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Why do people bring rescue dogs to the park that are vicious?

prelag
May 9th, 2008, 07:59 PM
First, I am all for rescue animals. My girlfriend just rescued an 8 month old Airedale. My problem is that some rescue animals have been abused so badly that they need special treatment. As an owner, YOU should know whether or not your dog is vicious. For example, my parents have a three year old Boston who just doesn't like other dogs. I don't take him to the dog park, period. Back to my rant.

I have been taking my English Bulldog Pup to the dog park for about a month now. He is five months old and the most loving little guy I've ever been around.

Over the past two nights I have been taking him to the dog park with my girlfriends Airedale at sunset because of the wicked heat here in Vegas. Well, it seems that there is a little "clan" of people who meet up here with there dogs at this same exact hour. One of these people warned me of the "Brits" who had dogs with shock collars. One of them a rescue animal who had been severely abused.

The other night I walked into the dog park a medium sized dog began to growl at me. Then, it began to growl at my pup. I decided to keep my pup on the leash the entire time we were there and just watched my gf's Airedale run about because I noticed that the growling dog had a, you guessed it, shock collar. His owner was off chatting up a storm with 4 or 5 other people.

Last night my gf and I arrived and we were the only ones there. We let the dogs loose and a few people came and went. About 30 mins in, the same couple show up with their dogs. Both are exactly the same type and both have shock collars. (I honestly don't know what breed they are)

My English Bulldog was super tired at this point and just laying down in the middle of the dog park. When, low and behold, the other dog ran over to him, grabbed him by the back, clamped down, and started to shake his head back and forth viciously. My GF was standing right there and picked my Bulldog pup up with one hand and nudged the other dog away. This was followed by her saying "ITS TIME TO GO!" I could tell she was very pissed off.

Anyhow, the lady did come over about two min later as we were exiting the gate to see if my dog was "alright." She laughed and said, "for some reason, my dogs just don't like ones with smashed in faces!"

At this point I just said, "Well, you are responsible for your dogs, if they show aggression, then maybe you should have them on a leash in the park until they learn to play nice."

So, has anyone had a problem like this? I would simply go to another park but this one if about 5 min from home. The other is a 30 min drive.

I am a pretty nice guy, but, if it happens again, I can't say I won't totally lose my cool. Give me some advice! :shrug:

happycats
May 9th, 2008, 08:18 PM
Why do you think only abused rescue dogs are vicious?
I have a rescue dog, and I am a little miffed at the title of your post, why couldn't you just say "why do people bring dogs to the park that are vicious" ? does it really matter if it's a rescue, or a bought dog that's vicious?
Pure bred dogs, expensive dogs, shelter dog, well loved dogs, all have the capability of being vicious. It's not just abused rescue dogs that can be vicious.

aslan
May 9th, 2008, 08:23 PM
i agree with happycats, my golden retriever was just attacked this evening by a purebred husky, the woman has raised him since a pup. I understand your upset about these agressive dogs going after your little guy, but it's not just rescues who do it.

prelag
May 9th, 2008, 08:25 PM
Why do you think only abused rescue dogs are vicious?
I have a rescue dog, and I am a little miffed at the title of your post, why couldn't you just say "why do people bring dogs to the park that are vicious" ? does it really matter if it's a rescue, or a bought dog that's vicious?
Pure bred dogs, expensive dogs, shelter dog, well loved dogs, all have the capability of being vicious. It's not just abused rescue dogs that can be vicious.

I am sorry you took offense to the title of my post. The dog in question was a rescue dog, he was vicious, and I am pretty sure I prefaced my rant saying that I was not including all "rescue" animals.

I in no way, shape, or form, indicated that only rescue animals can be vicious. If it came off that way it wasn't my intention.

LavenderRott
May 9th, 2008, 08:29 PM
I guess my question would be - why take your dog to an offleash park?

prelag
May 9th, 2008, 08:31 PM
i agree with happycats, my golden retriever was just attacked this evening by a purebred husky, the woman has raised him since a pup. I understand your upset about these agressive dogs going after your little guy, but it's not just rescues who do it.

I understand where you are coming from. What I was trying to get across in my original post was that some "rescue" dogs have behavioral issues due to being beat, maltreated, etc...

