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fatty lump on my old dog

Hogansma
March 8th, 2008, 12:09 AM
My 12 year old, Bailey, has a fatty lump at the top, inner part of her front leg. It's the size of an egg. She had a needle aspiration done and it is just fat. The vet said he could remove it or just leave it. I'm trying to decide what to do. He said it may grow fast or not at all. Here is my thinking:

1. Leave it. She is 12 and may live very well just leaving it alone. She's no spring chicken to have the surgery done on her. It's not cancerous. She's a besenji cross but looks like she has a bit of husky in her. I looked up the breeds online and their life expectancy is about 12.

2. Have it removed. She's 12 now and if it grows much bigger, it may interfere with her walking. She already has arthritis in her back and hind legs so is not very steady on her feet anyway. If I wait until she's 13 or more, if she makes it, she's that much older for going through the surgery.

Any suggestions? Has anyone had a similar experience? I just want the best for her but don't want to put her through any unnecessary pain.

luckypenny
March 8th, 2008, 12:14 AM
Ok, weird question coming :o. Can it just all be aspirated? Kinda like a minor liposuction without having to put her under? Sorry, I have yet to experience such a condition with my dogs so I don't have any useful advice to offer :o.

:goodvibes: that you find the most appropriate and comfortable solution soon.

hazelrunpack
March 8th, 2008, 12:21 AM
I guess I'd ask myself a few key questions:

How fast has the lump grown to date? Did it just appear or has it been there a long time and just gotten slowly bigger?

Does the lump seem to bother her now? Is she in good health now? Is the lump in a spot where it will appreciably interfere with her mobility if it gets larger? How much larger would it have to get before it does interfere?

We've seen lots of large fatty lumps over the years, but thankfully none of them were in a place that was problematic.

Good luck with your decision. I know how hard this sort of thing can be to decide.

hazelrunpack
March 8th, 2008, 12:26 AM
Ok, weird question coming :o. Can it just all be aspirated? Kinda like a minor liposuction without having to put her under? Sorry, I have yet to experience such a condition with my dogs so I don't have any useful advice to offer :o.

:goodvibes: that you find the most appropriate and comfortable solution soon.

Oooooo...interesting! I wonder if they could do something like that. Seems almost too obvious, doesn't it?

But they'd have to be able to do it with light sedation and a local or it would be just as hard on the dog as the regular surgery. :shrug:

growler~GateKeeper
March 8th, 2008, 03:41 AM
Ok, weird question coming :o. Can it just all be aspirated? Kinda like a minor liposuction without having to put her under?

I have wondered about that but never asked the vet when I had a fast growing one removed from Cally :rolleyes:, and yeah it does seem like a logical thing to do since lipomas are very common in both cats & dogs. I suspect the reason they don't has to do with the possibility of the tumor spreading & infecting other areas like nearby bone & muscles, even if it's just fatty tissue. They would have no way of telling if they got all the cells of the tumor out if they just "sucked" it out. When they go in for surgery they cut a wider area around the tumor (cutting more than just the tumor) to hopefully ensure they got all the tissues connecting the tumor to the skin etc.

The vets will most likely tell you not to handle the tumor very much to reduce the chances of it becoming irritated & spreading.

It the tumor inside the armpit area & being rubbed everytime she moves or is it more in front of the leg?

Some info on Lipomas: http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&S=0&C=0&A=2551

:goodvibes: for Bailey

Hogansma
March 8th, 2008, 01:58 PM
The liposuction sounds good but the vet never mentioned it. My old girl would probably have to be put right out for it cause she doesn't like to be messed with. I rescued her last June and she didn't even like a bath. She was very independant and had to be because her previous master was ill (and died).

I'm not sure how long she has had the lump. She was grossly overweight when i got her so general fat may have hidden it. She has lost 15 pounds with diet and exercise, from 64 to 49 pounds now.

I keep flip-flopping on what to do.

Mud's Mom
March 10th, 2008, 07:58 PM
Bless you for adopting an older dog - they so often get left behind.

We had a german shorthair pointer that was 4 when we rescued him. He had many of these lumps from the age of about 9 to 13 when he died from torsion. We handled each situation seperately. If they didn't bother him and were not fast growing we left them alone. One on his chest got irritated, it got big enough to bother him when he laid down so we had it removed and since he was going to be under we had a few others taken off and had his teeth done at the same time. Another time he needed to be put under for an injury to his foot so we took a couple off then that looked like they were growing faster than others. He was a very sweet but lumpy dog.

I know of a lab that had lumps all over his torso from egg to baseball size and unless they ulcerated the owner left them all alone. Poor thing looked like the elephant dog but he lived just fine till he was almost 16.

Did your vet tell you how to measure and monitor it. You can drive yourself crazy looking at it everyuday. Mine had me on a schedualed plan so my update to her would be acurrate and help to determin best course of action.

Good luck - let us know how it goes.

Hogansma
March 10th, 2008, 09:22 PM
Thank-you for your kind replies. I think I will monitor it for now. I go on holdays in May for almost 3 weeks so am hoping it will be okay until after that. Don't want to worry about her though while away. She will need her teeth cleaned after that so hopefully the vet can do it all at once. The lump is not right in the actual arm pit but slightly lower on the leg and a bit to the front. However, she is short from the shoulder to the elbow, so it actually goes past the elbow. If it grows, it will definitely affect her walking.

She is such a delightful dog! She's independant but sweet natured. My son and I just love her to bits. She has followed me around since the first day I brought her home, 8 months ago. She is 12 sometime this year but hope she will be around for a few more years to come. If anyone gets the chance to adopt an old dog, they are soooo worth it.:)

Frenchy
March 10th, 2008, 09:35 PM
She will need her teeth cleaned after that so hopefully the vet can do it all at once.

That is a good idea. I adopted 3 older goldens , all have or had fatty lumps and many of my older fosters too. If it bothers them , they have surgery. If it doesn't grow and it doesn't bother them , I leave it be. But your dog will have to be put under for the teeth cleaning so the vet should be able to take out the lump at that same time.

Thank you for rescuing an older dog ! :thumbs up

Frenchy
March 10th, 2008, 09:37 PM
Ok, weird question coming :o. Can it just all be aspirated?

I'm pretty sure they can't. I have been so many times to my vet for this ... he never mentioned aspiration for the whole lump. But then again , I never asked. :shrug: