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I feel like a human popsicle!!!

Jacinthe
May 30th, 2008, 12:25 PM
My little Bruiser love to show us affection but he canot stop licking. I don't mind when he gives me a little lick on the nose once and a while or licks the water off my toes when I get out of the shower and stuff like that but he is always in my face, climbing on me trying to lick. I try to get him to sit or lay down or something but he is on a licking mission. He does that with his pillow at night too. He will lick it until it is soaked and he falls asleep. Does he do it because he is bored? He doesn't lick himself that much, just the usual cleaning but everything around him turns into a tasty treat. How do I get him to stop???

Love4himies
May 30th, 2008, 12:32 PM
He just loves you to bits and is letting you know :lovestruck:

Winston
May 30th, 2008, 12:33 PM
Try to google excessive licking in dogs! lots of info...Good luck with your boy!

Cindy

sugarcatmom
May 30th, 2008, 01:11 PM
Sounds like a bit of OCD behaviour. You might want to read this for some info on how to handle it:
http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&C=117&A=969&S=1
http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&C=117&A=2180&S=1

gaerwen
June 2nd, 2008, 06:38 AM
My Boston licks alot too, I actually will take her off my lap now when she starts and ignore her for a few minutes and invite her back up. I keep saying "no licks" ...when she stops, even for a second I say "good girl" and pet her and give her some love... someone in my class suggested its a calming signal, that she is feeling insecure so she licks. She is doing it less, and we will do our own calming signals back, yawning, looking away, turning away etc, and it seems to work.
Yours sounds a little more fixated though... good luck!

gaerwen
June 2nd, 2008, 06:39 AM
lol, ps, only use the yawning as a calming signal when she cannot reach your mouth with her tongue...lol I have had my teeth licked a number of times! Haha..

anna14
June 2nd, 2008, 05:44 PM
This behavior was probably majorly reinforced as a puppy (we do LOVE a puppy who gives us kisses) and because you don't mind the licking ALL the time, the dog will continue to do it. Unfortunately, dogs do generalize and don't know that you like being licked only sometimes or only in certain spots! ;-)

It could be a medical condition as well, so check with your VET to see all is well, excessive licking could be they are dehyrdrated or lacking something.

Good luck!

katherine93
June 2nd, 2008, 06:01 PM
how old is the dog.. Puppies have a natural instinct to lick your face to get you to throw up. They do this because if mommy dog comes back with a stomach full of meat, they sense it and want it, by licking the moms face, their breath makes her want to throw up therefore, they now have a nice snack. And they tend to do it with humans too.

Jacinthe
June 3rd, 2008, 07:21 AM
Bruiser is a year and 5 months. He was already 4 months when we got him. I will agree with gaerwin, it does look more like he is looking for reasurance. He hates being left alone, actually he doesn't stay alone. So when he sees us he gets very excited. The vet said he had alot of anxiety. He suggests getting him fixed or giving him some kind of anxiety pills until he learns to calm down. I don't know if I feel comfortable with the pills. I think there must be another way of dealing with the problem. I think Bruiser has some psychological issues we need to resolve. Bring on the dog whisperer....lol

Dingo
June 3rd, 2008, 12:35 PM
The episode of At The End of My Leash that aired yesterday had a dog that licked excessively. He first recommended testing it for diabetes, which it didn't have, and then had them provide about 4 times as much exercise as it had been getting.

Licking can be an obsessive behaviour. Before putting him on antidepressants I'd suggest following the above example: get him tested so you know it's not a medical problem, and if you get the all clear start by dramatically increasing the amount of exercise and training he's getting.

gaerwen
June 4th, 2008, 09:46 AM
I hope you dont go with the pills..You could get "5 flower formula" or "rescue remedy" available at natural food/vitamin stores. Its a herbal thing you drop into their water. It helps my friends dogs.
Our boston was a puppy miller, (we think),
she was afraid of everything, would flip over and pee if you even looked at her! She peed in her kennel, had separation anxiety, was terrified of teenage boys and mature dark haired women. Oh, and black garbage bags. We all learned how loud we were as a family! We are much quieter now!
We ignored her whenever she got neurotic. If I called her and she crawled (as opposed to walking) to me Id walk away from her, go sit down on the floor, not looking at her. She would come behind me then and I wouldnt pet her unless she was calm. Most times she licked as soon as I touched, so I would stop and wait. I also would not allow her to hide. Our lab was abused as well, and she would hide if you sneezed, yelled, coughed etc. I eventually closed the door to her kennel and would redirect her to sit beside me when she paniced and tried to hide. Id give her a job to do whenever possible, or ask her to stay in the room even though she was afraid..then ignore her, here and there Id remind her she was to think about working, (sit, down, come) and not to be obsessing about the sneeze I just had. Making sure I wasnt emotionally affected by her feeling traumatized. I think if she can see that I believe there is nothing to be afraid of, she will believe/feel it and calm down. The lab is a completely different dog now.
Clara (the boston) took about 3 months of consistent calming sygnals, lots of yawning, looking away and just letting her lay beside me with out me touching her. She is still a bit nervous in some situations, but is easy to settle down.
It also helped to teach her a few tricks. Its hard when they are so afraid...we used sit, and high five. We used a treat some of the time but usually just a tiny bit of attention. Remember not to get very excited. She was distracted by having something to do, and the high five required her to open up her poture instead of being hunched over afraid all the time. It also helped to keep her moving on walks, ignoring the scarey garbage bags and other things she would try to dart away from. You can try teaching him to jump onto something, an ottoman, park bench, whatever, then jump off. Not sure why but it also helped both our dogs to become more confidant in themselves. If the dog gets on you and immediatly licks and gets neurotic, put him on the floor, or at least on the couch beside you. Let him know you dont want any part of the neurotic energy on your lap. He can sit with you when he is calm. Be sure to catch him being calm and reward him with lovies.
She was also afraid of being leashed on her collar, so we got her a harness with a t-shirt underneith. Having the t-shirt made her feel more secure. We have used a shirt on our boxer as well to calm anxiety.

Good luck!

MIA
June 10th, 2008, 09:35 PM
I currently have a foster that would lick you till the cows come home!!! I simply say in a calm voice, thank you and gently move her away and ignore her, she's totally caught on and will now give a few kisses then lie next to me, only took a couple weeks!!! NOW if I giggle or kiss back, it's GAME ON!!!! LOL but once I calm down and say thank you she's done.

14+kitties
June 10th, 2008, 09:50 PM
Bruiser is a year and 5 months. He was already 4 months when we got him. The vet said he had alot of anxiety. He suggests getting him fixed or giving him some kind of anxiety pills until he learns to calm down. I don't know if I feel comfortable with the pills. I think there must be another way of dealing with the problem.


Why, at 1 year, 5 months, is Bruiser not fixed? I am not saying it will help because I think it has now become behavioural but he may calm down a little.

dotrocka1
July 6th, 2008, 10:40 AM
I have the same problem with my 7 yr old Agatha (half Lahsa, half ?) She has always done this, and it's incessant. My theory was that it had something to do with leaving her mother too early. Her mother was hit by a car and killed when she was 5 1/2 weeks old, and had just started eating solid food. She will pick a spot on my body and lick til I can't stand it anymore, and tell her, "That's enough." Sometimes she'll pick a sore, and lick it till it hurts. Doesn't sound like your dog left mom too early, though. Feedback from others who know?