Like I said in my post, animals like this should be kept on a leash until they have learned how to behave by overcoming their problems. My Boston is a purebred, and he does not go to dog parks because he shows aggression toward other animals.

What it all comes down to is people being responsible for their dogs. I come here for advice and I get beat up about trying to say "all rescue dogs are vicious."

Jump to conclusions much? :shrug:

prelag
May 9th, 2008, 08:34 PM
I guess my question would be - why take your dog to an offleash park?

My question would be - why not? Because I have come across one bad dog owner? If so, maybe I should stop! :laughing:

BMDLuver
May 9th, 2008, 08:39 PM
I'm trying to figure out what idiot gave these people dogs and then what rocket scientist suggested they have shock collars on. Personally, the best way to handle this situation is approach whomever is responsible for this particuliar dog park and ask if there are guidelines or restrictions in place for dogs who are not well socialised and exhibit inappropriate behaviour with other dogs. They did that in Lasalle and the park became a locked park with you having a key to use it once your dog was established to be well socialised. Just some thoughts.

BMDLuver
May 9th, 2008, 08:43 PM
My question would be - why not? Because I have come across one bad dog owner? If so, maybe I should stop! :laughing:

I think LR was more getting at that your dog is young and it's a critical point in it's development right now so negative encounters can have an effect on your dog for life. Dog parks in general are not a very controlled environment as people don't pay a lot of attention to their dogs etc.. not all people but in every dog park there seems to be a few who ruin it for others...

prelag
May 9th, 2008, 08:43 PM
I'm trying to figure out what idiot gave these people dogs and then what rocket scientist suggested they have shock collars on. Personally, the best way to handle this situation is approach whomever is responsible for this particuliar dog park and ask if there are guidelines or restrictions in place for dogs who are not well socialised and exhibit inappropriate behaviour with other dogs. They did that in Lasalle and the park became a locked park with you having a key to use it once your dog was established to be well socialised. Just some thoughts.

Finally, someone with some advice. Thank you for not railing me about what I should or shouldn't have said in my rant!

You know, we are living a time now where people are too lazy to "train" their dogs. Instead of dealing with their behavioral issues, they just slap on a shock collar and call it a day.

:2cents:

prelag
May 9th, 2008, 08:47 PM
I think LR was more getting at that your dog is young and it's a critical point in it's development right now so negative encounters can have an effect on your dog for life. Dog parks in general are not a very controlled environment as people don't pay a lot of attention to their dogs etc.. not all people but in every dog park there seems to be a few who ruin it for others...

This is understandable. But, using that same theory, dog attacks happen on a daily basis when you are just walking the block. Albiet, a lot less frequently.

In all honesty, I keep a really close eye on my dog the entire time I am there. This is the only problem I have had in the month I have been taking him there. If it happens again with a different animal, I will definitely rethink the whole "dog park" ideal.

As it stands now though, I have had nothing but good experiences barring the aforementioned one in said rant.

LavenderRott
May 9th, 2008, 08:51 PM
Finally, someone with some advice. Thank you for not railing me about what I should or shouldn't have said in my rant!

You know, we are living a time now where people are too lazy to "train" their dogs. Instead of dealing with their behavioral issues, they just slap on a shock collar and call it a day.

:2cents:

Exactly why my dogs have never, and will never, go to a dog park.

It has less to do with your puppy and much more to do with the people who who take their unsocialized, untrained dogs there, turn them loose and then spend their time talking to other people and ignoring their dogs.

prelag
May 9th, 2008, 09:07 PM
Exactly why my dogs have never, and will never, go to a dog park.

It has less to do with your puppy and much more to do with the people who who take their unsocialized, untrained dogs there, turn them loose and then spend their time talking to other people and ignoring their dogs.

Very well put. Perhaps I will start to socialize my pup in a more controlled environment where he can play with other dogs on my terms.

