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FLUTD question

yoj6179
June 30th, 2008, 09:28 PM
Hi friends,

My name is Joy, and I'm new here. I have read through loads of info before deciding to write this. I am looking for any personal experience or knowledge that may help me. I have a 1 year old cat named Scooter. I took him Saturday (2 days ago) to the vet because he urinated on my carpet and I saw blood. Well, the Dr. put him on fluids and medicam for pain and educated me about FLUTD but couldn't seem to give me any helpful tips on the issue I am having. (I had to use this vet because it was the only one open, and I'm not really impressed!)He seems to be doing great and urinating no problem. Well, he will only go now in his box if i go in with him. He prefers to scratch around the house and find a place. I know this is part of having the FLUTD but does this get better with time? It seems he just loves going around he house now! I am stressed over the top and any info would be greatly appreciated.

Joy

Stacer
June 30th, 2008, 09:44 PM
My Angus has suffered through FLUTD, I can comiserate. Perhaps when the antibiotics (is medicam an antibiotic?) really start to do their job he'll be more inclined to urinate in the litterbox. The reason cats go outside the box when they have FLUTD is that they associate the pain they're having while urinating with the litterbox, so they go elsewhere hoping to avoid the pain.

You could try using a litter with cat attractant in it to persuade him to use it again without your prodding. Angus would urinate on our dirty clothes, so we would make sure to be extra careful with leaving clothes lying around so that he wouldn't have his preferred "alternate litterbox". It didn't take long after he started the antibiotics to head back to the box to do his thing. Hopefully Scooter will realize that when he goes to the litterbox there's no more pain so it's safe to go there again.

I guess the next question would be, what are you feeding him? What you feed can directly impact his urinary health, especially for neutered male cats. Preferably an all canned (wet) diet for our male feline friends will help to prevent a reoccurance.

yoj6179
June 30th, 2008, 11:16 PM
Thank you so much for that helpful information. I am going to call the vet tomorrow because they didn't seem o think antibiotics would help, that it was just inflammation. The medcam is for the pain and inflammation. They are also putting him on an all wet diet. (I hate that because it really is bad on the teeth and gums, but helpful on the bladder.) Is there a particular food that was recommended for your kitty?

sugarcatmom
June 30th, 2008, 11:27 PM
Sorry to hear about Scooter's urinary issues. Unfortunately, it's quite a common occurrence for male cats. Like Stacer said, the best thing you can do would be to feed wet food exclusively, if you aren't already. A good low-carb (preferably grain-free) canned is fine, staying away from fish flavours. There's more info on feline nutrition here: http://www.catinfo.org/

To further what Stacer said about Scooter associating the litter box with pain, perhaps it would help to provide another box in a different location to see if that helps. Using Dr. Elsey's Cat Attract (http://www.preciouscat.com/) litter or litter additive is also a great idea. And make sure you thoroughly clean any areas where he does urinate with an enzymatic cleaner (like Nature's Miracle) to eliminate any odor which might keep him going back to those same spots.

I hope Scooter is better soon!

Stacer
June 30th, 2008, 11:35 PM
Like Sugarcatmom said, a grainfree canned would be best. Despite what your vet may tell you, the prescription canned that they'll try to sell you is not the best nutritionally for your kitty.

I like the brand Wellness which is available in most petfood supply stores. But there are many grainfree options out there, EVO is another one. I also like to add water to Angus' wetfood to give him some extra moisture.

To take it further, I bought some pH strips at a people health food store and test his urinary pH monthly (it's not as accurate as the vet's testing but it is good for what i need it for) to make sure his pH is not too much out of whack. I also give him some cranberry supplement to keep his urinary pH hovering just below neutral.

yoj6179
June 30th, 2008, 11:38 PM
You guys are great! I didn't think about putting a different litter box in a new location. I have been cleaning with a good enzyme cleaner but it's so easy for him to find a new spot! ha! Thanks again.

sugarcatmom
June 30th, 2008, 11:41 PM
Thank you so much for that helpful information. I am going to call the vet tomorrow because they didn't seem o think antibiotics would help, that it was just inflammation. The medcam is for the pain and inflammation.

Actually, most urinary tract problems in cats are sterile and unless they sent the urine off for a culture and sensitivity to figure out what, if any, bacteria are present, it's better not to just indiscriminantly prescribe antibiotics.

They are also putting him on an all wet diet. (I hate that because it really is bad on the teeth and gums, but helpful on the bladder.)

That's an old myth that dry food is better for teeth. Lots to read here on the subject:
Does Dry Food Clean Teeth? (http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=doesdryfoodcleantheteeth)
The Relation Between Dental Disease and Canned Food (http://home.ivillage.com/pets/cats/0,,p8ds,00.html)

Is there a particular food that was recommended for your kitty?

The best food for a cat with FLUTD is one that is also ideal for all cats: quality meat-based protein with little to no grains and lots of moisture. The sort of diet they've evolved eating, not this over-processed, high-carb cereal crap that we've been feeding them instead. Some good brands to look for are Wellness, Innova Evo 95% meat, Nature's Variety Instinct, By Nature Organics. Even something like Fancy Feast (gluten-free varieties only) are better than any kibble.

Some things you can add to the wet food to sooth the lining of the bladder would be Cosequin (from the vet) or corn silk or marshmallow root (from a health food store). If you need more info on those, let me know.

yoj6179
July 2nd, 2008, 12:11 AM
This is all such great info. Thank you for the direct links to the articles about the wet vs dry food issues. You all were dead on when you said that the wet food was a myth because I talked to the vet today and she explained that in detail to me. Thanks again ladies!

Ps: I love the adding natural herbs like marshmallow root. Have these herbs proven effective for felines?

Joy

sugarcatmom
July 2nd, 2008, 05:50 PM
Ps: I love the adding natural herbs like marshmallow root. Have these herbs proven effective for felines?


While I doubt there have been any studies (since the Pfizers of the world can't make money off them), there is anecdotal evidence that the herbs can help. In fact some companies add corn silk to their pet food and tout it as being good for urinary tract health, although I suspect the amounts are rather negligible. If you'd like to try some marshmallow root, the typical dose would be 100mg per day (can be mixed with food) during trouble, and 25-50mg per day for maintanence.

yoj6179
July 2nd, 2008, 06:55 PM
Great! I am going to try the marsmellow root! :thumbs up