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Dog won't throw up!!??

zztopp
March 6th, 2008, 05:22 AM
My 5-year-old rescue Golden Retriever Kassie, has a horible habit of eating horse manure (we live on a farm). We try to keep her out of it, but there is only so much we can do! I've tried tieing her outside, instead of letting her run loose while I do barn chores, but then she won't move. She'll sit planted and be a nervous-nelly.

Lately she will start "gagging," as if she's going to throw up. She'll race around looking for something to eat, as if to force herself to throw up. She'll resort to snow, dead plants, horse manure, other dog poo and even the wooden stairs in the house :eek: She did that a handful of times in the summer, but I contributed that to her eating grass and it being hard on her stomach -- she would eventually eat enough grass and throw up. But in the winter now, she can't find anything that will do that! And lets face it, I don't really like the way she's trying to solve this problem ...

It's as if there is something stuck in her throat. Something that is irritating her on and off. I tried massaging her throat while she was gagging and it made no difference. Tried to keep her calm and relaxed so as to let whatever go up or down in her throat ... no help!

She threw up in the house a few days ago and it was mostly horse manure -- yuck!

So do I force her to throw up (but how???) or do I try to force whatever it is down??

With horses, we'd shoot mineral oil down their throats (since horses can't throw up ... so it must go down!!) But is that safe to do with a dog? Would plain water be better?

Or is this one of those things that really and truly requires vet attention?? I'm at the end of my leash ... so to speak ;) Not to mention, I'm paying off drivers education AND am going to have a large vet bill for one of my horses next Tuesday -- the last thing I need is a large doggy vet bill too! But if it's necessary then I'll find a way.

Sigh. Silly dog!

Dutchess' Human
March 6th, 2008, 06:13 AM
I don't know if you should force her to throw up.

If you want to do it though, here's a way to turn your dog into a volcano of vomit.

Hold dog's head and pour salt down it's throat. Hold dogs head and pour hydrogen peroxide down it's throat. Instant dog volcano.

Unless it's life threatening, I highly recommend against doing this to your dog. But if you're looking for 100% of the time vomit, you can do this. Hydrogen peroxide on its own will do it but it's not nearly as effective.

BMDLuver
March 6th, 2008, 09:27 AM
I don't know if you should force her to throw up.

If you want to do it though, here's a way to turn your dog into a volcano of vomit.

Hold dog's head and pour salt down it's throat. Hold dogs head and pour hydrogen peroxide down it's throat. Instant dog volcano.

Unless it's life threatening, I highly recommend against doing this to your dog. But if you're looking for 100% of the time vomit, you can do this. Hydrogen peroxide on its own will do it but it's not nearly as effective.

Absolutely do not do this at any time! You can cause the animal to aspirate and have a dead animal on your hands. Do not, I repeat, do not do this!

BMDLuver
March 6th, 2008, 09:29 AM
My 5-year-old rescue Golden Retriever Kassie, has a horible habit of eating horse manure (we live on a farm). We try to keep her out of it, but there is only so much we can do! I've tried tieing her outside, instead of letting her run loose while I do barn chores, but then she won't move. She'll sit planted and be a nervous-nelly.

Lately she will start "gagging," as if she's going to throw up. She'll race around looking for something to eat, as if to force herself to throw up. She'll resort to snow, dead plants, horse manure, other dog poo and even the wooden stairs in the house :eek: She did that a handful of times in the summer, but I contributed that to her eating grass and it being hard on her stomach -- she would eventually eat enough grass and throw up. But in the winter now, she can't find anything that will do that! And lets face it, I don't really like the way she's trying to solve this problem ...

It's as if there is something stuck in her throat. Something that is irritating her on and off. I tried massaging her throat while she was gagging and it made no difference. Tried to keep her calm and relaxed so as to let whatever go up or down in her throat ... no help!

She threw up in the house a few days ago and it was mostly horse manure -- yuck!

So do I force her to throw up (but how???) or do I try to force whatever it is down??

With horses, we'd shoot mineral oil down their throats (since horses can't throw up ... so it must go down!!) But is that safe to do with a dog? Would plain water be better?

Or is this one of those things that really and truly requires vet attention?? I'm at the end of my leash ... so to speak ;) Not to mention, I'm paying off drivers education AND am going to have a large vet bill for one of my horses next Tuesday -- the last thing I need is a large doggy vet bill too! But if it's necessary then I'll find a way.

Sigh. Silly dog!

If you would like her to have available grass, why not consider a big planter and plant some grass seed. That way it's a natural alternative for her and if she does indeed need it to help her digestion it's there for her. I would however consider seeing the vet about this... as she eats manure a lot, perhaps she needs monthly worming instead of seasonal? Just a thought.

Kashi
March 6th, 2008, 09:43 AM
I don't know if you should force her to throw up.

If you want to do it though, here's a way to turn your dog into a volcano of vomit.

Hold dog's head and pour salt down it's throat. Hold dogs head and pour hydrogen peroxide down it's throat. Instant dog volcano.

Unless it's life threatening, I highly recommend against doing this to your dog. But if you're looking for 100% of the time vomit, you can do this. Hydrogen peroxide on its own will do it but it's not nearly as effective.

:eek: Are you serious ???

badger
March 6th, 2008, 09:47 AM
Honestly, I think keeping her tied in a safe place where she can see you or in a spare stall is the lesser of two evils here. I don't know how you could break her of this habit, perhaps there is a way, but sooner or later you might have a huge vet bill on your hands :frustrated:

jessi76
March 6th, 2008, 09:59 AM
Hold dog's head and pour salt down it's throat. Hold dogs head and pour hydrogen peroxide down it's throat. Instant dog volcano.