:thumbs up

LavenderRott
May 9th, 2008, 09:11 PM
Enrolling in a puppy class is an excellent way to meet responsible dog owners who would love to make friends with people who have puppies for some playtime. ;)

BeagleMum
May 9th, 2008, 09:31 PM
I just started to take my two to the off leash park because I finally found one that is fenced in. Spencer has issues meeting a dog when he is on leash so it is hard to socialize him that way, the park is awesome for that and he has a great time. I agree though, every park has a bunch of idiots who stand there and chat and drink their latte rather than paying any attention to their dogs. I am always watching every move that my two make and if it looks like anything is getting out of hand, we are out of there. So far, we have not had any issues although I have had some at other parks.

badger
May 9th, 2008, 10:21 PM
I would have been seriously pissed at the woman whose dog didn't like 'the ones with smashed-in faces', not for what she said but her total lack of responsibility. People use the park behind my house as a dog park, even though it definitely isn't and there are lots of confrontations. The worst, I am sad to say, are the pit-bull owners, who laugh, they get a kick out of it. There seem to be dozens of pitty pups around these days, not to mention the young post-litter females with saggy teats :sad:. I digress.

MissDorsie
May 10th, 2008, 01:22 PM
Personally, I like to find nearby schoolyards that are fenced in, and take my pup there to romp when there isn't any school in session. I leave her leash on just in case I need to catch her in a hurry. She just adores it and I have a little peace of mind, as long as there aren't any kids around playing.

Chaser
May 10th, 2008, 02:03 PM
I'm kind of lucky in my city - there are primarily two parks available: one that is large and fenced in, and one that is a large section of hiking trail where off-leash is allowed. I have found that the fenced in one (though it does have some great people and dogs at times) often attracts the owners who have not trained their dogs well and just come to chat with other people and ignore their dogs. These are the ones who use the park for their dogs to "release their energy"...BAD idea, that's what walks are for! The last place a dog with pent-up energy should be is at the dog park! I have had some bad experiences there and now only go at certain times when I notice the most responsible owners tend to congregate.

The second park, the hiking trail, tends to attract more people who are serious about providing their dogs with training, good exercise, and some socialization. If you can find an area such as this, where the owners are forced to do more than stand around, chat, and drink their coffee, I think you'll naturally find more responsible owners than the ones in question!

btw, what kind of :censored: put a shock collar on a dog, especially a rescue???? That isn't training! It's horrible to hear that...Anyone who tries to put one of those on their dog deserves to wear one themselves. :2cents:

kiara
May 10th, 2008, 03:19 PM
I think that if someone has a dog that bites, it needs a muzzle. It is a danger to other animals and people. My mother's little dog was bitten by a big dog in her own building. The owners of the big dog were irresponsible dog owners!!! My mother's dog needed to go to a vet. (Unnecessary pain and suffering and vet expenses for a pensioner!!!) So, whenever she took her dog out for a walk and she would see a big dog approaching, she would pick hers up. I am an animal rescuer and there are a few different points here to discuss. First of all any dog can be vicious or aggressive. The problem with "rescue" dogs that are vicious is this, that many rescuers are (unfortunately) bleeding hearts and don't believe that these poor abused dogs sometimes cannot be rehabilitated. These rescuers are the other extreme of the people who are animal abusers. And of course the public wants to hear the words "NO KILL", which in some cases is totally unrealistic. I was a witness to such a situation where a very large dog was an abused dog, yet it got adopted out to the public and of course the new owner got bit. I nearly called the police on this rescue group, but I'm not one to cause trouble. The guts this rescue group had to do this!!! I was totally appalled by their actions!!!

MyBirdIsEvil
May 16th, 2008, 09:57 AM
The problem with "rescue" dogs that are vicious is this, that many rescuers are (unfortunately) bleeding hearts and don't believe that these poor abused dogs sometimes cannot be rehabilitated.

You say many rescuers, well I dunno about there but here that definately doesn't apply. I'd say a very small number of rescuers are like that. If anything most rescue organizations are the opposite, if the dog shows a bit of aggression at all they will not adopt it out.
Now keep in mind I'm talking rescues and shelters, not places like city pounds (specifically just for animal control) which may not even evaluate animals, as the case with the one in my town. But in that case they have a disclaimer saying you adopt the dog at your own risk, it hasn't been evaluated, etc..

