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Neoplasene Therapy

yoli
June 30th, 2008, 02:04 AM
Hello, just joined the Forum and would like to know if there is anyone out there who has used this form of bloodroot to help other kitties out there with cancer.
I have a beloved senior cat that was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma.
My vet is open minded enough to allow me to try it beause the tumor is in an inoperable area of her inner right ear.
I'm concerned with its affects with anorexia and possible neurological side effects. Also would love to know anyone who has gone through this "debulking process" of tumors that are slowly dissolving.
Thanks~!

yoli

rainbow
June 30th, 2008, 02:26 AM
Welcome to pets.ca yoli and sorry to hear about your cat. :sad:

Neoplasene has been discussed several times here.....I'll see if I can find the threads for you. :)

rainbow
June 30th, 2008, 02:29 AM
Here is what I found....

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=48556&highlight=neoplasene

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=40993&highlight=neoplasene

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=39807&highlight=neoplasene

CyberKitten
June 30th, 2008, 05:46 PM
Hmm, I am loathe to comment on this as an oncologist. I fear it gives people false hope. I know it has supposedly worked with a few pets and while that ia wonderful for those animals, there are no scientific (as in what I consider credible studies) on it. If it worked, I'd be so thrilled!!! I'd shout it from the rooftops. I think it may be psychological - the owner pf the dog (For some reason, homeopathic vets use it more with dogs.

I actually talked to its founder (It only works with cats and dogs) and he cautioned me that he too is not satisfied with everything it does. For example, it can eat away at a tumour but the neoplasm that caused the cancer is not so simple. The big problem is there mayu not be enough healthy tissue left for a good and solid recovery. There is more to curing cancer than medications!!!!

One has to recall that cancer is many different illnesses and not all of them have tumours. They all have neoplasms of course BUT one can excise the cancer and still have it occur again months later after it has metricized. I think it might depend on when the cancer was found, what kind of cancer, whether other organs are affected -esp the digestive system since this herb is hard on that area and needs to be taken on a full stomach.

Most cancers do not merely involve tumours and in fact, there is a continuous process by which healthy normal tissue is invaded with diseased
tissue that escapes notice. This neoplastic tissue may progress to become
more and more diseased and aggressive. This herb does not solve this problem - which affects the maj of cancers at all. It would be utterly useless in melanoma for example.

Also, it is an emetic- ie, it induces vomiting so the cat or dog would need something for nausea concurrently! Some cats respond well to cocculine which has no effects like gravol or other meds. But you WILL need other meds or they will have to be given it orally with food.

Most oncolgists think it is bunk - but since I love my cats, I would like to see some significant research done with it in the event my cats developed cancer.
It is also very expensive with no guarantees, fewer actually than the traditional therapies.

There is one supplement I have heard much about - oncoplex, a supplement some oncologists given human cancer patients. Oncoplex has a proven track record in assisting human cancer patients so it does also work on cats and dogs. It is used at Harvard and at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center - one of the best in NYC. I am not ready to experiment with it yet though!

That said, I would never depend on this alone and you should see your vet as well as an ontological vet!!! Do not depend on just what is said here but get many opinions - medical and otherwise before deciding what to do. Stick to the traditional protocols but ask around to see if anything else might be added. I personally would not use it just yet - it does actually have a lot of side effects (contrary to popular belief, anything that is chemically formulated to make an animal vomit is not the best solution!) and while it may not affect the healthy tissue, often there is not enough healthy tissue for it to do so, sigh!

Good luck!! :goodvibes:

rainbow
June 30th, 2008, 06:06 PM
Very informative post, CK :thumbs up

Frenchy
June 30th, 2008, 06:40 PM
Very informative post, CK :thumbs up

I thank you too CK. I made some research on it when Sam was diagnose. I wasn't happy with the responses .... and reading your post , I totally agree with everything.

The people that have been saying their using it on their pets , here in the neoplasene threads , are not regular members and never came back to post updates or post pictures when asked too. That made me very suspicious. :shrug: and that is why I was staying out of it.

barkamama
January 28th, 2011, 10:42 AM
Hi Yoli,

I have no experience with cats, but I can tell you that I definitely believe in this Neoplasene! My mom's 3 year old great dane developed a giant oral fibrosarcoma in her upper jaw. We saw it because it protruded from the roof of her mouth and was ulcerated. It originally looked kind of like cauliflower, but got bigger and had a lot of fluid in it too. The first vet removed the visible tumor and when he found out what it was, referred us to a veterinary oncology treatment center because this type of cancer has deep tentacle-like roots that go into the bone.

