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Pyometra, My story.

Ceilsy
June 3rd, 2008, 09:44 AM
First, I would like to point out that I am ashamed as a pet owner to never know about Pyometra, a disease meaning "Pus in the uterus" found in UN-fixed females.

My 6 year old German Sheppard all of a sudden last week stopped eating, and drinking a ton of water, also peeing a ton!! I was very scared, I called the vet an made an appointment for Saturday. Friday night, things took a change for the worse, discharge of puss was coming out of her vagina, her eyes were BLOODSHOT like you couldn't believe, now, I was terrified. My vet said forget about coming here, goto the emergency hospital ASAP!

We arrived at the hospital at 7pm on Friday evening (when they opened) a quick diagnosis, they told me she had Pyometra. She went into surgery with in 2 hours. She stayed in the hospital until Monday morning, when she was transfered to my vet for the day. We picked her up last night, and she seems to be in good spirits, but still in a bit of pain as expected. She is still drinking alot of water, but the vet said thats fine now, since she wasnt drinking much with them cause she was scared (first time away from us) and that for a change, drinking alot now is a good thing, when normally its a horrible thing.

Although the costs have now reached over $4100, We are so thankful to have our baby back. I am on a fixed income, being a single Dad. I thank God that my Vet didnt care about money, and said we will work something out after they handle the emergency. I was able to pay $1000 cash, and have worked out a $300/month payment, with after interest will take exactly 1 year to pay off. PLEASE, DONT worry about money, if your dog is sick, get help ASAP!

The Hospital told me, If I had waited that 1 day, my dog would have had a less than 20% chance of survival. Now, that 24 hours, have given her a 90% chance. I am so thankful for everything they have done.
Xena is sleeping right now and all is great :thumbs up

katherine93
June 3rd, 2008, 09:47 AM
First of all, welcome to pets.ca! You will meet alot of great people here!

Im so sorry about your doggy having to go through all of that, but also very happy that she made it through it! :goodvibes: that she will continue gettng better!

Frenchy
June 3rd, 2008, 11:22 AM
The Hospital told me, If I had waited that 1 day, my dog would have had a less than 20% chance of survival.

Exactly why pyometra is so dangerous. When you do find something is wrong , puss is coming out because the uterus is now full of it. Please spread the word around you , for everyone to get their female spayed.

I'm happy you had the chance to save your dog , it's not always the case. :sad:

Chris21711
June 3rd, 2008, 11:28 AM
A couple of months ago I managed to get 2 outdoor cats from a local farm into the spca they had room before the deluge of kittens, the mother cat had pyrometra and would have died had she not got to the shelter. Kissy her name is now up for adoption. :)

Ceilsy
June 3rd, 2008, 06:52 PM
Exactly why pyometra is so dangerous. When you do find something is wrong , puss is coming out because the uterus is now full of it. Please spread the word around you , for everyone to get their female spayed.

I'm happy you had the chance to save your dog , it's not always the case. :sad:

I am on the crusade!
I am shocked to learn how common it is, yet I was NEVER informed of it. (Main reason we had a vet change) But as I said, Im on the crusade now, Ive already told 5 female dog owners my story, and will tell them all when Xena is well enough to go to her favorite dog park.

She is doing great, Just WOLFED down a big can of wet food, so thats good.
Thank you everyone, Ill be here on these forums for a long time to come!!
:grouphug::grouphug:

Dr Lee
June 3rd, 2008, 07:42 PM
I am on the crusade!

I am very glad to hear that your baby is safe. I am also happy about your crusade. :thumbs upI do this surgery all too often. Some additional facts to help you on your crusade! Dogs get breast cancer (adenocarcinoma) more commonly than humans. Before a dog's first heat (typically at 6 months of age but can range depending upon breed), the risk of breast cancer is 0.5% After the first heat it jumps to 8% and after the second heat jumps to 26%. So early spays can not only prevent pyometra (although stump pyometra is still possible) it keeps breast cancer risks down to 1 out of 200 instead of more than 1 out of 4!

FYI there is a podcast coming up on early spay and neuter surgery.