There are a select number of people though that think all dogs can be rehabilitated to interact with other dogs in a normal manner and that's definately not true. On the other hand there are some dogs with dog aggression issues that should have the same chance of finding home as other dogs, but the owners should be screened and take precautions so their dogs don't come into contact with other dogs in an uncontrolled situation (like a dog park). Don't necessarily blame the rescue though, some people seem perfect to adopt out to and then completely ignore the rescues suggestions.

Frenchy
May 16th, 2008, 12:57 PM
You say many rescuers, well I dunno about there but here that definately doesn't apply. I'd say a very small number of rescuers are like that. If anything most rescue organizations are the

I really don't know which rescues kiara is talking about because I know pretty much all the ones in the Montreal area and they will never adopted out aggressive dogs !!

mastifflover
May 16th, 2008, 01:19 PM
Unbelievable a shock collar on a dog that is aggressive how stupid. But then again the owner sounds like a moron too. I do go to off leash parks well mainly High Park but honestly I prefer to walk the trails and dog hill when I survey the dogs that are there. But I also watch my dog but so many others do not so you must be vigilant. I do not go often and would rather find a spot Clark can play with his pals that I know are not aggressive and owners that are responsible. Most off leash areas are not great but it really depends on the owners

Sylvie
May 16th, 2008, 02:04 PM
:sorry:I am sorry that you got such a negative feeling from your rant.

I am a rescuer and do not take my rescue or my own dogs to off leash parks. I am in agreement with LavenderRott.

Too many people do not pay attention to their dogs at these parks.

I also live near Hamilton and will never take my dog to the leash free park as I have had 2 friends dogs attacked there. One did not make it. The sad thing is it did not have to happen. The underlying problem is the people not the dogs.

I have taken my dogs to another area where people let their dogs off leash and walk through the trails and there has never been a problem. It is really a hard call to make, because it only takes a second for something to get out of control.

I hope you can find an area where you can go to let your dog enjoy himself without worrying about him being attacked. :2cents:

Dingo
May 23rd, 2008, 02:09 AM
I take my dog to a local off-leash fenced park. It's great because it's the only place I can trust him off his leash, and no amount of walking with me can equal rushing around with a bunch of other dogs. I've had a few bad experiences in dog parks, however, including that one, with dogs that have been very aggressive and owners that have done nothing about it.

In one case I had to actually hit another dog to get it to release my poor friendly puppy's face from it's teeth, while it's owners did absolutely nothing. In another case, at a different park, I actually had to pick my puppy up to prevent an older, much larger dog from biting him. Again, the owners did nothing. And in both cases I was the one who had to leave the park rather than the *******s whose dogs were attacking mine!

I just don't understand it. On the one occasion that my dog became aggressive with another dog (which was my fault, incidentally. Long story short, it involved posession of a stick) he was on his leash and in a down position before he knew what had hit him, and once he had calmed down everybody went back to playing peacefully. Come on. How hard is it?!

Longblades
May 23rd, 2008, 04:08 PM
Prelag, I can't tell from your post but were you and the GF just standing around? Or walking with your dogs? Movement helps keeps the interaction dynamics from stalling into something you might not want, like aggression. Even if the other owner does not move.

And, the GF picked your pup up with one hand and "nudged" the other dog away? I don't mean to underestimate the potential for a serious encounter but is it possible you over reacted a bit? If that's all it took to end a vicious attack you were incredibly lucky.

For your own safety you should not be putting your hand or arm or face down between two dogs when there are serious teeth involved. OK, I know you shouldn't, but I would probably dive in to save my baby too. Next time I think I might wear my steel toed work boots.

One more thing, it's so hard to do but your pup is probably better OFF the leash. Off leash he can display proper body language and the other dog can read it. Leashes confuse things not to mention get tangled up and might prevent your pup escaping the other dog if he needs to. And if he needs to run away you might get wrapped up in the leash and injured yourself. If you google for some of these topics, off leash, dog park, body language you will get lots of hits that will help you to evaluate the situation and give you suggestions about preventing, or intervening if necessary, another encounter. It is not many adult dogs that will attack a puppy but I do recognize that, in your case here, there may be reason to worry about one.

Went back and reread and it sounds like he was off leash, so sorry about that. But I am leaving the comment because it is an important point.