We got really bad news there. They have a testimonial book with tearful thank yous to the doctors for "giving them more time" with their pets, but not one cure! We were very scared! We went to one holistic vet in Nashville and he was an absolute quack, but we never stopped looking at natural options. My Mom decided to go through with the radical surgery to remove the remaining cancer. That cost around $6500 or so and they said they thought they got clean margins. We decided not to do radiation at the time because it was so expensive (around $3500-5000 extra) and we had to send her away for a month. They said she would have to be put to sleep every day for treatment, and the results would also not be curative...maybe only to give us a few more months.

In the meantime we tried budwig, essiac, etc and obviously nothing stopped it. 3 months later we had a followup CT scan and our worst fears were confirmed. The cancer had come back and was (in their words) "eating the bone." Again they suggested radiation, which we didn't want to do, and after probing about chemo options they mentioned trying Palladium. We researched this and found no reason we should try it. There were no cases online we could read about...but it seemed I found one that said it made fibrosarcoma grow faster. We had been looking at Neoplasene for a while and finally called Buck Mountain Botanicals to discuss her case with them. We were left with no option but to try it, and they seemed like they had high hopes for her. We had to go through our local vet because the Oncology center refused to discuss Neoplasene. They thought it would be "dangerous" for her to be on it. Our local vet agreed to help...probably the sympathy factor :) but it didn't matter to us!

3 months later, our girl has lost a lot of weight, she's fatigued, she has some bleeding in her mouth and she's throwing up a lot. We took her to the local vet and her red blood cells are very low. Her blood calcium is very normal which is inconsistent with late stage cancer. Dr. Fox at Buck Mtn. said we had to be doing something wrong with the way we were giving it to her and they suggested we go over every detail again and again and have her local vet call him to discuss it. The local vet sent her to the oncologist for another CT scan. We were so scared. The vet was so pleased to report that the cancer didn't show up at all on her scan this time! Official results are still pending, but we are so excited about what we've heard so far. He's sent it off to some experts to evaluate all 3 CT scans from the first preop scan to yesterday's.

I hope you follow through with checking out the Neoplasene. I'm not sure how it works against cancers other than fibrosarcomas, but we cannot be more pleased and really want to tell everyone about it. We will post more after the final analysis of the tests are complete.

God Bless you and your sweet angel!

luckypenny
January 28th, 2011, 03:18 PM
I'm glad your mother's dog seems to be on the road to recovery, barkamama. I have yet to speak to a vet who has heard of Neoplasene, let alone apply it to treat fibrosarcomas :shrug:. Can you pm me the name of your mother's dog's vet? Maybe he/she would like to share a first hand experience with this treatment.

dbg10
February 3rd, 2011, 02:44 PM
My dog has hemangiosarcoma (cancer of the spleen) and I have just been reading these threads and parts of the buck mountain botanicals site about neoplascene to learn if this treatment might be useful for him. I noticed that most of the people who have used this treatment and who found vets familiar with the treatment are in the US. Maybe it is unknown here in Canada and that is why our vets haven't heard of it.

I am a retired RN and this substance reminds me of a treatment we used on severe bed sores to debride the sore and get rid of the infected and dead (necrotic) tissue. The products contain proteolytic enzymes from natural sources and they work well to clean up the pressure sore so that healthy tissue can then heal. However, when they are applied, they are monitored carefully and frequently to prevent them destroying healthy tissue. The process described by some of the visitors to pets.ca is similar to what happens during the sloughing process in humans with decubitus ulcers. I know the treatment is painful because there are live nerves in the healthy tissue around a bed sore. Not all tumours have a nerve supply but they do have a blood supply and there are nerves in the healthy tissue around a tumour that I think will probably cause the animal some pain when used on the tumour. I can't imagine using anything like these proteolytic enzymes internally by sprinkling it on their food or injecting it into tumour cells and not an open sore where you could see the edges of the tumour, because you would have no idea if it was eating/dissolving and sloughing off normal healthy tissue once it had sloughed the tumour cells. They say that neoplascene is an antimicrobial agent as some antibiotics are. However there are also pesticides that are antimicrobials, so it is hard to tell what neoplascene is with the wide definition of 'antimicrobial'. Just my 2 :2cents:

As you have probably gathered I decided it is not a treatment I would use for my dog. I am happy to hear of the success stories with Neoplascene maybe they have a product that eventually will treat human cancer when it is refined. :)