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Brand new newbie with two kitties!

Bellah
July 5th, 2008, 03:01 PM
Hi. I want to introduce myself and my two cats. They are both six year old spayed females - Sally and Rosie. :cat: I've had wonderful dogs, horses, turtles, and a guinea pig at various times, but I've always had kitties around. Sally is a tortoiseshell and has a loud mouth but is very gentle and even plays witn our hands with no claws out. Rosie is a fat brown tabby and is staying fat even on weight control cat food. She always stands her ground and will swat anyone who plays too roughly with her. Looking forward to lots of fun on the forum.

sugarcatmom
July 5th, 2008, 05:40 PM
Hi. I want to introduce myself and my two cats. They are both six year old spayed females - Sally and Rosie.

Welcome to you and Sally and Rosie! We're gonna want pics, and lots of 'em, as soon as you're able.


Rosie is a fat brown tabby and is staying fat even on weight control cat food.

Ah-ha! Well that's the problem right there. Weight control cat food is just about the worst thing to feed a cat. I assume this is dry food we're talking about, but either way, do both your kitties a huge favour and find them a good quality, low-carb (preferably grain-free) wet food. It's the high carbohydrate content in dry food (necessary to create the kibble shape) that makes cats fat in the first place. "Diet" or "light" kibble, in an attempt to lower fat intake with the misguided notion that it's fat that makes cats fat, has ridiculous amounts of carbs (up to 50%, when cats need less than 5%). Not only is diet kibble responsible for most of the rampant obesity in today's felines, it can also result in diabetes, bladder/urinary tract problems, inflammatory bowel disease, kidney insufficiency, and dental disease. Read this link (by feline vet Dr. Lisa Pierson) for more on feline nutrition: http://www.catinfo.org/ and this one on the relationship between dry food and obesity: http://www.catinfo.org/feline_obesity.htm

Sorry to hit you with a lecture right off the bat, but this is a big hot button topic for me, having had an obese cat die of inflammatory bowel disease and another come down with diabetes after feeding them Science Diet Light for most of their lives.

14+kitties
July 5th, 2008, 05:43 PM
Welcome Bellah! This is a great place for meeting friends and finding/giving info. As you can see our kitty health guru sugarcatmom has already welcomed you with excellent advice!
Pictures when you are able are required. We love them here!

Bellah
July 5th, 2008, 07:10 PM
Sugarcatmom, I'm so sorry you lost a kitty and had another develop diabetes. I will read the links and make a plan to change their diets. In the past, I had always fed my cats half wet food and half dry food, and my last kitty had so much trouble with her teeth (abscesses, frequent cleanings needed) that after she was gone and I got these two young ones I was SURE I was going to feed these two 100% dry food for the crunchiness factor. But the carbs couldn't be good for the teeth, either!

Thank you both for the welcome! I will attach pictures of Sally and Rosie as soon as I am allowed. This forum is great!

sugarcatmom
July 5th, 2008, 07:46 PM
my last kitty had so much trouble with her teeth (abscesses, frequent cleanings needed) that after she was gone and I got these two young ones I was SURE I was going to feed these two 100% dry food for the crunchiness factor.

Ya, the whole concept that dry food is better for teeth turns out not to be entirely accurate, although pet food companies aren't about to start spreading the word. They make way too much money from dry, where the profit margins are huge. Here I go with more links on the subject;):
http://home.ivillage.com/pets/cats/0,,p8ds,00.html
http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=doesdryfoodcleantheteeth
http://maxshouse.com/feline_nutrition.htm

Teeth

As is typical of carnivores, the teeth of the cat are appropriately
modified for grasping, puncturing, and tearing (cutting), rather
than for true mastication. With the exception of "crunching" dry
food, cats do little, if any, actual chewing. The hinging of the
lower jaw can only be moved up and down and possesses no
ability for a lateral chewing motion.

The cat has no first premolars and no lower (inferior) first or second
premolars; the molars consist of a single upper and lower tooth on
each side. When the mouth is closed, the upper sectorial tooth (P4)
slides across the vestibular surface of the lower sectorial tooth (Ml),
producing an effective scissor-like cutting action, rather than a
chewing action. Thus the dental benefits of feeding dry food are
grossly overrated. The arrangement and spacing of the cat's teeth
will more likely trap small, slaiva-moistened pieces of dry food.
Carbohydrate based dry cat foods also leaves a starchy coating
which promotes plaque. Nothing replaces professional dental care.