Pets.ca - Pet forum for dogs cats and humans 

-->

guinea pig inbreeding?

tonkamcd
March 5th, 2008, 05:57 PM
Ok, I am by no means a guinea pig expert, nor do I own any, but I was curious about something, is it consider acceptable practice to inbreed ? specifically with the hairless guinea pigs ? Is there a certain amount of inbreeding that is considered acceptable? For example with dogs, on registered dogs, you can see a certain amount of inbreeding (not like sister to brother or anything) but on a pedigree, I've seen the same dog on both sides of the family etc.

hazelrunpack
March 5th, 2008, 06:50 PM
I hope it's not acceptable. In any mammal, inbreeding is going to result in trouble.

Not sure how detailed to get, cuz I'm not sure how much you know about genetics. Each gene has multiple forms, called alleles. Each allele can result in a different trait--such as blue eyes vs. green eyes. But some alleles, when paired with the same variety, are lethal. When an embryo is conceived, it receives one set of alleles from the mother, one from the father.

Simplistically, breeds are created by intentionally contracting the gene pool. Most breeds were begun with an intentional inbreeding to set a 'type'. You breed for a 'type' by breeding two dogs of similar traits to create the breed. But the 'type' is controlled by the different alleles. So to create the breed, you want to pair up certain alleles so that the characteristics you want to see breed "true". If you can "fix" that allele in the genetic makeup, all the progeny will look similar. The easiest way to do that was to breed back to the same dogs. The alleles that would produce another "type" are excluded.

But in the act of fixing those alleles, there are other parts of the genetic code that also are contracted. And the result can be that certain lethal alleles are retained. The closer the parents are related, the better the chance that deleterious alleles are paired up. If the deleterious alleles pair up, anything from death in the womb to genetic disorders as the animal grows can result.

So I hope that close inbreeding of guinea pigs is not the standard. :fingerscr

jiorji
March 5th, 2008, 07:01 PM
i think those bald guinea pigs, skinnypigs, ARE inbred. They ARE genetically altered ...so i'm guessing they got that through inbreeding

jiorji
March 5th, 2008, 07:04 PM
The modern skinny pig breed was the result of a spontaneous genetic mutation in inbred laboratory strains from Hartley stock at the Eastman Kodak Company in 1979, and henceforth was deliberately reproduced by Charles River Laboratories in a strain that had an intact thymus.[1]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skinny_pig

hazelrunpack
March 5th, 2008, 07:16 PM
AARRRRRGGGGHHHHHH! Poor piggies... :eek:

White mice are inbred, too. One white mouse has pretty much the genetic makeup of the next. Then they look for mutations and try to select for it, resulting in inbred mice with a particular lack or defect for medical testing. Their degree of inbreeding is what makes them a prefered lab animal. :sad:

jiorji
March 5th, 2008, 07:24 PM
but that's how it starts no??

I read that the first labrador retriever was yellow and it was one out of a litter of blacks. So then the guy took that one pup and brd it with another and then i think the new offsprings were inbred so that he could keep the color.

I might be a bit off here...i can't remember where i read about this

and i'm not approving of this, but i guess that's how they do it.

hazelrunpack
March 5th, 2008, 07:31 PM
Yep, that's one way to start a breed. However, the first generations are plagued with problems if you're starting a new breed of domestic animal--dog breeds, for instance, already suffer from a contracted gene pool. To make a new breed...let's say a 'red' lab :D...you'd be further contracting the gene pool, making it even more likely that you'd run into the expression of lethal genes.

I suspect that a lot of problems that run in breeds (such as specific cancers or things like wobblers) are due almost entirely to the inbreeding and limiting of the gene pool that occurred when the breed was established. :shrug:

jiorji
March 5th, 2008, 07:33 PM
I suspect that a lot of problems that run in breeds (such as specific cancers or things like wobblers) are due almost entirely to the inbreeding and limiting of the gene pool that occurred when the breed was established. :shrug:

AH HA!! so BYB are doing a GOOD thing by mixing :laughing::laughing: j/k

hazelrunpack
March 5th, 2008, 07:39 PM
AH HA!! so BYB are doing a GOOD thing by mixing :laughing::laughing: j/k

Yeah...now they can breed a dog with two completely different sets of recessive lethals... :rolleyes:

Rainy
March 6th, 2008, 10:58 PM
Well as someone who had 4 skinny pigs that I forever fostered it is NOT ok to breed them and they most certainly do have a weakened immune system.They are sweeter than sweet so snatch a rescue up quickly and make sure no one breeds them.:)