen to you, not have to listen to you.

thats definately another hting i want, i want him to wantto listen to me, not feel that he has to, that way i know i will have his respect.

Let us know what you find out, ok?

for sure, i will keep you guys updated. And thanks for the websites..i am going to check them out right now. I have had alot of problems finding "growl" classes that are an hour drive away..with the price of gas and everything going up, i mean an hour drive each week for 6-8 weeks..it really piles up..:o

ashtoreth
July 30th, 2008, 04:42 PM
IMO Bark Busters is not worth the money... Their methods are based almost completely on negative reinforcement (with some praise thrown in) and of course they are very big on the alpha-dominance theory (ie: dog cannot walk in front of you:laughing:)



As silly as it sounds, I heard that the dog not walking in front of you was actually a good idea. But It was only hearsay i heard from people. do you have more information to how this is bad/funny matter? im seriously curious

allymack
July 30th, 2008, 05:31 PM
Thhe first and last website seem like they could help me the most, i have emailed both. I described my situation to them to see if they htink they could help. They seem like really great trainers, but again, i will ask for refences, just to make sure. Thnkas LP!

luckypenny
July 30th, 2008, 07:26 PM
Thhe first and last website seem like they could help me the most, i have emailed both. I described my situation to them to see if they htink they could help. They seem like really great trainers, but again, i will ask for refences, just to make sure. Thnkas LP!

If I had to judge from the websites alone (never a good idea :D), I like the fact that the owner of the last one not only has so many years experience, but the fact that she seems to keep right up-to-date on more 'modern' methods of training. And I'm always impressed when I see anyone associated with Karen Pryor :thumbs up.

As silly as it sounds, I heard that the dog not walking in front of you was actually a good idea. But It was only hearsay i heard from people. do you have more information to how this is bad/funny matter? im seriously curious

I prefer to have my dogs walk right next to me (on a loose leash) for much of the same reason that Allymack prefers it. However, we have designated areas (public grassy areas, long lengths of cedar hedges, etc) where I give them permission to "go smell." They understand the command/reward perfectly well and know that when we come to the end of whatever stretch of property, they fall back into a relaxed heal on their own.

I feel that having a dog walk at a heal for long periods of time, especially when they are just getting the hang of it, is somewhat unfair. It takes a lot of concentration and focus for some dogs to accomplish this so I like to reward them with frequent "go smells."

allymack
July 30th, 2008, 07:54 PM
If I had to judge from the websites alone (never a good idea :D), I like the fact that the owner of the last one not only has so many years experience, but the fact that she seems to keep right up-to-date on more 'modern' methods of training. And I'm always impressed when I see anyone associated with Karen Pryor :thumbs up.

Agreed, i love Karen Pryor! and also i agree thats its not a good idea to go on the website alone, i am going to ask for refences first of all and i want to talk to her on the phone about her methods.



I prefer to have my dogs walk right next to me (on a loose leash) for much of the same reason that Allymack prefers it. However, we have designated areas (public grassy areas, long lengths of cedar hedges, etc) where I give them permission to "go smell." They understand the command/reward perfectly well and know that when we come to the end of whatever stretch of property, they fall back into a relaxed heal on their own.
I too have a command for my dog to go off and sniff ( mines loose) with that he knows he can wander anywheres aorund me and sniff but no pulling or lagging, and he will easily fall back to my side most of the time, maybe a reminder..if needed.
I feel that having a dog walk at a heal for long periods of time, especially when they are just getting the hang of it, is somewhat unfair. It takes a lot of concentration and focus for some dogs to accomplish this so I like to reward them with frequent "go smells."

Dogs learning to heal shouldnt do so for more then a minute if they are just learning, or maybe evern less. As LP said it does take alot of concentration so you have to build it up.

I feel with ym dog walking beside me it is more respect ful then walking all around my which could also be dangerous for me, since he might respond quite strongly if he sees something that cathces his eye.