ETA: salt should never be used. in fact, don't pour ANYTHING down a dog or any other animal's throat. EVER.

oy... don't do this. there is a specific RATIO based on the weight of the dog and the type of peroxide to be used. NEVER EVER DO THIS UNLESS SPECIFICALLY INSTRUCTED AND SHOWN HOW BY A VET. Also, this method (although I'd NEVER recommend it) is really only useful if your dog has just ingested something poisonous that needs to be ejected immediately (i.e. an entire bar of baking cocoa).

that said, if you suspect the dog has something lodged in it's throat, please go to the vet. Obviously your dog can't get it up and needs assistance. it's always better to be safe than sorry, and seeing a vet is definitely preferable than trying to get your dog to vomit.

luckypenny
March 6th, 2008, 10:08 AM
Can you keep Kassie tied to you as you do some of your chores? Tie a 10 foot lead around your waist or through a belt hoop? If she she attempts to eat horse manure, you can correct her immediately :shrug:? If not, how about giving her a really good run for 30-60 minutes (in an area the horses don't have access to) before you do your chores and then tie her? She'll most likely be more relaxed.

Dutchess' Human
March 6th, 2008, 10:41 AM
I guess I'm not popular for posting what a co-worker did to save his dog's life when he was a few hours away from a vet. The dog had got into some rat poison, he called his vet and was told this would work. It did, and the dog is still alive today.

Did I tell anyone to do it? Nope. In fact, I recommended against it unless it was life threatening.

rainbow
March 6th, 2008, 12:42 PM
Can you keep Kassie tied to you as you do some of your chores? Tie a 10 foot lead around your waist or through a belt hoop? If she she attempts to eat horse manure, you can correct her immediately :shrug:? If not, how about giving her a really good run for 30-60 minutes (in an area the horses don't have access to) before you do your chores and then tie her? She'll most likely be more relaxed.

I like luckypenny's idea. :thumbs up

Also, if she has been chewing on the wooden steps it is possible that she has splinters stuck in her throat which would require veterinary attention. If she continues the gagging I would take her in to be checked. Good luck and keep us posted. :fingerscr :goodvibes:

pitgrrl
March 6th, 2008, 02:11 PM
I'm a bit confused, are you saying she eats poop and that causes the gagging thing or is she eating poop/grass/wood/etc. to help the gagging problem?

One of my dogs has stomach problems, one of which is basically very bad heartburn where the bile from his stomach comes up and causes pretty substantial discomfort. The most minor version of this is much like you're describing, a sort of couch/gag action, the most extreme is a sort of repeated and rather violent gulping action and eventually vomiting of bile.

He also used to try and eat anything he could find (though we managed to teach him not to) in an effort to help himself feel better.

Anyways, I mention this in case it seems like the same thing to you, in which case I might be able to suggest a few things to try.

There is not, for the record, any manure anywhere near us, so maybe it's an entirely different type of problem :shrug:

zztopp
March 6th, 2008, 03:02 PM
You guys are so darn helpful :)

She eats the horse manure pretty much every time she is out. When/if she starts gagging, she will race around to eat SOMETHING to help her throw up. She's also taken to eating her and her buddies doggy poo, if I won't let her near the manure pile -- arg! We feed them both garlic to make the poo unappetizing, but she seems to not mind the taste now :(

The horse manure is in one place (the manure pile of course!) and she always makes a beeline for it while we have our backs turned, whether she's out for a quick pee or out "helping" around the farm.

When I tie her, she just plants her butt and won't move. The idea of the rope "following" her as she moves terrifies her. (She was a kennel raised breeding dog before I got her, so she was never taught to be tied).

pitgrrl, it sounds similar to your dogs case. How do you treat it?

I guess its back to supervised outings with the dogs! Normally I take them out with me; they do their business and play while I feed horses. She's not an overly energetic dog, so it doesn't take her long to expel the energy :thumbs up

Thanks!

pitgrrl
March 6th, 2008, 03:49 PM
pitgrrl, it sounds similar to your dogs case. How do you treat it?


Well, to be honest, that's the million dollar question.

Some things that have worked, work sometimes, work for other people, etc. are pepcid (you'd have to talk to your vet about dosage), a spoonful of raw honey, eating multiple small meals a day, not exercising after eating, low fat diet (this has no effect in my case, but I've heard it does for some), there are a couple of homeopathic things to try if you're so inclined, Acidity Support by Traditional Tibetian Healing and finally, a digestive enzyme added to food.

All that said, I have yet to find "the cure" after much consultation with vets, homeopaths, nutritionists, etc. so I think the idea is management more than cure if it is indeed the same thing.

Purpledomino
March 7th, 2008, 08:20 AM
I feel your pain about the horse manure thing. My dogs...and most dogs probably, absolutely love eating the stuff. I remember asking my vet about it once, and she pretty much said that it's good fibre :yuck:, I imagine she goes through the same thing since she has horses too, and she wasn't concerned. By the sounds of it, your dog probably has more of a problem with it if she is vomiting or trying to..... anything in moderation, right?

I'd definately ask your vet about the ramifications, and probably be very vigilant about deworming her. If you cannot keep her contained and away from the poops when outside, why don't you put a muzzle on her when she is allowed freedom...that way she can't scarf some down. :D

jessi76
March 7th, 2008, 08:37 AM
on the poo-eating tangent... Solid Gold makes a good product called S.E.P (stop eating poop)

it's a small jar of powder (lasts a while) and you add a tsp or so (directions on jar) to the dog's food. this product does work. my mom uses it for her poo-eating dog. it's not cheap, but not outrageously expensive either.

just a suggestion for the dog poo if the garlic isn't working (the garlic probably helps keep fleas and other little mites off the dogs though :thumbs up).