Again - I am happy that your puppy is safe. Good job :highfive:and welcome to pets.ca!:grouphug:

satchelp
June 3rd, 2008, 10:29 PM
Dr Lee,

While pyometra is definitely a concern and has a high incidence, with all respect, this risk percentages that you have presented for mammary cancer are actually relative risks, not absolute risks as stated. The figures from this study are almost always misrepresented as absolute risks and therefore extremely inflated. The risk of an intact female having a malignant breast tumour is much less than 8 percent after the first heat and 26% after the second heat.

Please refer to the following study:

DORN, C.R.; TAYLOR, D.O.N.; FRYE, F.L.; HIBBARD, H.H. (1968): Survey of animal neoplasms in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California: I. Methodology and description of cases.J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 40: 295-305)

Basically, among 100 of females that actually develop mammary cancer , 0,5% would still have got it even though they were spayed. 8% of these 100 would have gotten mammary cancer if they were spayed between first and second heat; 26% would still have gotten it if they were spayed between the second and third heat. This is relative risk, not absolute risk, and these figures are widely misinterpreted all the time.

The following study also deals with this same issue:

Stolla, R. (2002). Spaying before or after first heat? Pros and cons. Tierarztliche Praxis 30(5): 333-338. ISSN: 1434-1239.

NAL Call Number: SF603.V433

Descriptors: adverse effects, age, biological development, bitches, dermatitis, incidence, mammary gland neoplasms, neoplasms, estrus, ovariectomy, puberty, urinary incontinence

Dr Lee
June 4th, 2008, 12:55 AM
This is relative risk, not absolute risk, and these figures are widely misinterpreted all the time.

Satchelp,

Thanks for the clarification. You are right the veterinary lectures do present them as absolutes. For example here is an excerpt out of a lecture from San Jose 2003 by Ravinder S. Dhaliwal, DVM, MS, DACVIM, DABVP :
"Dogs spayed before the first estrus, between first and second estrus and after second estrus have occurrences of 0.05%, 8.0% and 26% respectively. The same study also showed that the intact female dogs over two years of age have a seven fold increase in risk of developing mammary gland tumors compared to females neutered prior to six months of age. (Schneider)":shrug:

Perhaps because whether absolute or relative, spaying your pet at a younger age not only has health benefits for the individual but also helps address the crisis of pet overpopulation.

Here is 2007 lecture excerpt from Diagnosis and Management of Dogs with Mammary Tumors ACVIM 2007 Conference with speaker: Antony S. Moore, BVSc, MVSc, DACVIM(O) Location: Wauchope, NSW, Australia

The incidence of mammary tumors is higher in dogs than any other domesticated animal and is three times the incidence in humans. Approximately half of the tumors are malignant, and half of these have metastasized by the time they are initially diagnosed. Sex hormones certainly play a role in development of mammary tumors in the bitch. Intact females have a seven-fold increased risk of developing mammary cancer compared to neutered females. The age at which ovariohysterectomy takes place is directly proportional to the risk of developing mammary cancer. Data clearly indicate the preventive role of ovariectomy prior to the second estrus. Interestingly, when only the dogs that had 2 or more estrus cycles before spaying are considered, there is still a benefit to earlier spaying. If they were spayed before 2.5years of age, then the risk was 6% of those dogs not spayed at all; (that approximates to the 8% quoted for 1 estrus cycle). If they were older than 2.5 years, the risk was 40% of unspayed dogs, but that difference was not significant. Essentially the greatest reduction in risk comes if you spay before the first heat, but then as long as you spay before 2.5 years, the risk is very low.1
1. Schneider R, Dorn CR, Taylor DO. Factors influencing canine mammary cancer development and postsurgical survival. J Natl Cancer Inst 1969; 43:1249-1261.


Thank you for the clarification though. It is always best to be accurate. :)Regardless, spaying before the first heat leads to the maximum reduction of mammary tumor risk. :pawprint:

Love4himies
June 4th, 2008, 06:33 AM
Thank you for sharing your story, Ceilsy.